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Full text of "Armstrong Atlantic State University Catalog"

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Francis Thome 
Biology 




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Armstrong Atlantic 
State University 



1999-2000 Catalog 



Academic Calendar 






Fall, 1999 



Spring, 2000 



Summer, 2000 









Session 1 
(10 weeks) 


Session 2 
(5 weeks) 


Session 3 

(5 weeks) 


Session 4 
(4 weeks) 


Session 5 ! 
(4 weeks) 


Admission Applications Due 


July 1 


Dec. 1 




All Summer Sessions: 


May 5 




New Student Documents & Readmission Deadline 


July 15 


Dec. 15 




All Summer Sessions: 


May 19 




Registration 


Aug. 19-20 


Jan. 6-7 


May 26 


May 26 


June 2 


June 2 


June 2 & 30 


First Day of Class 
Session 1 (15 weeks) 
Session 2 (7 weeks) 
Session 3 (7 weeks) 


Aug. 23 
Aug. 23 
Oct. 21 


Jan. 10 
Jan. 10 
Mar. 7 


May 30 


May 30 


July 5 


June 5 


July 10 


Mid-Term 
Session 1 (15 weeks) 
Session 2 (7 weeks) 
Session 3 (7 weeks) 


Oct.18 
Sept. 16 
Nov. 15 


Mar. 2 
Feb. 2 
Apr. 6 


July 3 


June 15 


July 21 


June 16 


July 21 


Last Day to Withdraw without Automatic Penalty 
Session 1 (15 weeks) 
Session 2 (7 weeks) 
Session 3 (7 weeks) 


Oct.18 
Sept. 16 
Nov. 15 


Mar. 2 
Feb. 2 
Apr. 6 


July 3 


June 15 


July 21 


June 16 


July 21 


Advance Advisement 


Apr. 5-28 


Nov. 8-23, 


29,30 


All Summe 


r Sessions: Apr. 3-26 




Advance Registration (Phone, Web, & Reg.) 


Apr. 12-30 


Nov. 15-Dec. 3 


All Summer Sessions: 


Apr. 10-28 




Last Day of Class 
Session 1 (15 weeks) 
Session 2 (7 weeks) 
Session 3 (7 weeks) 


Dec. 13 
Oct. 13 

Dec. 13 


May 1 
Feb. 28 
May1 


Aug. 8 


July 3 


Aug. 8 


June 30 


Aug. 4 


Reading Day 
Session 1 (15 weeks) 
Session 2 (7 weeks) 
Session 3 (7 weeks) 


none 
none 
none 


May 2 
none 
May 2 


none 


none 


none 


none 


none 


Final Examinations Begin 
Session 1 (15 weeks) 
Session 2 (7 weeks) 
Session 3 (7 weeks) 


Dec. 14 
Oct. 14 

Dec. 14 


May 3 
Feb. 29 
May 3 


Aug. 9 


July 5 


Aug. 9 


July 3 


Aug. 7 


Final Examinations End 
Session 1 (15 weeks) 
Session 2 (7 weeks) 
Session 3 (7 weeks) 


Dec. 20 
Oct. 15 
Dec. 20 


May 9 
Mar. 1 
May 9 


Aug. 10 


July 5 


Aug. 10 


July 3 


Aug. 8 


Graduation 


Dec. 16 


May 10 












Holidays 


Sept. 6 
Oct. 11-12 
Nov. 24-26 


Jan. 17 
Mar. 13-19 




Summer Sessions: May 29 and July 


4 



Contact the Counseling Office for applicatior 


deadlines and dates for the following tests: Institutional Scholastic Aptitude Test (ISAT); College 


Level Examination Prog 


ram (CLEP); Regents' Test. Contact the Admissions Office for application deadlines and dates for the College Placement 


Exam (CPE). Contact the Division of Student Affairs for dates of CHAOS Orientation Sessions. 








* All dates subject to change 














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31 




AASU 



Armstrong Atlantic 
State University 



1999-2000 CATALOG 



A Unit of the University System of Georgia 
Savannah, Georgia 



L 



Table of Contents 



President's Message , 5 

Degree Programs 6 

How To Use This Catalog 8 

The University and the Community 9 

Admissions .. 16 

Expenses and Fees 28 

Financial Aid 34 

Student Life 40 

Academic Policies and Programs 45 

School of Graduate Studies .. 66 

College of Arts and Sciences « 67 

General Studies 68 

Art, Music, and Theatre 70 

Biology 76 

Chemistry and Physics 80 

Computer Science 84 

Criminal Justice, Social and Political Science 86 

Economics ...93 

History 95 

Languages, Literature, and Philosophy 98 

Mathematics 105 

Psychology 108 

College of Education Ill 

Early Childhood Education 116 

Health and Physical Education 119 

Middle Grades and Secondary Education 121 

Special Education 125 

College of Health Professions 127 

Dental Hygiene 128 

Health Science 132 

Medical Technology 136 

Nursing 139 

Physical Therapy 143 

Radiologic Sciences 148 

Respiratory Therapy 150 

Course Index and Descriptions 154 

Special Programs 272 

Study Abroad 272 

Learning Support 272 

Basic Law Enforcement Certificate 273 

Military Science (Army ROTC) 274 

Naval Science (Naval ROTC) 277 

Faculty and Administration 279 

Glossary 295 

Index 299 



ARMSTRONG ATLANTIC STATE UNIVERSITY 




President's Message 



With pride and enthusiasm, let me welcome you to Armstrong Atlantic State 
University. Indeed, please think of this catalog as a letter of introduction to the 
challenges and rewards of a higher education at AASU. 

Long ago, Socrates celebrated "the pleasures that accompany the pursuit of 
learning" — not only the learning that prepares us for a fulfilling career but the 
studies that in themselves help to enrich our lives. At Armstrong Atlantic, we take 
pride in the high standards that we have set for you out of deep respect for the high 
expectations you have set for yourself. 

We are here to help you steer your life, to navigate the future. And in our 
classrooms, laboratories, rehearsal rooms, technology centers, and playing 
fields, we share your enthusiasm for the journey. 



Frank A. Butler 
Interim President 



ARMSTRONG ATLANTIC STATE UNIVERSITY 



Degree Programs 



Bachelor's and master's degrees, as well as minors, certificates, and associate degrees 
available at Armstrong Atlantic State University are listed by subject in the chart below. For 
program listings by college and department, see elsewhere in the catalog Academic Policies and 
Programs and sections for each college, department, and the graduate school. 



SUBJECTS 


/J 


/ •£ 

/ £ 

I T 




f/ii/S/4 


J / & 


Anthropology 


X 




r 










Archaeology, Historical 


X 














Art 


X 




X 


X 








Astronomy 














X 


Biology 


X 




X 


X 








Business Education (with Savannah State University) 








X 


X 






Chemistry 


X 




X 


X 








Communications (degree in English) 






X 










Computer Science 


X 




X 










Crime, Transnational 


X 














Criminal Justice 


X 


X 


X 




X 






Criminal Justice - Corrections 




X 












Criminal Justice - Law Enforcement 




X 












Dental Hygiene 




X 












Dental Hygiene Education 






X 










Drama/Speech - see also Theater 


X 




X 










Economics 


X 




X 










Education - Early Childhood 








X 








Education - Elementary 










X 






Education - Exceptional 












X 




Education - Middle Grades 








X 


X 






Education - Secondary - see content areas 
















Engineering 














X 


Engineering Studies 


X 














English 


X 




X 


X 








English - Communications 






X 










English Education 










X 






Film 


X 














French 


X 














General Studies 




X 


X 










Geography 














X 


Geology 














X 


German 


X 














Gerontology 












X 




Health & Physical Education 








X 








Health Science 






X 










Health Services Administration 










X 






History 


X 




X 


X 


X 






International Studies 


X 














Journalism 














X 


Latin 


X 














Law Enforcement - Basic 












X 




Legal Studies 


X 














Liberal Arts - see General Studies 
















Library Media 


X 















ARMSTRONG ATLANTIC STATE UNIVERSITY 



SUBJECTS 




Linguistics 

Mathematical Sciences 

Mathematics Education 

Medical Technology 

Mental Health 

Meteorology 

Military Science 

Music 

Naval Science 

Nursing 

Oceanography 

Organizational Psychology 

Philosophy 

Physical Education - see Health and Physical Education 

Physical Science 

Physical Therapy 

Physics, Applied 

Political Science 

Political Science - Public Administration 

Psychology 

Public Health 

Public History 

Radiation Therapy 

Radiologic Sciences 

Respiratory Therapy 

Russian Studies 

Science Education - Broadfield 

Social Science Education - Broadfield 

Social Science Education - History 

Social Science Education - Political Science 

Sociology 

Spanish 

Special Education - Behavior Disorders 

Special Education - Behavior Disorders 

(degree in Psychology) 
Special Education - Learning Disabilities 
Special Education - Speech-Language Pathology 
Speech-Language Pathology 
Teacher Education 
Theater - see also Drama/Speech 



X* 
X 
X 
X 
X 



^Bachelor's degree awarded at completion of master's. 



ARMSTRONG ATLANTIC STATE UNIVERSITY 



How to Use This Catalog 



A university catalog (sometimes called a record, bulletin or calendar) is an official publication 
providing a comprehensive, detailed listing of programs, services, rules, requirements, courses, 
administrators, and faculty for one academic year. A catalog is an authoritative document, yet may 
not be taken as a contract between the university and a student. As a general rule, the catalog for 
the academic year during which you are first enrolled will determine the requirements for your 
program completion and graduation. 

Students sometimes use the university catalog solely as a reference — a much-needed guide 
to degree requirements, courses, or deadlines for financial aid and scholarship applications. The 
university's other publications will provide even more detailed information on when and where 
to register, and when and where specific courses are being taught. But college catalogs - and the 
Armstrong Atlantic State University Catalog is no exception - may have other uses as well. 

The many hours you spend earning a degree at Armstrong Atlantic make the university your 
academic home town. You will want to use the catalog as a way to get to know your community. 
Browsing through this catalog may yield information as varied as the following: 

Evening and weekend classes offer flexible scheduling. 

Pre-professional programs in business, dentistry, forestry, medicine, pharmacy, and veterinary 

medicine are available. 

Information about the university and its programs - and even class registration - is available 

on line. 

The graduate school offers advanced degrees in many fields, and has its own catalog. 

Off-campus classes are available in Hinesville and Brunswick, and some degrees may be 

earned while attending classes on those campuses. 

Students may study abroad while earning academic credit at Armstrong Atlantic. 

Non-credit, continuing education classes in a host of subjects are offered to the general public 

every term. 

Armstrong Atlantic engineering students can complete degrees from Georgia Tech in civil and 

computer engineering without leaving Savannah. 

Services for students range from academic advisement and placement testing to computing and 

writing assistance. 

Library holdings number over 800,000 items. 

More than thirty student organizations meet professional, academic, social, religious, and 

special interests. 

The catalog is organized into the following sections: an overview of the university and its 
programs; admissions, financial, student services, and academic information; the university's 
colleges and departments; course descriptions; special programs such as learning support, study 
abroad and ROTC; and last, faculty and administration listings. A table of contents and index are 
available to help you locate information quickly, and the glossary provides some useful definitions 
of terms and acronyms. The current academic calendar is located on the inside front cover to help 
you plan your year, and "Where to Write or Call" on the inside back cover may help you find the 
fastest way to get your questions answered accurately. 

The catalog can be an invaluable tool in planning your time at Armstrong Atlantic State 
University. Keep it handy and use it often. 



ARMSTRONG ATLANTIC STATE UNIVERSITY 



The University and the Community 

Mission Statement 

Armstrong Atlantic State University was founded in 1935 as a city college and continues to 
fulfill an urban mission, teaching a diverse population of traditional and non-traditional students. 
Throughout its history, Armstrong Atlantic has shared its creative, scholarly, technical, and 
leadership expertise with individuals and organizations throughout southeast Georgia, and has 
been designated as a regional health professions education center. Offering a broad range of 
programs in arts and sciences, teacher education, health professions, and graduate studies, 
Armstrong Atlantic provides all students with a firm foundation in the liberal arts and anchors its 
academic excellence in its baccalaureate and graduate programs. 

Armstrong Atlantic State University shares with other institutions in the University System of 
Georgia the following common mission: 

The mission of the University System of Georgia is to contribute to the educational, cultural, 
economic, and social advancement of Georgia by providing excellent undergraduate general 
education and first-rate programs leading to associate, baccalaureate, masters, professional, and 
doctoral degrees; by pursuing leading-edge basic and applied research, scholarly inquiry, and 
creative endeavors; and by bringing these resources to bear on the economic development of the 
state and the continuing education of citizens through public service. 

While the core teaching, research and scholarship, and service functions differ by institutional 
type, the campus life of every institution in the University System of Georgia will be characterized 
by: 

• a supportive campus climate, necessary services, and leadership and development opportuni- 
ties, all to educate the whole person and meet the needs of students, faculty, and staff; 

• cultural, ethnic, racial, and gender diversity in the faculty, staff, and student body, supported 
by practices and programs that embody the ideals of an open, democratic, and global society; 

• technology to advance educational purposes, including instructional technology, student 
support services, and distance education; 

• collaborative relationships with other University System of Georgia institutions, state agen- 
cies, local schools and technical institutes, and business and industry, sharing physical, human, 
information, and other resources to expand and enhance programs and services available to the 
citizens of Georgia. 

Armstrong Atlantic State University shares with the other state universities of the University 
System of Georgia the following core characteristics or purposes: 

• a commitment to excellence and responsiveness within a scope of influence defined by the 
needs of an area of the state, and by particularly outstanding programs or distinctive 
characteristics that have a magnet effect throughout the region or state; 

• a commitment to a teaching/learning environment, both inside and outside the classroom, that 
sustains instructional excellence, serves a diverse and university-prepared student body, 
promotes high levels of student achievement, offers academic assistance, and provides 
developmental studies programs for a limited student cohort; 

• a high quality general education program supporting a variety of disciplinary, interdiscipli- 
nary, and professional academic programming at the baccalaureate level, with selected 
master's and educational specialist degrees, and selected associate degree programs based on 
area need and/or inter-institutional collaborations; 

• a commitment to public service, continuing education, technical assistance, and economic 
development activities that address the needs, improve the quality of life, and raise the 
educational level within the university's scope of influence; 

• a commitment to scholarly and creative work to enhance instructional effectiveness and to 
encourage faculty scholarly pursuits, and a commitment to applied research in selected areas 
of institutional strength and area need. 



10 ARMSTRONG ATLANTIC STATE UNIVERSITY 



The primary mission of Armstrong Atlantic State University is to foster in its students abilities 
essential to being knowledgeable, thoughtful, responsible, and creative members of society. For 
its population of traditional and nontraditional students, Armstrong Atlantic strives to promote 
academic excellence and provide appropriate access to its programs, including magnet offerings 
in health professions, teacher education, public history, criminal justice, and transfer programs in 
engineering studies. Moreover, Armstrong Atlantic shall: 

• augment traditional classroom instruction and provide student-centered learning through the 
integration of new technologies and innovative methods of course delivery; 

• improve and expand access through distance learning, flexible course scheduling, and 
development of off-campus sites; 

• respond to student needs through accessible faculty and administrators, an effective student- 
teacher ratio, and appropriate learning support; 

• foster a deepened understanding of diverse world views and experiences through the exami- 
nation of multicultural and international perspectives across the curriculum and activities that 
encourage respect for human worth; 

• offer activities to students that help to prepare them for the work place or for further study 
through a wide array of leadership programs, experiential training, and entrepreneurial 
opportunities; 

• optimize resources and expand educational opportunities for citizens throughout Georgia 
through the interchange of faculty and programs and in partnerships with other educational 
institutions, especially other units of the University System. 

In shaping its vision for the twenty-first century, Armstrong Atlantic has assumed a leadership 
role in the application and integration of new educational technologies. The institution aspires to 
build upon its already excellent curricular and urban oriented research programs and expand its 
magnet offerings, especially in the sciences. A planned student body profile based on admissions, 
progressions, and graduation expectations shall enhance institutional effectiveness. Finally, 
Armstrong Atlantic assumes responsibility for initiating collaborative efforts and for attracting 
and cultivating credit and non-credit programs designed to meet societal needs in such areas as 
economic development, health, cultural life, and technological advancement. 
Approved by the Board of Regents of the University System of Georgia - June, 1996 

Accreditation 

Armstrong Atlantic State University is accredited by the Commission on Colleges of the 
Southern Association of Colleges and Schools (1866 Southern Lane, Decatur, Georgia 30033- 
4097: Telephone number 404-679-4501) to award associate, baccalaureate and master's degrees. 

Armstrong Atlantic State University programs have earned the following special purpose 
accreditations: 

Computer Science - by the Computer Science Accreditation Commission. 
Dental Hygiene - by the Commission on Dental Accreditation of the American Dental Associa- 
tion for the period 1995-2001. 
Medical Technology - by the National Accrediting Agency for Clinical Laboratory Sciences for 

the period 1985-2004. 
Music - by the National Association of Schools of Music for the period 1995-2005. 
Nursing (Baccalaureate Degree) - by the National League for Nursing Accrediting Commission 

for the period 1983-1999. 
Radiologic Sciences - by the Joint Review Committee on Education in Radiologic Technology 

for the period 1984-1999. 
Respiratory Therapy - by the Committee on Accreditation of Allied Health Educational 

Programs for the period 1997-2002. 
Teacher Education Programs - by the National Council for the Accreditation of Teacher 

Education. 



PROGRAMS 11 



Degree Programs 

Degree programs are listed by subject at the front of this catalog; by college and department 
at the end of the section on Academic Policies and Programs; and at the beginning of the section 
for each college and department. Minor concentrations and certificate programs are noted at the 
front, and requirements for all degrees described in detail in the departmental listings. 

Evening Programs and Weekend College 

To accommodate students who are employed during the day, all core curriculum courses and 
many upper-division courses are offered in the late afternoon and evening. At present, the 
following degree programs are available to students who attend classes exclusively in the evening: 
associate of arts; associate of applied science in criminal justice; baccalaureate in English 
(communications), computer science, criminal justice, economics, English, general studies, 
history, mathematics, political science, public administration, and psychology. 

Although evening offerings are expanded annually, students may take longer to complete 
degree requirements by attending evening classes exclusively than by attending day classes or a 
combination of day, evening, and weekend classes. 

Weekend College complements the evening programs of the university. Saturday classes 
include core curriculum courses in art, composition, economics, history, philosophy, physical 
education, physical science, political science, psychology, sociology, and speech communica- 
tions. Weekend College serves the growing number of students who need a non-traditional 
schedule to allow them to make progress toward graduation. The office of weekend and off- 
campus programs oversees the development and promotion of the evening and weekend programs. 

Armstrong Atlantic State-Savannah State Cross Enrollment 
Program 

Students enrolled in at least 6 semester hours at Savannah State University or at Armstrong 
Atlantic State University have the privilege of taking courses at the other university without 
paying an additional fee. However, more than one half of the semester hours must be taken at the 
home university. Students enrolled at Armstrong Atlantic who are majoring in business education 
may take more than half of their courses at Savannah State — see the College of Education section 
of this catalog. 

Pre-Professional Programs 

Armstrong Atlantic State University offers courses appropriate for the first two years of 
baccalaureate programs — such as business, engineering, forestry, industrial management, and 
pharmacy — not offered among its degree programs, and offers the pre-professional study 
appropriate for dentistry, law, medicine, veterinary medicine, and other professional fields. 

Regents Engineering Transfer Program 

The Regents Engineering Transfer Program (RETP) is a cooperative program between 
Armstrong Atlantic and Georgia Institute of Technology, allowing qualified students to attend 
Armstrong Atlantic for the first two years of engineering studies, then transfer to Georgia Tech 
to complete their bachelor of engineering degree. RETP students transferring to Georgia Tech 
compete on a equal basis with Georgia Tech students at the junior academic level. To be admitted 
as RETP students, applicants must meet academic requirements set for the program, and be U.S. 
citizens with Georgia residency. Specific information on requirements for admission is available 
in the admissions section of this catalog or from the engineering studies program coordinator in 
the Department of Chemistry and Physics. 

Georgia Tech Regional Engineering Program 

The Georgia Tech Regional Engineering Program (GTREP) is a new, partially "virtual" 
university that builds on the strengths of the RETP. Through GTREP. students are allowed to 



12 ARMSTRONG ATLANTIC STATE UNIVERSITY 



complete Georgia Tech degrees in civil and computer engineering without leaving the Savannah 
area. Freshman and sophomore classes will be taught by Armstrong Atlantic State University 
faculty with the final two years to be taught by resident Georgia Tech faculty and innovative 
distance learning methods. Academic requirements for admission into GTREP are the same as 
those for RETP. Unlike RETP, GTREP is open to out of state students with U.S. citizenship or 
permanent resident status. 

Dual-Degree Programs 

Armstrong Atlantic has dual-degree programs in engineering with the Georgia Institute of 
Technology, Auburn University, Clemson University, Mississippi State University, and the 
University of Florida. Upon completion of the first three years of academic work at Armstrong 
Atlantic, students may enroll for two subsequent years at one of the participating schools. Upon 
completing the requirements of the two cooperating schools, students receive a baccalaureate 
degree from Armstrong Atlantic and a baccalaureate degree in the chosen field of engineering 
from the second school. Contact the associate dean of the College of Arts and Sciences, who is 
the Armstrong Atlantic coordinator of these dual-degree programs, for additional information. 

A dual-degree program in forestry and environmental management with Duke University is 
available. Students complete three years of academic work at Armstrong Atlantic, then enroll for 
two subsequent years at Duke. Students who successfully complete the program receive a 
bachelor of science degree in biology from Armstrong Atlantic State University and a master of 
science degree in either forestry or environmental management from Duke University. The head 
of the Department of Biology should be contacted for additional information. 

Cooperative Education Program 

In the cooperative education program, students typically alternate semesters between college 
and work. This program offers students valuable practical experience as well as financial 
assistance in the form of compensation from the firms employing them. Cooperative opportunities 
are available to students in computer science, chemistry, and engineering, but are not limited to 
these majors. Cooperative students must register for the cooperative education program for 
semesters in which they work. This course carries no credit and there is no charge for registration. 
Students interested in applying for admission to the cooperative education program should contact 
the head of their major department and the director of volunteer and service learning, who is the 
director of this program. 

Off-Campus and Distance Learning 

The university offers selected courses at various off-campus sites, including Brunswick 
Center, Liberty Center (Ft. Stewart and Hunter Army Air Field), and the Coastal Georgia Center. 
Although most of these courses are taught by university faculty at the off-campus sites, some may 
be delivered by means of interactive teleconferencing originating from the main campus. 

Armstrong Atlantic is an active member of the Georgia Statewide Academic and Medical 
System (GSAMS). The university oversees the operations of seven interactive distance-learning 
classrooms, three of them on campus (Gamble 113, Health Professions 136, and University Hall 
114) and others at the Brunswick Center, White Bluff Elementary School, the Coastal Georgia 
Center, and Savannah State University. In addition, the university is developing internet resources 
to provide a new medium for learning as well as to supplement more traditional forms of research 
and instruction. 

Brunswick Center 

Approved by the Board of Regents in 1986 as a cooperative effort among Armstrong Atlantic 
State University, Coastal Georgia Community College, and Georgia Southern University, the 
Brunswick Center serves as a consortium dedicated to expanded higher education offerings in and 
around the Brunswick, Georgia area. The center is located on the campus of the Coastal Georgia 
Community College. Armstrong Atlantic offers degree programs for a bachelor of general studies, 



PROGRAMS 13 



bachelor of science in education in early childhood education and middle grades education, 
bachelor of science in nursing, and associate of science in dental hygiene through this off-campus 
site. 

All three participating institutions teach courses which apply toward the degrees, and credit 
earned from any of these colleges through the Brunswick Center is accepted as resident credit by 
Armstrong Atlantic State University. 

Liberty Center 

As a result of a cooperative effort by Armstrong Atlantic State University, Savannah State 
University, Georgia Southern University, Coastal Georgia Community College, East Georgia 
College, Fort Stewart, and business, civic, and educational leaders in Hinesville and Liberty 
County, the Liberty Center was established to offer courses to students in the Liberty County area 
who would like to pursue higher education locally. The Liberty Center is located at the Fort 
Stewart Army Education Center. Courses are offered at the center and at other area sites. Core 
curriculum, learning support, and other courses leading to a wide array of associate, bachelor's 
and master's degrees are offered by the consortium. 

Regional Criminal Justice Training Center 

The Armstrong Atlantic State University Regional Criminal Justice Training Center is a 
regional training site for criminal justice employees, especially those in law enforcement. The 
region consists of eighteen counties; however, training is made available to all criminal justice 
employees throughout Georgia. The basic mission of the center is to provide certification classes 
for law enforcement and jail officers. In addition, there are numerous advanced and specialized 
courses for higher certification credits. The training center has seven full-time staff members and 
a large part-time instructor cadre. 

Public Service Center 

The Armstrong Atlantic State University Public Service Center assists public organizations in 
identifying and resolving complex urban and regional issues. The center provides faculty and staff 
training and expertise to help public sector agencies design more effective, efficient means to 
deliver services. City and county governments; nonprofit human service and cultural groups; 
boards of education; colleges and universities; and state, regional, and local agencies all may 
benefit from the center's programs and services. 

Services offered have grown to include the following specialties: 

• applied research and analysis of issues and problems; 

• program evaluation and surveying; 

• analysis and consultation on policy, procedure, and operations; 

• in-service training and personnel assessment; 

• program development and planning to improve delivery of services; 

• information collection and dissemination; 

• grant and proposal writing. 

Continuing Education 

Armstrong Atlantic's Department of Continuing Education provides opportunities for life- 
long learning for Savannah and the coastal region by offering non-credit (non-degree) courses, 
seminars, and activities. A variety of programs has been designed to improve professional skills, 
enhance leisure activities, and foster personal enrichment. The department also coordinates 
conferences, workshops, and customized training (on a contract basis) for business and industry. 
Instructors are university faculty or other qualified experts from our region. 



14 ARMSTRONG ATLANTIC STATE UNIVERSITY 



Participants in designated continuing education courses may earn continuing education units 
(CEUs), which are a nationally recognized measure of participation in professional education, 
training, and development programs. Permanent CEU records are maintained by the registrar's 
office. 

For more information about course offerings and schedules, contact the department. 

Elderhostel 

Elderhostel is an educational adventure for older adults. Participants from all over the world 
travel to college campuses, recreational sites, and conference centers in over 47 countries for 
academic and cultural enrichment. Participants are on site for a week, usually participating in three 
courses set up by the program coordinator. These courses are strictly informational, require no 
testing or grading, and are often supplemented by tours and extracurricular activities. 

Armstrong Atlantic State University has been providing Elderhostel since 1 986 and now offers 
more than 85 weeks of programming per year at four sites: the Armstrong Atlantic campus, west 
Chatham County, historic Savannah, and Tybee Island. Armstrong Atlantic's program is open to 
applicants from the community, nation, and abroad. Individuals 55 years of age and older are 
eligible. The program brings in more than 2600 participants annually, contributing to Georgia's 
status as the second most popular state in the program. 

Location 

Armstrong Atlantic students, faculty, and staff find much to enjoy about living in the 
cosmopolitan city of Savannah, the major urban area in coastal Georgia (population 280,000). The 
university's 250-acre campus is located in a residential area of the city which promotes a feeling 
of freedom and security. Leisure activities such as NCAA intercollegiate athletics, intramurals, 
concerts, plays, and special entertainment provide much to do without leaving campus. But those 
wishing to venture into the community will find many activities awaiting them. 

Savannah, Georgia's founding city, has all the cultural variety of a metropolitan city with the 
added advantage of the ocean at its back door. The historic past lives in harmony with a vibrant 
present in Savannah. As a living laboratory for history, Savannah is unsurpassed, yet the Savannah 
port is one of the busiest on the Atlantic coast. A temperate climate encourages year-round outdoor 
recreation. Beach and river activities include sailing, boating, water skiing, sunning, and 
beachcombing. Golf, tennis, fishing, and hunting are also popular, and world-class aquatic and 
weight-lifting facilities are a short drive from the campus. A resident symphony orchestra, dance 
and theater groups, and popular entertainers regularly perform at the Chatham County Civic 
Center. Special celebrations and festivals are scheduled in and around the city throughout the year. 

Office of University Relations 

The office of university relations promotes Armstrong Atlantic, its students, faculty, and 
activities, through interaction with media representatives. The office is responsible for external 
publications and promotions related to the university, including Armstrong Magazine and the 
alumni newsletter. The office of university relations serves as the liaison between the university 
and media representatives, and reports media activities to University System of Georgia public 
relations representatives. 

Office of University Advancement 

The office of university advancement houses both alumni affairs and development (which 
includes the AASU Foundation, Inc.). The office works with graduates, friends, area businesses, 
corporations, foundations, and other supporters of Armstrong Atlantic by providing a vehicle of 
communication and fundraising support. 



PROGRAMS 15 



Alumni Affairs. The office of alumni affairs serves as a liaison to the alumni association, 
Armstrong Atlantic graduates, former students, and friends. The office maintains current alumni 
records, processes alumni membership dues, and circulates university and alumni information. 
Membership in the association is open to all graduates and former students. 

Organized in 1937, the AASU Alumni Association is comprised of graduates and former 
students of Armstrong Junior College, Armstrong State College, and Armstrong Atlantic State 
University. The association promotes interaction among alumni, students, faculty, staff, and 
friends of the university in order to strengthen the ties between the institution and its supporters. 
Every year the alumni association recognizes individuals who have made outstanding contribu- 
tions to the university and the association by presenting the Distinguished Alumni Award, the 
Outstanding Alumni Service Award, the Distinguished Citizen's Award, and the Outstanding 
Faculty Award. 

Development. In support of Armstrong Atlantic, alumni and friends can make donations of 
cash, securities, or other qualifying assets through the AASU Foundation, Inc. Donations are used 
to respond to challenges and opportunities for growth. The funds provide the university with 
support unavailable through state appropriations. Gifts are also used to assist students through 
scholarships and other financial assistance; support outstanding teachers through faculty devel- 
opment awards and professorships; sponsor symposia and guest lecturers; enhance library 
holdings and facilities; and assist in other special projects and programs. Private support helps 
sustain Armstrong Atlantic's tradition of academic excellence. 

The AASU Foundation, Inc. is a direct support organization and the legal entity for receiving 
gifts to the university. Contributors to the foundation, a 501(c)(3) tax exempt charitable 
organization, are entitled to all tax benefits authorized by law. 



16 ARMSTRONG ATLANTIC STATE UNIVERSITY 



Admissions 

Armstrong Atlantic State University welcomes students who wish to pursue a college-level 
program of study. The office of admissions works hard to make the admissions process an easy 
one. Service to students is our priority, and academic achievement is expected, nurtured, and 
rewarded. If you have any questions about admissions policies, please call us at 927-5277 or 1 - 
800-633-2349. We look forward to hearing from you and wish you well in your university studies. 

Admission Requirements 

All New Applicants. All applicants must submit the following: 

• undergraduate admissions application 

• a $20 nonrefundable application fee 

• certificate of immunization (All applicants must submit a University System of Georgia 
Certificate of Immunization form verifying immunity against measles, mumps, and 
rubella.) 

Freshman Applicants. Applicants applying for freshman admission must submit the follow- 
ing additional documentation: 

• official high school transcript 

• official SAT I or ACT score report 

• official GED score report, if applicable 

The word "official" indicates that documents must be received directly from the forwarding 
institutions. 

Transfer Applicants. Transfer applicants must also submit official transcripts from each 
institution attended. In addition, applicants must meet one of the following requirements to be 
considered for transfer admission: (1) Students who have fewer than 30 transferable semester 
hours must have a transfer grade point average of 1.9 and must also meet freshman admission 
requirements; (2) Students who have 30 or more transferable semester hours must have a transfer 
grade point average of 2.0. See additional information under Transfer Admission. 

Transients. Students enrolled in other colleges or universities may apply to Armstrong 
Atlantic for temporary admission as transient students. Application for transient admission must 
be accompanied by a letter of good standing from the dean or registrar of the home institution. The 
letter of good standing must indicate permission to take specific courses at Armstrong Atlantic 
State University. Transient students are admitted for one semester. If they wish to remain at 
Armstrong Atlantic longer than one semester they must submit a new letter of good standing, or 
must meet all admission requirements for transfer students. Transient students can enroll for no 
more than three consecutive terms. 

Information on delayed (nontraditional), early, international, joint enrollment, outstanding 
student program, and non-degree student admissions, as well as readmission, is listed under 
Special Admission Categories. 

SAT I applications and testing information may be obtained from the College Entrance 
Examination Board (Box 592, Princeton, NJ 08540; 609/771-7975; www.collegeboard.org). 
ACT testing materials may be obtained from the American College Testing Program (3355 Lenox 
Road, NE, Suite 320, Atlanta, GA 33026-1332; 404/231-1952; www.act.org). An institutional 
scholastic aptitude test (ISAT) is offered by the office of counseling services at Armstrong 
Atlantic State University each term. ISAT scores can be used only for admission to Armstrong 
Atlantic State University. AASU uses recentered SAT scores. All original SAT scores will be 
recentered for admission to the university. 

The CEEB code assigned to Armstrong Atlantic State University is 5012. Exceptions to the 
SAT and ACT requirements are discussed in the Special Admission Categories section. 



ADMISSIONS 17 



Regular Admission 

Applicants must meet all of the following minimum admission criteria to be eligible for regular 
admission to the university. 

• SAT verbal score of 460 or ACT English score of 20 

• SAT math score of 430 or ACT math score of 1 8 

• Freshman Index * of 1920 

In addition to meeting the above admissions criteria, applicants graduating, or who would have 
graduated, from high school within the past five years must meet the requirements of the college 
preparatory curriculum (CPC) of the Board of Regents. 

• Freshman Index - Combined SAT I scores + (High School Grade Point Average x 500). The high 
school grade point average is calculated only on CPC course work required for admission. 

College Preparatory Curriculum (CPC) Requirements. CPC requirements are as follows: 
CPC Area (Units) Instructional Emphasis/Courses 

English (4) • grammar and usage 

• literature (American and world) 

• advanced composition skills 
Mathematics (3) • two courses in algebra and one in geometry 
Science (3) • physical science 

• two laboratory courses from biology, chemistry, or physics 
Social Science (3) • acceptable social science courses 

Foreign Language (2) • two courses in one language emphasizing speaking, listening, 
reading, and writing 

Satisfying CPC Deficiencies. Students must satisfy all CPC deficiencies prior to earning 30 
semester hours. In the areas of social science, science, and foreign language, students are required 
to complete the appropriate courses with a C grade or better. Students receive credit for courses 
used to satisfy CPC deficiencies, but such credit may not be used to satisfy core curriculum or 
degree requirements. 

Students who are CPC deficient must satisfy the required course work according to established 
guidelines listed below. 

• English: Students who complete fewer than the four required units of English will be required 
to take the college placement examination (CPE) in English and the CPE in reading. Based on 
a student' s score, the student would either be placed in learning support English and/or reading, 
or be exempted from learning support English and/or reading. 

• Mathematics: Students who complete fewer than the three required units of mathematics will 
be required to take the CPE in mathematics. Based on a student's score, the student would 
either be placed in learning support mathematics, or be exempted from learning support 
mathematics. 

• Science: Students who complete fewer than the three required units of science will be required 
to take an additional three semester hour course in a laboratory science. The course must be 
in the specific content area(s) in which the student is deficient. 

• Social Science: Students who complete fewer than the three acceptable units of social science 
will be required to complete one additional three semester hour course chosen from approved 
social science courses. The course must be in the specific content area(s) in which the student 
is deficient. 

• Foreign Language: Students who complete fewer than two units of the same foreign language 
will be required to complete one additional three semester hour introductory foreign language 
course. 

Applicants who graduate from non-accredited or unapproved high schools, including home 
schooled students and GED recipients, will be required to satisfy CPC requirements by passing 



18 ARMSTRONG ATLANTIC STATE UNIVERSITY 



the SAT II subject tests. For fall semester 1999, applicants who pass the basic group plus two 
additional SAT II subject tests will be eligible for admission to the university if all other freshman 
admission requirements are met. The SAT II subject tests are administered through the College 
Board. 



Basic Group 


Passing Minimum Score 


English Writing 


520 


Math IC 


500 


Math IIC 


570 


American History and Social Studies 


560 


Biology 


520 


Additional SAT II Subject Tests 




Chemistry 


540 


Physics 


590 


English Literature 


530 


World History 


540 



Exceptions to the CPC Requirement. Non-traditional students (see Delayed Admission 
under Special admission Categories) and students pursuing associate of applied science degrees 
or the basic law enforcement certificate are exempt from CPC requirements. 

Limited Admission 

An applicant must meet two of the following minimum admission criteria to be eligible for 
limited admission. Limited admission applicants who are eligible will be placed in an applicant 
pool and considered for admission to the university. 

• SAT verbal score of 370 or ACT English score of 15 

• SAT math score of 350 or ACT math score of 1 5 

• Freshman Index * of 1680 

• Freshman Index = Combined SAT I scores + (High School Grade Point Average x 500). The high 
school grade point average is calculated only on CPC course work required for admission. 

In addition to meeting two of the above admissions criteria, applicants who graduated, or who 
would have graduated, from high school within the past five years must meet the requirements of 
the college preparatory curriculum (CPC) of the Board of Regents. Applicants applying for fall 
semester 1999 may have no more than two CPC deficiencies to be eligible for admission to the 
university. (See College Preparatory Curriculum Requirements under Regular Admission.) 

An applicant who does not qualify for regular admission will be given the Collegiate Placement 
Examination (CPE) in order to qualify for admission to the university. (A student will be given 
the CPE if the verbal SAT score is less than 460 - ACT English 20 - or the math SAT score is less 
than 430 - ACT math 18.) This examination must be taken before a student can register for classes 
at Armstrong Atlantic. 

Students are required to enroll in learning support courses if their CPE scores fall below either 
the University System of Georgia minimum or the institutional minimum. Students may exit the 
learning support program by earning passing scores on all required parts of the CPE. If any 
required part of the CPE is not passed, students will be required to enroll in the appropriate learning 
support course. Upon successful completion of all required learning support courses and passing 
the CPE, students will exit the learning support areas (English, reading, and math). 

If a required learning support student fails the same learning support course twice, then the 
student is subject to a one year suspension. If a student fails to complete requirements for a learning 
support area within three attempts, the student will be suspended and may not be considered for 
readmission within three years of the suspension. Prior to suspension, the student may be allowed 
to appeal to the departmental review committee for one additional course. Students are limited to 
a total of three attempts in each learning support area, including both required and voluntary 
participation. An "attempt" occurs when a student receives any grade or symbol except W in a 
learning support course, including both required and voluntary participation. 



ADMISSIONS 19 



Students who are required to enroll in learning support classes must have a schedule of classes 
approved by the learning support counselor or an advisor in that department each term the student 
registers. For additional information see Learning Support under Special Programs. 

Special Admission Categories 

Delayed (Non-Traditional) Admission. Delayed (non-traditional) applicants are defined as 
students who: 

• have been out of high school at least five years or whose high school class graduated at least 
five years ago; 

• hold a high school diploma from an accredited or approved high school as specified or have 
satisfactorily completed the GED; 

• have earned fewer than 30 transferable semester hours (45 quarter hours); 

• have not attended college within the past five years (or are in good standing at the last college 
attended, if admitted to that college as non-traditional students). Students who are applying for 
readmission to Armstrong Atlantic are not eligible. 

Applicants admitted as non-traditional students are not required to take the SAT or ACT test, 
or to fulfill the CPC requirements. However, these applicants will be required to take the CPE and 
complete any learning support requirements. 

Early Admission. Armstrong Atlantic State University offers an early admission program for 
students who have completed their junior year in high school and demonstrated outstanding 
academic potential. The criteria for admission to this program are the same as those listed for the 
joint enrollment program. For further information on this program, prospective applicants should 
consult their high school counselors. 

Units of the University System of Georgia are prohibited from accepting transfer credit 
awarded by any college or university to students enrolled in joint high school and college 
enrollment programs unless those students have a minimum SAT score of 970 and a high school 
grade point average of 3.00 (B) on a 4.00 scale. 

International Student Admissions. Admission of international students is based on academic 
admissibility, English proficiency, and proof of financial means to study in the United States. 
International applicants must document their ability to meet the financial requirements for 
attendance as required by U.S. Immigration regulations. It is recommended that international 
students begin their attendance at the university in the fall semester. The university also 
recommends that international students attend an ESL language center prior to enrollment. Please 
contact the admissions office by writing to Armstrong Atlantic State University, International 
Support Services, 11935 Abercorn St., Savannah, GA 31419-1997, or call 912/921-5489 to 
receive an admissions packet or ask questions. 

International students must meet the following requirements before application is made: 

• International students must have completed the equivalent of graduation from a U.S. high 
school. However, college preparatory curriculum (CPC) requirements do not apply to these 
students. 

• Each applicant must have official secondary (high school) or post secondary (college or 
university) credentials, certificates, or diplomas mailed to the international support services 
office at the address above. Official documents must bear authoritative signatures, seals and/ 
or stamps, and should be sent by the institution responsible for issuing such documents. In 
cases where it is impossible for these credentials to be sent from the institution, or only one set 
of originals is available to students, they should forward an "attested" copy of the original. The 
attestation must be done by a proper institution official or by the ministry of education in the 
home country. A certified original translation must accompany all documents not printed in 
English. Transfer applicants with credentials from institutions outside of the U.S. are required 
to have a course by course evaluation from a professional evaluation agency before the) are 
eligible for admission to the university. Please contact the admissions office for an evaluation 
application. 

• All applicants must provide official scores of the Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) or the 
American College Testing Program (ACT). 



20 ARMSTRONG ATLANTIC STATE UNIVERSITY 



• A student whose native language is not English must take the Test of English as a Foreign 
Language (TOEFL) and score a minimum of 500 on the written test (or a minimum of 173 on 
the computer-based TOEFL) for consideration for admission to the university. The TOEFL is 
not a substitution for the SAT or ACT. 

• In addition to meeting the regular admission requirements, international applicants needing 
student visas must show ability to meet financial obligations of tuition, fees, and living 
expenses before Certificates of Eligibility (1-20 AB) and acceptance letters will be issued. 
Current (less than one year old) letters of financial support must accompany the official 
statements of financial resources. Having sufficient funds for the cost of living and educational 
expenses is required by U.S. Immigration regulations. There is no financial aid available for 
international students at Armstrong Atlantic, other than competitive scholarships for which 
students must qualify. International students on non-immigrant visas are not eligible for state 
or federally-funded loans or scholarships in the U.S. 

• Health insurance is mandatory for all international students on non-immigrant visas enrolled 
at Armstrong Atlantic State University. 

After submission of all completed application forms and all required records, the university 
will make an admission decision. If an application is approved, the university will send an 1-20 
form which the international student will use to obtain a student visa. 

Joint Enrollment Admission. Through this program for superior high school juniors and 
seniors, students may complete more than two-thirds of the freshman year of college before 
beginning a regular college career. Students in this program may enroll for college credit in a 
maximum of two courses each term while completing their junior or senior year of high school. 

Students forfeit the privilege of this program if they receive a college course grade below C 
or their high school average in academic courses falls below B in any term. The university will 
consider students for this program only upon written recommendation of their high school 
principals or counselors. 

Applicants must meet freshman admission requirements and the following criteria to be 
eligible for joint enrollment admission: 

• minimum SAT score of 970 (combined verbal and mathematics sections) or the ACT 
composite no less than 21; 

• minimum cumulative high school grade point average of 3.0 or a numerical average of 80 or 
higher in academic subjects; 

• written recommendation from the high school principal or counselor; 

• written consent of parent or guardian (if the student is a minor); 

• completion of the University System of Georgia CPC requirements with the following 
exceptions: 

• Students with SAT verbal scores of at least 530 (or ACT English of at least 23) who have 
not completed the final unit of high school English and/or social studies may be permitted 
to fulfill these high school requirements with the appropriate college courses taken through 
the joint enrollment program. 

• Students who have not completed the CPC requirements may be admitted through the joint 
enrollment program if they are enrolled in the necessary high school courses and scheduled 
to complete the requirements by the end of their senior year. 

With the exception of English and social studies courses taken by students with SAT verbal 
scores of at least 530 (or ACT English of at least 23), college courses may not be used to fulfill 
both high school CPC requirements and college degree requirements. 

Non-Degree Student Admission. Applicants who have never attended college and who wish 
to pursue courses for personal enrichment or advancement may be admitted as non-degree 
students by permission of the director of admissions. To be considered, an applicant must possess 
a high school diploma (or have completed the GED satisfactorily) and have been out of high school 
for a period of seven or more years. 

SAT or ACT tests are not required; however, students must take the CPE. Applicants admitted 
as non-degree students may earn a maximum of ten semester credit hours (including institutional 
credit) before being required to fulfill any learning support requirements. To enter a degree 



ADMISSIONS 21 



program, fulfillment of all beginning freshman requirements is necessary. Non-degree students 
must satisfy all prerequisites before enrolling in courses. 

Outstanding Students Admission. Applicants who demonstrate very high academic ability 
by achieving a composite SAT I (verbal + math) score in the upper five percent of national college- 
bound seniors according to the most recent report from the College Board and who show other 
evidence of college readiness will be admitted as outstanding students. (An ACT score which is 
equivalent to this SAT I score can also be used.) Students admitted under this admissions category 
are not required to meet the Freshman Index admissions requirement. Outstanding students must 
satisfy any CPC deficiencies in areas other than English or mathematics through college level 
course work. 

Post Secondary Options Program. Students who meet the requirements for early admissions 
or joint enrollment admissions and who are enrolled in an accredited public high school may apply 
for the post secondary options program. This program is designed to allow high school students 
the opportunity to enroll in college level courses to satisfy high school requirements while also 
earning college level credit. Students enrolled in this program will have matriculation fees waived 
but must pay all other student fees. Applicants must also submit a post secondary options 
application form before they are accepted into this program. 

Readmission. Students who have not been enrolled at Armstrong Atlantic for three consecu- 
tive semesters must apply for readmission on a form provided by the registrar's office. Former 
students who have not attended another college since leaving Armstrong Atlantic may be 
readmitted, provided they are not on suspension at the time they wish to reenter. Former students 
who have attended another college since leaving Armstrong Atlantic must meet transfer admis- 
sion requirements as listed in the catalog in effect at the time of return. All readmitted students 
must follow semester requirements. 

Readmission of Learning Support Students. After being placed on learning support 
suspension, students who do not take any college work for three years may appeal for readmission 
to the dean of academic and enrollment services. Such students may be retested with the CPE in 
any unsatisfied area and readmitted if they meet the institutional criteria for exemption from all 
areas of learning support. Otherwise, students may appeal for readmission. Students are subject 
to individual evaluation in order to determine whether they have a reasonable chance of success. 
Students who have not been placed on learning support suspension and who have not taken any 
college work for three years are readmitted and then retested with the CPE in any unsatisfied area. 
They may be exempted from all areas of learning support but otherwise are placed according to 
their CPE retest scores. All retested students (if readmitted) have up to three additional attempts 
per learning support area, and are restricted to the twenty hour credit limit including credit hours 
earned during previous enrollments. That is, students who are still required to take a learning 
support course after completing twenty semester hours may register only for required learning 
support courses. 

Transfer Admission 

Applicants who have previously attended regionally accredited institutions of higher educa- 
tion are considered transfer students and must meet transfer admission requirements. 

A transfer applicant who has completed fewer than 30 transferable semester hours (45 quarter 
hours) of core curriculum or whose only attendance has been at a regionally accredited technical 
college in a "Non-College Transfer Program" will be required to meet freshman admission 
requirements (including the submission of official transcripts from each institution attended). 
Applicants who graduated from high school within the past five years are also required to meet 
CPC requirements. Transfer students who transfer from another University System of Georgia 
institution will retain their CPC requirements as determined by the sending institution. 

Transfer applicants will not be considered for admission unless transcripts of the colleges or 
universities last attended indicate academic eligibility to return to those institutions. Any transfer 
applicant who is not academically eligible to return to the last institution attended will be denied 
admission to the university. Transfer applicants may appeal this decision by completing an appeal 



22 ARMSTRONG ATLANTIC STATE UNIVERSITY 



form and submitting this form to the dean of academic and enrollment services. The admissions 
and academic standing committee meets each term to review admission appeals. 

Transfer Admission and Learning Support. Students transferring from institutions outside 
of the University System of Georgia may be required to take the CPE if they have not completed 
30 semester hours of transferable core curriculum courses and have not completed CPC 
requirements. Transfer applicants from within the university system who have learning support 
requirements, but have not yet exited the required areas of learning support, will not be considered 
for admission. Students who have been suspended from Armstrong Atlantic without completing 
learning support requirements are not exempt from these requirements through transfer of course 
credit unless they are eligible for transfer admission under Armstrong Atlantic's regular transfer 
admission policies. 

Academic Standing and Grade Calculations. Armstrong Atlantic's academic standing 
policy will be used to determine an applicant's entering academic standing. Transfer applicants 
who are academically eligible to return to the college or university last attended, yet fall below the 
required overall grade point average as indicated by Armstrong Atlantic's academic standing 
policy, will be admitted on good standing with warning. Transfer students admitted to the 
university by permission of the admissions and academic standing committee will enter on 
academic probation. 

To be eligible for continued enrollment, all transfer students are expected to maintain or exceed 
the required overall grade point average as indicated by Armstrong Atlantic's academic standing 
policy. For details, see Academic Standing in the section on Academic Policies and Programs. 

All previous college credit is included in the calculation of a student's overall grade point 
average at Armstrong Atlantic State University (including D and F grades). Letter grades transfer 
at face value. Armstrong Atlantic does not recognize + or - indicators when transferring credit 
from another institution. Incomplete grades also transfer and remain as grades of I until grade 
changes to remove them are received from previous institutions, until courses are repeated, or until 
previous institutions indicate that their policies include no penalties for incompletes. I grades will 
revert to Fs in accordance with university policy if not resolved by midterm of the second term 
of attendance at Armstrong Atlantic. College credit is not awarded for pre-college-level and 
remedial courses, courses taken for diploma or certification purposes, continuing education 
courses, or vocational courses. Transfer quarter hours will be converted to semester hours at a ratio 
of 1:1.5 (i.e., 5 quarter hours will convert to 3.3 semester hours). 

Awarding of Transfer Credit. The university makes every effort to transfer credit for 
academic work completed at other institutions. All transfer applicants must provide the admis- 
sions office with an official transcript of all credit earned at all previously attended colleges or 
universities, regardless of the transferability of credits. Official evaluations of acceptable college 
credit awarded will be mailed to transfer students when official transcripts have been received 
from all institutions previously attended. Student transfer evaluation will be completed prior to 
or during the student's first term of attendance. Transfer credit may be accepted from degree 
granting institutions that are accredited at the collegiate level by their appropriate regional 
accrediting agency. No transfer credit will be awarded from institutions not regionally accredited. 
Students may appeal individual course decisions. 

An applicant transferring from an institution which is not a member of a regional accrediting 
agency must achieve a C average on his or her first fifteen semester hours of work at Armstrong 
Atlantic in order to be eligible to continue. At that point, the student may request a review of prior 
credit earned at a non-accredited institution as it would apply to a chosen degree program. This 
review process begins in the registrar's office. In certain areas, students may be required to 
validate credits by examination. In computing cumulative grade point averages, only the work 
attempted at Armstrong Atlantic will be considered. 

Credit earned at an accredited technical college may not transfer unless the credit earned 
equates an associate degree (lower division) course. This transfer practice may be further defined 
by specific articulation agreements with individual technical schools or systems. 

Armstrong Atlantic State University reserves the right to refuse to accept any or all of the 
credits from any high school or other institution, notwithstanding its accredited status, when the 



ADMISSIONS 



23 



university determines through investigation or otherwise that the quality of instruction at such 
high school or institution is, for any reason, deficient or unsatisfactory. The judgment of the 
university on this question will be final. 

Meeting Degree Requirements. Transfer students must meet all applicable requirements 
under the section on General Degree Requirements to graduate from Armstrong Atlantic State 
University. 

If core curriculum requirements in areas A,B,C,D, or E have been completed at another 
University System of Georgia institution, each completed area will be accepted as having met the 
respective area requirement at Armstrong Atlantic. A department may require a student to enroll 
in a core course that is required for a specific major if that course was not taken to satisfy the core 
area requirement. 

Transfer students who have not yet completed the required English composition courses in area 
A of the core curriculum should make an appointment to meet with the composition coordinator 
for an English placement interview prior to first registration. The coordinator will assist the 
student in determining placement in the appropriate composition course(s), evaluating other 
English course credits, and reviewing the Regents' Test requirement. 

Transfer students from outside the University System of Georgia must exhibit satisfactory 
knowledge of Georgia government through a test on Georgia's constitution and government or by 
satisfactorily completing an equivalent course. This test is given on campus every term. 
Completion of a course in American government does not satisfy this requirement. 

Credit by Examination 

Armstrong Atlantic State University may grant up to one-fourth of the credit required in a 
college degree for the examinations and scores below: 



Advanced Placement (AP) 

Biology - 4 

Calculus AB - 3 

Calculus BC - 3 

Chemistry - 3 

Computer Science AB - 3 

English: Language and Composition or 

Literature and Composition - 3 
French Language or French Literature - 3 
German Language - 3 
History-United States - 3 
Latin - 3 
Spanish Language or Spanish Literature - 3 

SAT II: Subject Tests 

American History - national average 

Regents College Examinations 

Statistics - 45 



College-Level Examination Program 
(CLEP) 

History of the United States I - 47 
History of the United States II - 46 
Analyzing and Interpreting Literature 

with Essay - 50 
Calculus with Elementary Functions - 45 
College Algebra - 50 
College Algebra-Trigonometry - 54 
College-Level French Language - 42C 
College-Level German Language - 36C 
College-Level Spanish Language - 45C 
Freshman College Composition 

with Essay - 49 
Humanities - 450 
Introductory Sociology - 47 
Natural Sciences - 450 

DANTES Subject Tests 

Criminal Justice - 49 
General Anthropology - 47 



24 ARMSTRONG ATLANTIC STATE UNIVERSITY 



These guidelines are subject to change without notice. Academic departments select exami- 
nations and determine passing scores which follow the test titles. The letter C following a score 
denotes conditional credit and means that an additional requirement must be satisfied before credit 
hours will be awarded. For example, the award of credit for the college-level Spanish language 
is contingent upon passing the next course in sequence with a C or better. The credit hours awarded 
are the same as those earned by students who complete the equivalent course(s). The letter grade 
K is used to identify credit by examination and has no effect on the academic grade point average. 
The registrar's office adds courses and credit hours to the academic records of enrolled students. 
A brochure published by the Division of Student Affairs lists equivalent courses, any conditions 
for award of credit, and test dates. 

For additional information, please make inquiry to the admissions office or the Division of 
Student Affairs. 

College Credit for Military Experience and Training 

Transfer applicants who wish to have their military experience and training evaluated for 
college credit should consult with advisors in their major departments to determine if credit for 
military experience is appropriate and applicable to specific degree program requirements. 
Students should present official documentation of experience and training (Army/American 
Council on Education Registry — AARTS — transcript for US Army personnel, and Community 
College of the Air Force transcript for Air Force personnel) to the admissions office and their 
academic advisors for evaluation of degree-related experience and/or training. 

Based on a minimum of one year of continuous active duty, veterans may receive three 
semester hours of credit for physical education activities. Veterans should submit a DD Form 214 
and active duty personnel should submit a DD Form 295 to the admissions office for verification. 

Certificate Programs 

Armstrong Atlantic State University offers several certificate programs that have specific 
admission requirements in addition to those of the university. Please refer to the appropriate area 
in this catalog for details. 

• Basic law enforcement certificate — see Special Programs. 

• Gerontology certificate — see Department of Health Science. 

• Post baccalaureate medical technology certificate — see Department of Medical Technology. 

• Post baccalaureate radiation therapy certificate — see Department of Radiologic Sciences. 

External Degree Programs 

Applicants who wish to earn a degree from Armstrong Atlantic State University through the 
external degree programs must meet all admission requirements. External degree sites include the 
Brunswick Center on the campus of the Coastal Georgia Community College in Brunswick and 
the Liberty Center on the Fort Stewart U.S. Army Post in Hinesville. 

Brunswick Center 

Criteria for Admission. Anyone who has completed an associate degree or its equivalent is 
eligible for admission to Brunswick Center programs and courses. Moreover, Coastal Georgia 
Community College students who have sophomore standing and meet certain requirements, 
including completion of all core curriculum English requirements and Regents ' Test passage, may 
be admitted to Brunswick Center classes taught by the senior colleges and universities. Anyone 
who already has a baccalaureate degree also may be admitted as a non-degree student to take 
courses, particularly for teacher certification. 



1 



ADMISSIONS 25 



Admission Procedures. Prospective students must apply for admission to Armstrong Atlantic 
State University and meet all admission requirements for that institution. The admission applica- 
tion process is handled through the Brunswick Center Office; the completed application and all 
transcripts of previous college work must be sent for preliminary processing to the Brunswick 
Center, which will then send the documents to the Armstrong Atlantic admissions office. 

After Admission. Once admitted to Armstrong Atlantic State University or either of the other 
consortium institutions, students are allowed to take courses offered through the Brunswick 
Center by all three institutions. The senior institutions accept all course work done through the 
Brunswick Center as resident credit. Upper level courses taken by Coastal Georgia Community 
College students will be applied toward their baccalaureate degrees. The director of the Brunswick 
Center serves as the initial advisor, meeting with each student to outline an overall program as well 
as to plan a schedule every semester. Registration for the Brunswick Center is done through the 
center's office at the time of Coastal Georgia Community College registration. Students are 
encouraged to participate in preregistration for the next semester. Graduation requirements for 
each degree are set by Armstrong Atlantic State University. Armstrong Atlantic's registrar and 
appropriate department heads certify each candidate for graduation. Brunswick Center students 
have full use of the Coastal Georgia Community College's library and other support services. 

Fees. A $20 processing fee must accompany each application for admission to Armstrong 
Atlantic State University. Tuition fees for both senior college courses and junior college courses 
are collected at the current rates set by the University System Board of Regents. Senior college 
students taking four or more semester hours at Coastal Georgia Community College also must pay 
student activity and athletic fees at this institution. Tuition fees are paid to Coastal Georgia 
Community College. 

Financial Aid. Students seeking financial aid should make application through the financial 
aid office of their home institution. Financial aid application forms for Armstrong Atlantic State 
University may be obtained from the Brunswick Center office. 

Honors Program 

Entering students may apply to the honors program if they score 1 100 on the SAT and graduate 
with a 3.2 grade point average on a 4.0 scale. Students scoring 3 or better on each of three advanced 
placement examinations of the College Board are also eligible to apply. 

Continuing students may apply to enter the honors program if they have at least a 3.2 overall 
grade point average in university course work and are either enrolled in or have completed an 
honors course. Honors courses in the core are open to all students who meet the published 
prerequisites. 

Regents Engineering Transfer Program (RETP) 

The Regents Engineering Transfer Program at Armstrong Atlantic State University provides 
two access points for admission. First, at the time of admission to Armstrong Atlantic, the student 
must have achieved a minimum composite SAT score of 1090, with a math SAT of at least 560, 
and a 3.0 high school grade point average. However, any student who has been admitted to an 
engineering program at Georgia Tech on the basis of his or her academic record can enter 
Armstrong Atlantic as a RETP student even if the above requirements are not met. 

Students at Armstrong Atlantic who do not qualify for admission to the RETP under the terms 
of the previous paragraph, but want to join the program at the end of the freshman year, must fulfill 
the following criteria: completion of MATH 1 161 and 2072 with grades of B or better, completion 
of CHEM 1211 and 1212 with grades of B or better, and a college grade point average of 3.0. 

Regents Engineering Transfer Program students must be U.S. citizens with Georgia residency. 
RETP students who satisfactorily complete the pre-engineering curriculum and apply for transfer 
will be accepted to Georgia Tech. 



26 ARMSTRONG ATLANTIC STATE UNIVERSITY 



Georgia Tech Regional Engineering Program (GTREP) 

Beginning with the freshman class of fall 1999, Armstrong Atlantic engineering students may 
complete the bachelor of science degrees in civil engineering and computer engineering from the 
Georgia Institute of Technology without leaving Savannah. Students will complete their 
first two years in Armstrong Atlantic's engineering studies program. The balance of the 
program will be delivered by Georgia Tech via distance learning and Georgia Tech faulty 
reassigned to Savannah. Admission requirements are the same as those for the RETP listed 
above. Out of state students are eligible for GTREP. Additional current information may be 
found at http://www.engineering.armstrong.edu. 

Sixty-Two Plus Program 

Sixty-two Plus is an Armstrong Atlantic program of life-long learning for senior citizens. 
Those who are at least 62 years of age may enroll in credit courses on a space-available basis 
without payment of fees, except for books, supplies, laboratory or special course fees. They must 
be residents of Georgia and must present a birth certificate (or comparable written documentation 
of age) to enable the admissions office to determine eligibility. In addition, individuals in the 62 
Plus program must meet all admission and degree requirements. Information about this program 
may be obtained from the adult academic services office. Once 62 Plus students have earned ten 
semester hours (including institutional credit), they will be required to fulfill any learning support 
requirements. 

SOCAD Program 

Active duty military personnel and their dependents may elect to attend Armstrong Atlantic 
State University under the provisions of the SOCAD Agreement. Applicants who have an active 
student agreement with another SOCAD institution should meet Armstrong Atlantic's admission 
requirements for transient students. The student agreement will serve as the transient letter. 
Applicants who wish to earn a degree from Armstrong Atlantic State University under the SOCAD 
provisions must meet either freshmen or transfer admission requirements. 

Veterans Affairs Program 

After having been accepted at Armstrong Atlantic State University and upon receipt of 
certification of eligibility and entitlement from the Veterans Administration, veterans may attend 
under Public Law 358 (Veterans Readjustment Benefit Act of 1966), Public Law 815 (Disabled), 
Public Law 894 (Disabled), Public Law 634 (War Orphans), or Public Law 631 (Children of 
Permanently Disabled Veterans). Students under Public Laws 358, 631, and 634 should be 
prepared to pay tuition and fees at the time of registration. Veterans must have received 
notification of acceptance to the university prior to contacting the veteran affairs office to begin 
certification of eligibility process. 

Vocational Rehabilitation Applicant Program 

Applicants sponsored by vocational rehabilitation or other community agencies must apply 
at least six weeks before the beginning of any semester to insure proper processing of applications. 

Graduate Admissions 

Graduate program specific admission requirements are listed in the Armstrong Atlantic State 
University Graduate Catalog. 






ADMISSIONS 27 



Acceptance to the University 

Applicants must provide evidence of academic success in order to be admitted to Armstrong 
Atlantic State University. 

The university reserves the right to review any and all related documentation and employ 
appropriate means to assess the suitability of applicants for enrollment in the university. 
Acceptance or denial of admission to the university will be based upon the results of this review. 

The university may require any applicant to appear for a personal interview and to take any 
achievement, aptitude, and psychological tests deemed necessary to make a decision regarding the 
applicant's qualification for admission to the university. 

The director of admissions determines final acceptance or denial of each application. 
Admission decisions are subject to the applicant's right of appeal to the admissions and academic 
standing committee prior to the beginning of the desired term of entry. The committee will review 
appeals and make recommendations to the president of the university, who will render a decision. 
The university reserves the right to withdraw admission before or after enrollment if the student 
becomes ineligible as determined by the standards of the university or board of regents. 

The university reserves the right to reject an applicant who is not a resident of Georgia. All 
students enrolled at Armstrong Atlantic State University are required to abide by the provisions 
of the honor code. 

Admission to the university does not guarantee admission to teacher educa- 
tion programs. Additional requirements are listed in the College of Education 
section of this catalog. 

Admission to the university does not guarantee admission to health profes- 
sions programs. Specific admission requirements are given in the departmental 
listings in the College of Health Professions section of this catalog. 



28 ARMSTRONG ATLANTIC STATE UNIVERSITY 



Expenses and Fees 



Expenses 



Principal expenses and regulations concerning the payment of fees are described herewith. 
Fees and other charges are subject to change without notice. When such changes are made, notice 
will be given as far in advance as possible. Expenses are in the form of tuition, nonresident tuition, 
student services fees and other special fees. Fees of all students are due and payable at time of 
registration; registration is not complete until all fees have been paid. 

Tuition and Required Fees (Per Semester Hours) 

At press time for this catalog, the University System Board of Regents had not yet set fees 
(undergraduate and graduate, resident and non-resident) for the 1999-2000 academic year. 
Information sheets listing tuition and required fees will be available in the registrar's office on 
June 1 , 1999. Fees are charged at either the undergraduate or graduate rate based upon the student 
classification in the computerized student information system. Non-resident tuition is charged to 
students who are not classified as Georgia residents. 

• Students in specified courses, for example, applied music or scuba diving, may be subject to 
additional fees. 

• Non-resident tuition is waived for active duty military personnel and their dependents 
stationed in Georgia (except military personnel assigned to this institution for educational 
purposes). Documentation must be presented to the registrar's office. 

• On-campus students pay an activity fee and an athletic fee each semester, regardless of the 
number of hours enrolled. 

• Students registered only for off-campus courses do not pay student activity or athletic fees. 
Students registered for a combination of on- and off-campus courses do pay student activity 
and athletic fees. 

• Tuition and fees are waived for Georgia residents who present to the registrar' s office written 
documentation that they are 62 years of age or older. 

• Contact the registrar's office for detailed fee information. 

Regents' Policies Governing Residency Requirements 

To be considered a legal resident of Georgia, the applicant must establish the following facts 
to the satisfaction of the registrar. 

• If a person is 1 8 years of age or older, he or she may register as an in-state student only upon 
a showing that he or she has been a legal resident of Georgia for a period of at least twelve 
months immediately preceding the date of registration. 

• No emancipated minor or other person 1 8 years of age or older shall be deemed to have gained 
or acquired in-state status for tuition purposes while attending any educational institution in 
this state, in the absence of a clear demonstration that he or she has in fact established legal 
residence in this state. 

• If a person is under 18 years of age, he or she may register as an in-state student only upon a 
showing that his or her supporting parent or guardian has been a legal resident of Georgia for 
a period of at least twelve months immediately preceding the date of registration. 

• If a parent or legal guardian of a minor changes his or her legal residence to another state 
following a period of legal residence in Georgia, the minor may continue to take courses for 
a period of twelve consecutive months on the payment of in-state tuition. After the expiration 
of the twelve month period, the student may continue his or her registration only upon the 
payment of fees at the non-resident rate. 

• In the event that a legal resident of Georgia is appointed as guardian of a non-resident minor, 
such minor will not be permitted to register as a resident student until the expiration of one year 



FINANCIAL INFORMATION 29 



from the date of court appointment, and then only upon a proper showing that such appointment 
was not made to avoid payment of the non-resident fees. 

• Aliens shall be classified as non-resident students provided, however, that an alien who is 
living in this country under an immigration document permitting indefinite or permanent 
residence shall have the same privilege of qualifying for resident tuition as a citizen of the 
United States. 

Waivers 

An institution may waive non-resident tuition for: 

• non-resident students who are financially dependent upon parents or spouses who have been 
legal residents of Georgia for at least twelve consecutive months immediately preceding the 
date of registration; provided, however, that such financial dependence shall have existed for 
at least twelve consecutive months immediately preceding the date of registration. 

• international students, selected by the institutional president or his or her authorized represen- 
tative, provided that the number of such waivers in effect does not exceed one percent of the 
equivalent full-time students enrolled at the institution in the fall semester immediately 
preceding the semester for which the out-of-state tuition is to be waived. 

• full-time employees of the university system, their spouses, and their dependent children. 

• full-time teachers in the public schools of Georgia or in the programs of the state board of 
technical and adult education and their dependent children. Teachers employed full-time on 
military bases in Georgia shall also qualify for this waiver. 

• career consular officers and their dependents who are citizens of the foreign nation which their 
consular office represents, and who are stationed and living in Georgia under orders of their 
respective governments. This waiver shall apply only to those consular officers whose nations 
operate on the principle of educational reciprocity with the United States. 

• military personnel and their dependents stationed in Georgia and on active duty unless such 
military personnel are assigned as students to system institutions for educational purposes. 

• students who are legal residents of non-resident counties bordering on Georgia counties in 
which an institution of the university system is located and who are enrolled in said institution. 

Residency Reclassification 

Students are responsible for registering under the proper residency classification. A student 
classified as a non-resident who believes that he or she is entitled to be reclassified as a legal 
resident may petition the registrar for a change in status. The petition must be filed no later than 
sixty (60) days after the term begins in order for the student to be considered for reclassification 
for the term. If the petition is granted, reclassification will not be retroactive to prior semesters. 
Petition forms are available in the registrar's office. 

Student Housing and Food Service 

Students wishing to live in the dormitory must submit the Armstrong Atlantic housing 
application and a $100 deposit to the student affairs office. Contact student affairs for general 
housing information and the financial services office for additional financial information. Refer 
to the housing contract for specific terms and conditions. 

Resident Hall Fees Per Semester. Fees shown include food service of $900.00 per semester. 

Single (no roommate): $2,534.00 

Double (with roommate): $2,200.00 

Per Night Rate (without meals): $20.00 

Other Special Costs 

Application Fee (Non-Refundable): $20.00 

Must accompany initial application. Acceptance of application fees does not constitute 
acceptance of applicants. 



30 ARMSTRONG ATLANTIC STATE UNIVERSITY 



Exit Exam Fees: 

Announced in test bulletins. 
Graduation Fee (Non-Refundable): $41 .00 

Payable by each candidate for graduation when graduation application is submitted (two 
semesters prior to graduation). If candidate is receiving a second degree at the same graduation 
ceremonies, an additional $5.00 is due. The full $41.00 is charged for a second degree awarded 
at a subsequent graduation ceremony. A fee of $20.00 is charged for each replacement diploma. 

Medical Technology Deposit (Non-Refundable): $50.00 

Radiologic Sciences Deposit (Non-Refundable): $50.00 

Dental Hygiene Deposit (Non-Refundable): $100.00 

Physical Therapy Deposit (Non-Refundable): $250.00 

For accepted applicants to retain their position in the program (may be applied to first semester 
matriculation fees). 
Late Registration Fee (Non-Refundable): $42.00 

Charged to students who register after the registration period. 

Music Fees 

Applied music courses consist of one twenty-five minute private lesson per week (MUSC 1 300) 
or one fifty minute private lesson per week (MUSC 1400, 2400, 3400, 4400). A special fee of $90.00 
is charged for students enrolled in MUSC 1 300. A special fee of $ 1 80.00 is assessed for MUSC 1 400- 
4400 to music majors enrolled for less than 1 2 hours and to students who are not music majors. Music 
majors may enroll, at no charge, for one applied music course from MUSC 1400-4400. Additional 
applied music courses will be assessed a special fee at the non-music major rate. 

The applied music fee is refundable only if the student does not meet the first scheduled lesson. 

Teacher Education Practicum Fee 

Students admitted to teacher education programs in the College of Education after August 20, 
1998 are required to pay a $250.00 student teaching/internship fee (to be submitted with student 
teaching or internship application). 

Continuing Education Courses (Non-Credit) 

Fees are announced every semester for courses scheduled (fees vary with courses). Students who 
formally withdraw from a continuing education course, short course, workshop, or conference up 
to twenty-four hours prior to the first class meeting will receive a full refund of fees paid. No refunds 
will be made for withdrawals after the first class meeting. Fees paid for courses or conferences 
canceled by the office of continuing education will be refunded 100%. Refund checks will be mailed 
approximately four weeks after the approved withdrawal form is received by financial services. 

Refund Policy 

Refund of tuition and fees may be requested only upon written application for withdrawal from 
school. The withdrawal form should be completed in the office of student affairs. No Refunds 
Will Be Made to Students Dropping Courses. Refunds for withdrawals, academic suspension, 
and canceled classes will be available at the cashier' s office starting the ninth week of the semester. 
They will be mailed if not picked up by the eleventh week of the semester. 

Refund schedule: 

Withdrawal Date Refund Percentage 

Prior to and on the first day of class 100% 
Second day of class and before 

end of first 10% of enrollment 90% 
After first 10% of enrollment through the 

end of first 25% of enrollment 50% 
After first 25% of enrollment through the 

end of first 50% of enrollment 25% 

After 50% of enrollment None 



FINANCIAL INFORMATION 31 



Enrollment is defined as the scheduled number of official class days for that semester. Refunds 
are based on the withdrawal date of the semester's class days, not how many times individual 
classes have met. 

Students attending the university for the first time who receive assistance under Title IV of the 
Higher Education Act of 1965 as amended are entitled to a pro-rata refund of that portion of the 
tuition, fees, room, board, and other charges, based on that portion of the enrollment period which 
remains on the last day of attendance by the student, up to the 60% point (in time) in the enrollment 
period. 

Refund of all semester non-resident tuition, tuition, and other mandatory fees shall be made 
in the event of the death of a student at any time during an academic semester. 

Summer Term Refunds. Due to the varying lengths of courses offered during the summer, 
refunds are based upon individual course length. Due to the multiple lengths of summer term 
classes, refunds for withdrawals and canceled classes will be mailed at the end of the semester. 

Dormitory Deposit Refunds. Refunds of the dorm deposit (less damages) will be available 
four weeks after financial services is notified by student affairs. 

Returned Check Policy 

Students whose checks are returned to the university unpaid by their banks will be notified by 
the financial services office to pay the amount due. Students whose checks were used for bookstore 
and other purchases will be assessed a service charge of $25.00 or 5% of the check, whichever is 
greater. Students whose checks were used for tuition and fees will be assessed the service charge 
plus the late registration fee. Checks returned because of bank errors will be redeposited after 
written notification is received from the bank and a $25.00 service charge is paid by the student. 
No late registration fee is assessed for checks returned because of a bank error. Students should 
request reimbursement of service charges from their banks. Placement of a stop payment on a 
check does not constitute formal withdrawal from the university and is considered a returned 
check. Legal means will be used to collect returned checks. Writing a non-sufficient funds check 
or stopping payment on a check does not cancel registration. Students whose checks are returned 
for non-sufficient funds or who stop payment on a check must honor the check and pay the service 
charges before withdrawing from school. After honoring a returned or stop-payment check and 
formally withdrawing in the Division of Student Affairs, students will receive any refund due as 
a result of official withdrawal. 

Payments 

Students who participate in advanced registration, registration, or late registration may use 
credit cards (VISA and MasterCard) to pay tuition. Make payments at the front desk in the lobby 
of the Administration Building. Partial payments, i.e., part credit card and part cash or check, are 
not accepted. The person whose credit card is being used to pay tuition must be present to sign the 
charge slip. 

Cash and check payments are accepted at the cashier' s window in the Administration Building. 
Drop boxes are also available for check payments. Checks sent by mail should be made payable 
to Armstrong Atlantic State University and addressed to Financial Services - Tuition Payments, 
Armstrong Atlantic State University, 11935 Abercorn Street, Savannah, GA 31419. Students' 
social security numbers should be listed on checks. Only checks drawn on U.S. banks will be 
accepted. 

Your registration schedule/bill must be presented when paying in person, or attached when 
mailing payment or using the drop boxes. Dormitory students can use the drop box procedure for 
dorm payments by check and should specify as such on their checks. 

The total amount due on the schedule/bill (including encumbrances) must be paid in 
order for the university to accept payment. (Encumbrances are other debts owed to the 
university by students.) Only full payments will be accepted. If you are making a partial payment 
by check and the rest by cash, you must go to the cashier's window or table with both check and 



32 ARMSTRONG ATLANTIC STATE UNIVERSITY 



cash. Students who have financial aid and pay the balance with cash or check must pay their fees 
at the cashier's table during regular registration. Students who mail their schedule/bill and check 
to financial services cannot be guaranteed enrollment unless their payment is sent by registered 
mail and is received by financial services by the appropriate deadline. 

Checks submitted with old schedule/bills, without schedule/bills, in amounts less than 
total fees due, incompletely filled out checks, counter checks, two-party checks, or post- 
dated checks will be mailed back to students. Do not submit a check that you know will be 
returned by your bank. Payments for returned checks will be accepted only in cash, cashier's 
check, or money order. 

Financial Obligations 

Any student delinquent in the payment of any financial obligation to the university will have 
grade reports and transcripts of records withheld. Grade reports and transcripts will not be 
released, nor will the student be allowed to register at the university, until all financial obligations 
are met. Fees for each semester are to be paid in full at the time of registration. 

Financial Aid Student Payment 

Students who have financial aid will have their aid applied directly to the student account. This 
will be done periodically throughout the semester as a student's aid is approved. "Difference" 
checks (results of financial aid less tuition and other fees) will be available weekly throughout the 
semester as financial aid is processed. 

Students who do not pre-register or do not complete financial aid paperwork on time will have 
their "difference" checks delayed. In order to receive "difference" checks as soon as possible, 
students must participate in advance registration and have all financial aid paperwork 
completed on time. 

To pick up difference checks, students must have a valid photo ID with their social security 
number. A driver's license or student ID is acceptable. Students whose driver's license number 
does not match that of their social security number must have a social security card. Difference 
checks will be mailed if not picked up after two weeks. 

Financial aid students who register in advance, but whose aid does not exceed fees, should 
submit the remaining payment on registration day. Financial aid students who register and do not 
attend classes will have their aid applied and receive a grade. If their charges exceed aid, they will 
be billed for the unpaid amount. Financial aid students who register and decide not to attend classes 
should formally withdraw from school in the Division of Student Affairs. 

Students whose financial aid is not completed prior to registration should be prepared to pay 
fees themselves and be reimbursed later in the semester. 

Brunswick/Liberty Center Financial Policies 

Cash payments are not accepted. Mail personal checks, cashier's checks, or money orders to 
Armstrong Atlantic in official envelope along with your schedule/bill. Payments must be received 
by Armstrong Atlantic within three working days after registration. Make checks payable to 
AASU, or Armstrong Atlantic State University. 

Students who participate in advance registration, registration, or late registration may use 
credit cards (VISA or MasterCard) to pay tuition. Partial payments, i.e., part credit card/part cash 
or check, are not accepted. Call 912/927-5275 or 912/927-521 1 for further information. 

Financial Aid Students. If the amount due on your schedule/bill is a negative number, a 
difference check will be mailed to you. If you still owe an amount, follow check/credit card 
procedures. If your payment is not received by Armstrong Atlantic within three working days, 
your enrollment will not be completed. 

Refund Policy. Refund of tuition and fees may be requested only upon written application for 
withdrawal. The withdrawal form should be completed by the student affairs office at 912/927- 
5271. No refunds will be made to students dropping a course. Refunds for withdrawals, 
academic suspension, and canceled courses will be mailed starting the ninth week of the semester. 



FINANCIAL INFORMATION 33 



Refunds are not made for late registration fees or graduation fees. Refund checks are payable to 
the student regardless of who paid the fees. 

General Guidelines 

• Students enrolled at Armstrong Atlantic or Savannah State who pay the maximum tuition and 
fees amount may be eligible to take one course at the other institution at no charge. Consult with 
the registrar's office regarding program details and the required documentation before 
registration. 

• After payment of fees, application of financial aid to fees, or application of support by outside 
agencies, there are no adjustments for dropping a course. 

• No fee deferments or payment plans are available. All tuition and fees are due at registration 
per the guidelines of the Board of Regents of the University System of Georgia. 

• Students whose fees are paid by financial aid and who withdraw from school will have refunds 
returned to the payment source based upon federal regulations and university policy. 

• Students who add a class, do not pay the additional fees, and do not officially drop the course, 
will be billed for the course and will receive a grade. 

• The university reserves the right to apply all payments or financial aid to any unpaid student 
balances. 

• Brunswick and Liberty Center students should consult with center staffs for specific guidelines 
and procedures. 

• Financial aid students who enroll for hours different from their aid-based hours will not receive 
any difference check until late in the semester. 



34 ARMSTRONG ATLANTIC STATE UNIVERSITY 



Financial Aid 



General Information 



The financial aid office is especially concerned with students who need financial assistance to 
attend Armstrong Atlantic State University. The primary responsibility for financing college 
education rests with students and their families. Financial aid is available to supplement family 
contributions and is provided through a combination of sources including scholarships, grants, 
loans, and part-time employment. Either the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) 
or the Renewal FAFSA must be used to help determine eligibility for the HOPE Scholarship, Pell 
Grants, Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant (SEOG), and student loans. Family 
income, assets, number of family members, number in college, and other factors determine 
eligibility. The university will attempt to assist students with the difference between the total 
expected family contribution and the cost of attending college. Any student admitted to, or 
attending, Armstrong Atlantic State University is encouraged to apply for financial aid. 

Student financial aid is most frequently awarded to eligible students on the basis of need or 
merit. Merit is determined by the entity who is providing the money to be awarded (for example, 
the state of Georgia, Armstrong Atlantic State University, private donors). The federal govern- 
ment determines need based on information in the completed FAFSA through analysis of the data 
provided by the student's family or, if independent, by the student. This analysis is transmitted to 
the financial aid office where it is compared with the cost of education. The formula applied is: 
cost of education minus expected family contribution equals need (COE - EFC = Need). If the 
family contribution is less than the cost of education, financial need has been established. 

In general, students who apply by the priority deadline (March 15) are more likely to receive 
some type of financial assistance than those who apply after the deadline. Due to the fact that 
certain funds are limited, the financial aid office will award its yearly allocation of those funds to 
students who meet the priority deadline and demonstrate the greatest need. Therefore, students are 
encouraged to apply as early in the year as possible. 

The financial aid office is interested in helping students find ways to finance their education. 
However, the application and awards process is heavily regulated by federal and state law, and as 
a result the process takes time. As many as thirty percent of Armstrong Atlantic State University 
students may be selected for a process called verification. Armstrong Atlantic's financial aid 
office does not know who will be selected at the time students apply for aid. All students should 
be prepared to supply signed copies of their 1998 federal income tax returns and a completed 
verification worksheet to the financial aid office. Students who are not considered independent by 
the federal government would also need to submit signed copies of their parents' 1998 federal 
income tax returns. The financial aid office may also require a number of other documents before 
aid can be awarded. Please respond quickly and accurately to any and all requests for documen- 
tation from the financial aid office. 

Only by meeting the March 1 5 priority deadline can students expect to have funds available 
at the beginning of fall semester. Students who do not meet this deadline will be required to pay 
their own fees for fall semester 1999. Please keep in mind that although we are here to help you, 
we are not responsible for delays caused by inaccurate or incomplete applications and files. 

Application Information 

An applicant for student financial aid must: 

• be enrolled or accepted for enrollment at Armstrong Atlantic State University; 

• complete and submit a signed FAFSA or Renewal FAFSA to the central processor; 

• complete and submit other forms as requested by the financial aid office. 

Students are eligible to apply for financial assistance provided they are making satisfactory 
academic progress and meeting the requirements of the program(s) from which assistance is 
sought. Transient students, exchange students, and those enrolled in continuing education classes 



FINANCIAL INFORMATION 35 



are not eligible for financial aid. Students are required to adhere to all regulations and requirements 
of the program from which they receive assistance and to notify the financial aid office of any 
changes in status which may affect their aid eligibility. 

The minimum number of semester hours for which a financial aid recipient may enroll per 
semester varies from program to program. Some require at least 12 hours per semester (full-time 
status). Many programs require that the student be enrolled at least half-time, taking 6 or more 
semester hours (6 hours of graduate level classes, for graduate students). 

• You must complete a renewal application or FAFSA to apply for grants, loans, and the HOPE 
Scholarship every year. 

• Students should apply either by mail or on the world wide web - not both. 

For detailed information about Armstrong Atlantic financial aid, visit our web site at http:// 
www.finaid.armstrong.edu. For federal student aid information call 1-800-433-3243 and request 
The Student Guide from the U.S. Department of Education. 

Paper Renewal Applications. Beginning in November of every year, the Department of 
Education mails renewal applications to students who applied for aid for that academic year. 
Renewal applications are sent directly to student addresses on file with the federal processor. If 
you have moved since applying for aid for the previous year, the post office will not forward your 
application to you. Selected students do not receive renewal applications because of the manner 
in which they last applied for aid. If you have not received your renewal application by January 
15, you should complete and submit a regular FAFSA for the coming year. The federal processor 
will not respond to requests for renewal application forms from either schools or students. 

Electronic Renewal Applications. Students who apply via the world wide web will be sent 
an electronic access code (EAC) to be used at the FAFSA web site (http://www.fafsa.ed.gov) to 
access and complete a renewal application for the coming year. 

Deadlines 

March 15 Fall semester priority deadline for submitting the completed and signed 

FAFSA or Renewal FAFSA to the central processor. 

April 15 Fall semester deadline for submitting all supporting documentation re- 

quested by the financial aid office. 

August 1 Spring semester priority deadline for submitting the completed and signed 

FAFSA or Renewal FAFSA to the central processor. 

September 1 Spring semester deadline for submitting all supporting documentation 
requested by the financial aid office. 

March 1 Summer semester priority deadline for submitting the completed and 

signed FAFSA or Renewal FAFSA to the central processor. 

April 1 Summer semester deadline for submitting all supporting documentation 

requested by the financial aid office. 

Students who miss these deadlines must be prepared to pay their own fees. Students must 
apply for financial aid every year. Awards are made only for the current year. 

Disbursement of Financial Aid 

Disbursement of financial aid for preregistered students will begin on registration day every 
semester. Students who do not preregister will have to wait approximately ten days before 
difference checks are available. Aid offered on the award letter is based on full-time status unless 
otherwise indicated, and may be adjusted depending on hours enrolled. Financial aid will only 
be disbursed to students who have received, signed, and returned their award letter and 
ALL enclosed documentation to the financial aid office. 

Work study funds are earned on an hourly basis and are only paid for work performed. Funds 
from this program are not available for registration. 



36 ARMSTRONG ATLANTIC STATE UNIVERSITY 



Grants 

Students are not required to repay these awards. 

Federal Pell Grant. Open to eligible undergraduates based on need and enrollment status. 
Grant awarded is based on full-time enrollment; if a student enrolls in fewer than the number of 
hours considered full-time, funds will be reduced accordingly. 

Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant (SEOG). Open to eligible under- 
graduate students. Awards based on need and available to students who meet the March 15 
deadline. Funds are awarded on the basis of funds availability, on a first-come, first-served basis. 

Employment 

Students in either program may not exceed nineteen hours of work per week, and regulations 
allow only one position per student. 

Federal College Work Study Program. This federally sponsored program is awarded based 
on need and availability. Students are awarded a specific dollar amount, and may earn up to this 
maximum each quarter. 

Institutional Work Study Program. Students are selected for this program by the heads of 
the various departments and approved by Armstrong Atlantic's human resources office. Students 
must be qualified for the available positions. 

Scholarships 

Many scholarships awarded on the basis of merit or need (or both) are available to entering 
freshmen. Award decisions are made by a scholarship committee during the spring of every year 
for the next academic year. Academic scholarship application forms are available in the financial 
aid office. The freshmen applicant deadline for submitting scholarship applications is February 1. 
The deadline for returning, transfer, and graduate students is May 1. 

Some scholarships awarded are: 

Alumni Scholarships 

Anthony Porter Scholarship 

Class of '37 Scholarship 

Dixie Crystals Scholarship 

Eleanor Webster Boyd Scholarship 

Pauline Gooch Scholarship 

Nationsbank Scholarship 

Porter Pierpont Rotary Scholarship 

Sarah Mills Hodge Scholarship 

Savannah Jaycees Scholarship 

Savannah Volunteer Guards Scholarship 

Scholarships are also awarded by various departments on campus including art, music, and 
theatre; athletics; biology; chemistry and physics; computer science; dental hygiene; history; 
mathematical sciences; and radiologic sciences. Students may contact these departments for 
application procedures. 

In addition, notices of scholarships requiring special applications or having different deadlines 
are posted on the bulletin board outside the financial aid office as they become available during 
the year. Students should come by periodically to check on any new offerings. 

HOPE — Helping Outstanding Pupils Educationally 

The state of Georgia rewards exemplary academic performance with tuition scholarships at 
state universities and colleges. 

General Qualifications for Entering Freshman. As entering freshmen, students must 
possess the following: 

• legal residency of Georgia; 

• 1993 or later graduation from an eligible Georgia high school; 



FINANCIAL INFORMATION 37 



• grade point average of at least a B (3.0 cumulative grade point average on a 4.0 scale, or 
numerical grade average of 80) in the college preparatory track. If you are in any other 
curriculum track, you must have a 3.2 cumulative grade point average on a4.0 scale, or numeric 
grade average of 85 (meeting that curriculum's requirements). 

Students may receive first-year HOPE assistance for the first 30 semester credit hours 
attempted at any Georgia public college or university. This includes tuition, HOPE-approved 
mandatory fees, and a book allowance of up to $150 per quarter. Full-time enrollment is NOT 
required. 

HOPE funds may be applied only to tuition and mandatory fees NOT covered by Pell or other 
federal grant monies received. Students may renew their scholarships for the sophomore, junior, 
and senior years. To do so, students must: 

• Maintain a 3.0 cumulative grade point average for all course work attempted (not just course 
work completed); 

• Reapply for the scholarship by completing the FAFSA or, if applicable, the HOPE Alternate 
Application; 

• Make satisfactory academic progress. 

College hours and grades attempted prior to high school graduation are not used in calculating 
the cumulative grade point average to renew the HOPE scholarship. 

Second-Chance Opportunity for Students to Regain HOPE. HOPE is a reward for 
scholastic achievement and an incentive to continue working hard in school. If, after attempting 
30 semester hours in a state college or university, students falls below a 3.0 cumulative grade point 
average, they may continue their sophomore year at their own expense. If they then earn a 3.0 
cumulative grade point average at the completion of their sophomore year (60 attempted semester 
hours), students will be given a second chance to receive a HOPE Scholarship for their junior year 
with the opportunity to renew the scholarship for their senior year (90 attempted semester hours). 

HOPE for Students Already in Public College or Returning to Public College. If a student 
graduated from high school before the HOPE program began in 1993, or is not academically 
eligible for the HOPE scholarship immediately after high school graduation, he or she may be 
eligible for the HOPE scholarship after attempting 30 or 60 semester hours of study, if he or she 
has a 3.0 cumulative grade point average and is a legal resident of Georgia. 

The PROMISE Teacher Scholarship Program provides forgivable loans to high-achieving 
students who aspire to be teachers in Georgia public schools. To be eligible, students must have 
the following: 

• legal residency in Georgia; 

• minimum cumulative grade point average of 3.6 based on a 4.0 scale; 

• academic classification as a junior; 

• acceptance in a teacher education program leading to initial certification. 

The HOPE Teacher Scholarship Program provides forgivable loans to individuals seeking 
advanced education degrees in critical shortage fields of study. To be eligible, students must have 
the following: 

• Legal residency in Georgia; 

• Regular admission to graduate school in an advanced degree teacher education program 
leading to initial certification in a critical field. (More information on the eligible fields is 
available in the financial aid office.) 

Loans 

Federal Stafford Loans. Stafford loans are available in two forms: 

• Subsidized: Need-based. The federal government pays interest as long as students maintain 
at least half-time enrollment. 

• Unsubsidized: Not need-based. Students are responsible for all interest. 
Stafford loan annual maximums based on student classifications are as follows. 

Freshmen (students who have not yet completed the first year of a program): $2,625 

Sophomores (students who have earned 45 quarter or 30 semester hours): $3,500 



38 ARMSTRONG ATLANTIC STATE UNIVERSITY 



Juniors and seniors (students who have successfully completed 

the first 90 quarter or first 60 semester hours of a four-year program): $5,500 

Note: Juniors and seniors must have declared majors and been accepted into a baccalau- 
reate degree program. 

Graduate students (students enrolled in 6 credit hours or 

more of graduate level classes): $8,500 

Additional Unsubsidized Stafford Loans. In addition to the limits listed above, independent 
students may apply for the following (not to exceed students' cost of attendance less financial aid). 

Freshmen and sophomores: $4,000 

Juniors and seniors: $5,000 

Graduate students: $10,000 

Hour Requirements: Undergraduate and graduate students must be enrolled in 6 or more 
hours to be eligible to receive a student loan. 

First Time Borrowers Who Are First Time College Students. In accordance with federal 
guidelines, the first installment of a federal Stafford Loan for a student who is entering his or her 
first year of college cannot be released until 30 days after the first day of the semester. These funds 
will not be available to buy books on registration day. Students must also complete an entrance 
counseling form. 

Electronic Funds Transfer Processing Time. Once electronic funds transfers have been sent 
to the university from the state of Georgia, there will be a processing time of five to ten business 
days, after which funds will be available at the cashier's window. 

Federal PLUS Loans. PLUS loans are available to parents of dependent, undergraduate 
students for amounts not to exceed the students' costs of education less financial aid. Applications 
are available at local lending institutions and at the financial aid office. 

Health Career and Critical Field Loans ($2,000 Maximum). Legal residents of the state of 
Georgia who are formally admitted to and enrolled in the following programs of study may be 
eligible for loans able to be canceled through service: 

Baccalaureate Degree Nursing 

Radiological Technology 

Dental Hygiene 

Medical Technology 

Special Education 

Respiratory Therapy 

Physical Therapy 

Math and Science Education 

All loans able to be canceled through service are repaid by practicing in the specified fields in 
the state of Georgia. One calendar year of service repays each academic year of the loan. 
Applications are available in the financial aid office every spring to students in eligible fields. 

Veterans Benefits 

Veteran's educational benefits may be used for study at Armstrong Atlantic. Contact the 
veterans affairs representative in the registrar's/admissions office for specific instructions on 
application procedures. 

Standards of Academic Progress 

The Higher Education Act mandates that institutions of higher education establish minimum 
standards of "satisfactory academic progress" for students receiving financial aid. To receive 
financial aid at Armstrong Atlantic State University, students must maintain satisfactory grade 
point averages and make satisfactory progress as outlined below. These requirements apply to any 
grants, loans, or scholarships containing any federal or state funds. 

Students are responsible for reading and adhering to Armstrong Atlantic's policy regarding 
standards of academic progress. Failure to meet the minimum requirements defined by this policy 



FINANCIAL INFORMATION 39 



will result in student ineligibility for assistance. Before students can receive aid from any of these 
programs for a particular year, they must meet the following requirements: 

• Academic Standing. Students who have earned 60 semester hours and do not have a 2.0 grade 
point average are not eligible for financial aid. 

• Progress Toward Degree Completion. Students must make significant progress toward 
completion of degree requirements in order to receive aid. Armstrong Atlantic State University 
requires students to successfully complete at least 67% of attempted course work for the prior 
academic year (fall-spring). For instance, if a student enrolled in 1 2 semester hours in both fall 
and spring terms he or she will be required to complete 16 hours (67% of 24=16). Grades of 
WI, WF, V, F, U, and I are not considered successful course completion. 

• Credit Hour Limit. Students at Armstrong Atlantic are given a maximum number of credit 
hours in which to complete their degrees. Students who exceed this limit are not eligible for 
aid. The credit hour limit allowed for financial aid purposes is 150% of the total number of 
hours necessary to be awarded a degree. Credit hours attempted both at Armstrong Atlantic and 
elsewhere are counted toward this limit. If a student has attempted 1 86 semester hours ( 1 50% 
of average degree requirement) without earning a degree, he or she will no longer be eligible 
to receive aid. This policy has the greatest effect on students who change their majors; 
therefore, students planning such a change should give careful consideration to the potential 
impact on their financial aid. Learning support classes will be counted toward the credit hour 
limit. 

Appeal of Aid Suspension and Reinstatement of Aid 

Students whose aid is terminated because they failed to meet the above requirements may 
appeal or reapply for aid the following academic year, if they have met the standards for classes 
taken since the termination of their aid. 

Students who feel they can demonstrate mitigating circumstances which affected their 
academic progress may make a written appeal to the standards of progress appeal committee. 
Forms for this type of appeal are available in the financial aid office. Students will be notified of 
the committee's decision approximately two weeks from the date appeals are submitted. 

If you have any questions, please call our office at 912/927-5272. Appeals may be mailed to: 
AASU Financial Aid Office, SOP Appeal Committee, 1 1935 Abercorn Street, Savannah, GA 
31419-1997. 






40 ARMSTRONG ATLANTIC STATE UNIVERSITY 

Student Services and Organizations 

As part of its educational mission, Armstrong Atlantic State University strives for the total 
development of students. This growth process is enhanced by providing opportunities for social, 
emotional, cultural, physical, and spiritual development, in addition to intellectual growth. The 
Division of Student Affairs is committed to providing programs and services in an educational 
environment which will help students to adjust to university life and achieve their full potential. 
In particular, freshmen and transfer students are encouraged to read the section on orientation 
programs under Student Services. 

The university encourages learning through involvement in the residence center, student 
government, campus organizations, intramurals, and more. 

Residence Life and Food Service 

The residence center, completed in September 1985, consists of three buildings which house 
64 students each. The apartment-style design encourages student interaction without a loss of 
privacy. Each two-bedroom suite, accommodating four students, has a bath and living room. All 
units are fully furnished, carpeted, and have unit-controlled heat and air conditioning. Phone jacks 
and an on-site coin laundry are added conveniences. Several units are equipped to accommodate 
students with disabilities. The residence complex is staffed by a head resident and resident 
assistants. These students are chosen on the basis of leadership and willingness to serve their 
fellow students. 

Students who live in university housing are required to participate in the meal plan provided 
in the Memorial College Center cafeteria. The meal plan is also available for students who do not 
choose to live in university housing. 

Housing applications and specific information may be obtained from the admissions office or 
the Division of Student Affairs. 

Student Services 

Academic Computing Center. The computing center, located in the Memorial College 
Center Annex, houses separate minicomputer and microcomputer facilities for student use. All 
machines in the academic computing center are connected to the campus-wide network and allow 
access to file servers and other network services. A separate engineering microcomputer lab has 
high performance color workstations and a high-speed plotter. 

Academic Orientation and Advisement. Faculty advisors in the academic orientation and 
advisement office represent a variety of disciplines and are available for student consultations. 
They provide advisement regarding core curricula, transfer course work, transient studies, majors, 
and career choices. Students may also access a variety of resources in print, via the World Wide 
Web, and by using a computer-based library of educational and occupational topics. The office 
of academic orientation and advisement also administers the post-secondary options program for 
accelerated high school students, and the AASU 1101 Strategies for Success course. Open most 
evenings until 7:30, the office is located on the first floor of Victor Hall. 

Adult Academic Services. This office provides information and guidance to mature students 
who are beginning university studies for the first time or who are returning after years away. 
Adults Back to College information sessions are offered every semester, and information packets 
are available by mail. Students seeking academic renewal information and advice are also served. 
The office, located in Gamble Hall, is open most evenings until 7:00. 

Alcohol and Drug Education. The office of alcohol and drug education provides campus 
alcohol and drug prevention programs, as well as services to students with individual concerns 
about alcohol/drug-related issues including personal assessments, counseling, and/or referral to 
community treatment programs. Assistance is also offered for other personal issues. The Division 
of Student Affairs coordinates support group meetings on campus and collaborates with local 
prevention and treatment facilities. Training is provided for residence hall advisors and CHAOS 
leaders. Classroom instruction is provided upon request of instructors. Resource materials are 
available. 



STUDENT LIFE 41 



Bookstore. Armstrong Atlantic's bookstore, located between the Memorial College Center 
(MCC) and the MCC Annex, provides students with textbooks, school supplies, university 
apparel, gifts, and laboratory and studio supplies. Extended hours are posted during the first week 
of every semester. 

Cafeteria. The campus cafeteria is located in MCC and offers cash service as well as meal 
plans. A daily hot line, salad bar, deli line, pizza, and Chick-Fil-A are open during the academic 
year. 

Career Services. This office provides assistance with all aspects of career development and 
the job search process. Students in the early stages of career development can obtain assistance 
in such areas as selecting a major, gathering occupational information, investigating career paths 
through individualized career counseling and computerized career guidance techniques. Part-time 
and full-time employment opportunities, along with cooperative education opportunities, are 
listed in the office of career service's career library. Students closer to graduation may take 
advantage of one-on-one assistance or workshops on topics such as resume writing, interviewing 
skills, business and social etiquette, dressing for success, and applying to graduate school. Mock 
interviews are also available to help prepare students and alumni for the job search process. Local, 
regional, and national job listings, referrals, and on-campus interviewing services are available to 
students and alumni registered with career services. Two job fairs are held annually. The job fair 
for liberal arts and health professions graduates is held every fall and education career day is held 
during spring term for education students and graduates. All juniors and seniors are urged to 
register with the career services office three terms before graduating to establish a placement file 
and become eligible for services. 

Counseling Services. Services are offered to currently enrolled and former students at no cost. 
Whether setting goals or resolving personal issues, students can be assured that discussions held 
with professional counselors are strictly confidential. Students may schedule individual appoint- 
ments or sign up for group workshops in the Division of Student Affairs on the second floor of the 
Memorial College Center. 

Disability Services. Students with disabilities are provided accommodations appropriate to 
their documented needs. These services are determined on an individual basis. Accommodations 
may include extended time on exams, alternate test formats, reader services, sign language 
interpreters, assistive listening devices, note-takers, assistance with registration, or other services 
as needed. If a student has a disability which may require accommodation, he or she should contact 
the office of disability services in the Division of Student Affairs as soon as possible. Copies of 
disability services policies and procedures and the ADA grievance procedure are also available 
in the student affairs office. 

ID Cards. New Armstrong Atlantic ID cards are made in room 214 on the second floor of 
Memorial College Center. Old IDs must be validated every semester. 

International Student Services. Students from other countries are encouraged to contact the 
international student services office for information and materials that will assist with the 
transition to American higher education. Students from this country interested in opportunities to 
study abroad may also contact that office. 

Lane Library. Built in 1966 and substantially enlarged in 1975, Lane Library supports the 
academic programs of Armstrong Atlantic State University. To that end, library faculty provide 
assistance in identifying, locating, obtaining, and using information resources. A valid Armstrong 
Atlantic ID card is required to check out materials. 

The library collections consist of 800,000 items: 1 85,000 book volumes; 600,000 microforms; 
and 9.000 individual audiovisual titles including compact discs, records, laser discs, slides, and 
video recordings. In addition, the library subscribes to approximately 1.043 journals and 
newspapers. A special collection, the Florence Powell Minis Collection, contains publications of 
the university, published works by Savannah authors, and published material about Savannah and 
the surrounding area. The collection also includes first editions by Conrad Aiken, Flanner\ 
O'Connor, and other Savannah authors. Through participation in state, regional, and national 
resource-sharing agreements with other libraries. Lane Library is able to borrow and obtain for 
its clientele materials not available at Armstrong Atlantic. Interlibrary loan (ILL) materials arrive 
by UPS, fax and electronic delivery services. 



42 ARMSTRONG ATLANTIC STATE UNIVERSITY 



Off-campus library services for Armstrong Atlantic programs are supported by local libraries. 
Library directors coordinate the purchase of books, journal subscriptions and electronic media. 
Off-campus students may access library resources at home by accessing the online catalog, 
ORCA. Interlibrary loans may also be requested through ORCA. In addition, over 100 databases 
are available on GALILEO, a system of databases shared among the 34 University System of 
Georgia libraries. GALILEO may be accessed by registered Armstrong Atlantic students from 
home via password. 

Math Tutorial Center. Tutorial services are provided on a first-come, first-served basis to a 
large number of students enrolled in learning support math or college algebra courses. The center 
is staffed 6-8 hours a day by student tutors and by faculty volunteers from the Department of 
Learning Support. The lab is administered jointly by the Department of Learning Support and the 
Department of Mathematics, and is located on the second floor of Lane Library. 

Minority Advisement. The minority advisement program helps minority students develop 
interest in all facets of campus life. Peer advisors offers one-on-one assistance to students in 
adjusting to personal and academic life on campus. Social, cultural, and educational activities 
designed to broaden all students' knowledge of African- American people and their contributions 
to society are presented. 

Parking. All vehicles driven on campus must display a university parking decal on the rear 
window. Free decals are available at the public safety office on Science Drive. All students, 
faculty, and staff are encouraged to become aware of Armstrong Atlantic's parking regulations. 
A copy of the regulations may be picked up in the public safety or students affairs offices, and 
regulations are published in Students Illustrated. 

Reading Lab. This resource is available to students who feel the need for assistance in college 
level reading. Staffed by student tutors and by faculty volunteers from the Department of Learning 
Support, the lab is open 6-8 hours a day and, in addition to one-on-one assistance, offers audiotapes 
and computer programs that foster the development of reading skills. The lab is administered by 
the Department of Learning Support and is located on the second floor of Lane Library. 

Testing. Tests for career interests, study habits, learning styles, personal preferences, and 
abilities are provided free of charge with counseling services. In addition, the following state- and 
nation-wide testing programs are administered by the director of counseling services: Academic 
Profile, ACT PEP Regents College Degrees, College-Level Examination Program, DANTES 
Subject Standardized Tests, Graduate Record Examinations, Major Field Achievement Tests, 
Medical College Admission Test, Miller Analogies Test, Pharmacy College Admission Test, the 
Praxis Series, and the Regents' Testing Program. For information about these and other testing 
programs, please contact the Division of Student Affairs. 

Veterans. The veterans affairs representative is helpful in advising about certification 
procedures and services available to veterans. 

Volunteer and Service Learning. This office, located on the second floor of Memorial 
College Center, provides opportunities for experiential education through internships, coopera- 
tive education, and volunteer community service. Students may receive academic credit or 
financial incentives in addition to major or career-related experience. 

Writing Center. Students in all disciplines may come to the writing center in Gamble Hall for 
help with their writing. Tutors in the writing center offer individual instruction in basic writing 
skills and provide guidance in the preparation of essays, reports, and research papers. Writing 
center staff members not only assist students in core composition courses, but are also available 
to work with faculty to improve writing across the curriculum. The center is administered by the 
Department of Languages, Literature, and Philosophy. 

Student Activities and Organizations 

Academic Honor Societies. Honor societies recognize and encourage superior scholarship in 
many fields of study. Campus chapters include: Alpha Sigma Chi (Physical Education); Beta Beta 
Beta (Biology); Kappa Delta Pi; Pi Gamma Mu (Social Science); Sigma Delta Tau (English); 
Sigma Theta Tau; Honors Student Organization. 

Cultural Opportunities. Nationally known speakers, contemporary concerts, dances, popu- 
lar films, exhibits, and performances by outstanding classical and modern artists from around the 



STUDENT LIFE 43 



world complement students' general education. These programs are selected and coordinated by 
the campus union board. Student dramatic, choral, and instrumental groups, under professional 
direction, have established distinguished traditions. On-campus offerings, such as the faculty 
lecture series, broaden knowledge and interest in a non-classroom setting. The thousand-seat Fine 
Arts Auditorium often hosts performances by the Savannah Symphony, area arts groups, and out- 
of-town troupes such as the National Shakespeare Company. 

Intercollegiate Athletics. Armstrong Atlantic is affiliated with the National Collegiate 
Athletic Association (NCAA) Division II. Athletic scholarships are available to support student- 
athletes who participate in the intercollegiate program. The men's athletic teams consist of 
basketball, baseball, tennis, and cross country. Women's teams include tennis, cross country, 
volleyball, basketball, and softball. Cheerleaders are also sponsored. Armstrong Atlantic State 
University is affiliated with the Peach Belt Athletic Conference (Armstrong Atlantic State 
University, Augusta State University, Columbus State University, Francis Marion University, 
Georgia College and State University, Kennesaw State University, Lander University, UNC 
Pembroke, USC Aiken, USC Spartanburg, North Florida University, and Clayton College and 
State University). 

Intramurals and Recreation. The university places a high priority on its intramural and 
recreational offerings and provides a wide variety of activities including organized competitive 
sports. The sports and aquatic recreation centers include an indoor pool, gymnasium, fitness 
center, sauna, and indoor track. Outdoor facilities for tennis and field sports are adjacent to the 
athletic buildings. 

Orientation Programs. Designed to promote the academic and social adjustment of new and 
transfer students, CHAOS (Communication, Help, Advisement, Orientation, and Service) orien- 
tation sessions provide new students with the information, services and support essential to a 
successful transition into the Armstrong Atlantic community. Participants in the one-day CHAOS 
sessions receive individual attention from student leaders and staff as they acquire first hand 
experience with academic advising, registration, campus facilities, student activities, and univer- 
sity policies and procedures. The CHAOS program is a cooperative effort of student leaders and 
university staff. Competitive selection of student leaders occurs annually during spring semester. 
Inquiries concerning CHAOS should be addressed to the Division of Student Affairs. An 
abbreviated orientation program is scheduled for new students prior to registration for spring and 
summer semesters. The university also encourages new students to enroll in AASU 1101 - 
University Studies. In addition to the course content, those enrolled will receive special advising 
and other services. See listing for AASU 1101 in Course Descriptions. 

Student Clubs and Organizations. Armstrong Atlantic State University students have 
numerous opportunities to develop leadership skills, broaden their social and professional 
backgrounds, and make significant contributions to the university and the community. Clubs and 
organizations reflect the natural variety of interests found in a diverse student body: 

• Religious: Baptist Student Union, New Generation Campus Ministries, Wesley Fellowship, 
Newman Club. 

• Greek: Delta Sigma Theta, Kappa Alpha Psi, Kappa Gamma Pi, Sigma Kappa Chi. 

• Professional: Armstrong Biological Society; American Chemical Society; AASU Anthropol- 
ogy Club; AASU Engineering Society; Georgia Association of Nursing Students: James 
Moore Wayne Law Club; Junior American Dental Hygienists Association; Medical Technol- 
ogy Club; Student Georgia Association of Educators; The E. B. Twitmeyer Society (Psychology); 
Armstrong Economic Club; Association for Computing Machinery & Data Processing 
Management Association; Music Educators National Conference; Radiologic Technologies 
Association; National Art Education Association; Physical Therapy Club: Criminal Justice 
Club; Joel E. Hildebrand Chemistry Society; The Philosophical Debate; Political Science 
Club; Respiratory Therapy Club; National Student Speech, Language and Hearing Associa- 
tion. 

• Special Interest: Band, Cercle Francais, Cheerleaders, Chorus, College Republicans, Ebony 
Coalition, FCA Huddle, Gospel Choir, Hispanic Society, International Club, Masquers. Unit) 



44 ARMSTRONG ATLANTIC STATE UNIVERSITY 



and Diversity League, Vocal Ensemble, Women of Worth (WOW), and AISEC (International 

Association of Students Interested in Economics and Business Management). 

Inquiries concerning any campus club or organization should be addressed to the office of 
student activities. 

Student Government Association. The official governing body of students at Armstrong 
Atlantic State University, student government assists in formulating a program of student services 
and activities, strives to express the will of the majority of students, and provides experience in 
democratic living. All students are automatically members of the SGA and entitled to vote in SGA 
elections. Qualified students may seek SGA leadership positions by running for office during the 
spring elections. 

Student Publications. Students develop skills in creative writing, editing, reporting, photog- 
raphy, and design by involvement with the Inkwell (newspaper) and Calliope (literary magazine), 
both produced by students under the supervision of approved university advisors. Student 
photographic services provides employment and recognition for student photographers. All are 
financed primarily by the student activity fund. 



ACADEMIC POLICIES AND PROGRAMS 45 

Academic Policies and Programs 

Academic Advisement 

Armstrong Atlantic State University considers academic advisement to be an essential 
component of the educational experience. Academic advisors assist students in several areas of 
their university experience including choosing a major, exploring career options, and selecting 
courses every semester. While students are ultimately responsible for their own choices, selection 
of their academic program, and for meeting university deadlines, Armstrong Atlantic does require 
each student to meet with an advisor at least once every semester. The vice president and dean of 
faculty gives overall direction to the advisement program, with appropriate department heads 
coordinating advisement in their departments. Academic advisement is available as follows: 

Office of Academic Orientation and Advisement - 113 Victor Hall. 

• All undeclared majors 

• Students with CPC deficiencies in science, social science, or foreign language 
Department of Learning Support - Jenkins Hall. 

• All students currently enrolled in learning support courses 

• Students with CPC deficiencies in math and/or English 
Office of Adult Academic Services - 104 Gamble Hall. 

• All students in the 62 Plus program 

• Non-degree-seeking students returning to school after a number of years away 
Departmental Offices. All students who have declared majors or are enrolled in pre- 

professional programs should obtain advisement in their departments. 

Academic Renewal for Returning Students 

Students who return to college after an absence of six years or longer may be eligible for 
academic renewal, a policy whereby academic credit for previously completed course work is 
retained only for courses in which a grade of A, B, C, or S has been earned. Retained grades are 
not calculated in the academic renewal grade point average; however, for the purpose of 
designating graduation honors, all course work is considered. Students interested in the academic 
renewal program may contact the office of adult academic services at 912/961-3163. 

Academic Standing 

The university recognizes four categories of academic standing: good standing, good 
standing with warning, academic probation, and academic suspension. Students are expected 
to maintain or exceed the grade point average as indicated in the chart below. 

Semester Hours Attempted Required Overall 

At Armstrong and Elsewhere Grade Point Average (GPA) 

0-20 1.5 

21-40 1.7 

41-60 1.9 

over 60 2.0 

Students who fall below the overall GPA for the first time are placed on good standing with 
warning. Failure to raise the overall GPA to the required level during the next semester will result 
in academic probation. Students on academic probation are not in good standing. If students' 
overall GPAs are raised to the required level, students are returned to good standing. The second 
or any subsequent failure to meet the required GPA will result in academic suspension. 

Students on academic probation who fail to achieve the required overall GPA, but who do earn 
an average of at least 2.0 during the probationary semester, will continue to be on academic 
probation for the next semester of attendance. Students on academic probation who neither 
achieve the required overall GPA nor earn at least a 2.0 average during the probationary semester 
will be placed on academic suspension from the university for one semester. A student on 



46 ARMSTRONG ATLANTIC STATE UNIVERSITY 



academic suspension for the first time has the option of attending summer school without having 
to appeal the suspension. However, a student who fails to make satisfactory progress as a result 
of summer school will be placed on second suspension and have to appeal for readmission in the 
fall semester. Other than this one exception — attending summer school without having to appeal 
the suspension — students must submit a written appeal in order to be considered for readmission. 

A student suspended for academic reasons for the first or second time may appeal by letter to 
the committee on academic standing to be considered for readmission. The letter should state the 
nature of any extenuating circumstances relating to the academic deficiency and must be delivered 
to the office of the dean of academic and enrollment services no later than 9 a.m. of registration 
day. The committee on academic standing will make a recommendation to the president, and the 
decision of the president is final. 

Students re-entering the university after academic suspension are placed on academic proba- 
tion and must meet the requirements listed above. A third academic suspension is final, with the 
exception that after one year' s absence, a student may be considered for readmission. If the student 
is permitted to re-enroll and fails to achieve the required GPA, he or she will be excluded 
permanently from the university. 

Armstrong Atlantic Students Transient Elsewhere 

Armstrong Atlantic students who wish to take course work at another college or university with 
the intent of applying the courses to their academic record at Armstrong Atlantic may do so in 
accordance with regulations for transient status to another college. Students must meet any 
requirements stipulated by the other college, and, in order to apply the credits toward their 
academic records at Armstrong Atlantic, must meet the academic regulations of Armstrong 
Atlantic. Consult with the registrar's office for details. 

Attendance 

Control of student attendance at class meetings and the effect of attendance on course grades 
are left to the discretion of instructors. Students are responsible for knowing everything that is 
announced, discussed, or lectured upon in class as well as for mastering all assigned reading. 
Students are also responsible for submitting on time all assignments, tests, recitations, and 
unannounced quizzes. 

Instructors are responsible for informing all classes at the first meeting what constitutes 
excessive absence in the course. Students are responsible for knowing and complying with 
attendance regulations in all their courses. Instructors may drop students from any course with a 
grade of W or WF, if in their judgment absences have been excessive. 

Auditing Courses 

Students should request to audit courses during the registration process. Students may not 
change from audit to credit status or from credit to audit status after completing the registration 
process. In place of a grade, the letter V is recorded on the student's transcript for any audited 
course. Students auditing a course or courses pay the regular schedule of fees. No student may 
audit a course in the department of learning support. 

Course and Study Load 

The normal course load for full-time students is 1 2- 1 5 semester hours, plus a course in physical 
education during the freshman and sophomore years. Full-time students are those registered for 
12 or more hours. Part-time students are registered for fewer than 12 semester hours. Students 
should plan to spend about six hours in out-of-class preparation per week for each 3 semester hour 
course. It is recommended that students enrolled in required learning support courses limit their 
course loads to 12 semester hours. 



ACADEMIC POLICIES AND PROGRAMS 47 



Classification of Students 

Students are invited to participate in web and voice registration based on their academic 
classification, according to the chart below. 



Hours Earned 


Classification 


1-29 


Freshman 


30-59 


Sophomore 


60-89 


Junior 


90 or more 


Senior 



Dropping Courses 

Students wishing to drop a course after the semester has begun must obtain a drop-add notice 
in the registrar's office. The notice must be signed by the instructor of the course being dropped 
and returned by the student to the registrar's office. 

A student who drops a course within the first seven days will receive a grade of W for the 
course. A student who drops a course after the first seven class days and on or before the semester 
dates listed for mid-term will receive a W or WF at the instructor' s discretion. A student who drops 
a learning support course after the first seven class days will receive a WF. A student may not drop 
a course without penalty following the semester dates listed for mid-term. A student is not allowed 
to drop RGTR 1 99 or ENGL 1101, 1 1 02, or 2 1 00 at any time unless extenuating circumstances 
prevail, and the drop form must be authorized by the dean of the College of Arts and Sciences or 
a designated representative. 

Students enrolled in both required learning support and credit courses may not withdraw from 
learning support courses unless they also withdraw from college courses carrying three or more 
credits. Students may, however, remain enrolled in other learning support courses and, if so 
enrolled, may also remain in college-level courses carrying fewer than three semester credit hours. 
After the twelfth week of the semester, students will be allowed to remain in college-level courses 
if withdrawn from required learning support courses. 

English and Mathematics Placement 

During the initial terms of enrollment at Armstrong Atlantic State University, students must 
enroll in the appropriate sequence of English composition courses until the sequence has been 
completed and/or the Regents' Test has been passed. Students must not delay this sequence 
beyond their second semester of attendance. For assistance in identifying the appropriate English 
composition courses, students should consult advisors in the departments of their declared majors, 
the admissions office, or the Department of Languages, Literature, and Philosophy. See the 
Department of Languages, Literature, and Philosophy for further information (or check the 
department's listing in the catalog). 

Placement in mathematics courses is determined by scores on the SAT or college placement 
exams, and other factors. See the MATH 1111 course description in this catalog. 

The university reserves the right to place students in appropriate English and mathematics 
courses in the core curriculum. Diagnostic tests may be administered for this purpose. 

Grade Appeals 

In accordance with Armstrong Atlantic State University regulations, appeals for a change of 
grade may be initiated through the head of the appropriate academic department prior to midterm 
of the semester after the grade was received. Without the approval of the academic standing 
committee, no change of grade, other than incomplete, may be made later than two calendar 
semesters following the semester in which the grade was received. 

A student who contests a grade will have the following line of appeal: 

1. The student will discuss the contested grade with the instructor involved 

2. If the grade dispute remains unresolved, the student will meet with the department head and 
the instructor. If the grade dispute is with the department head, the student will meet with the 



48 ARMSTRONG ATLANTIC STATE UNIVERSITY 



dean of the college and the department head. A memorandum for the record will be prepared 
by the department head (or dean) which will include the substance of the conversations during 
the meeting. The student will receive a copy of the memorandum upon request. 

3. If the grade dispute remains unresolved, the student will present his or her appeal in writing 
to the department head or the dean of the college, as applicable, who will then appoint a review 
board to hear the appeal. It is expected that the student will initiate this step no later than 
midterm of the semester after the grade was received, except if the student plans enrollment 
in a course for which the course grade being appealed is a prerequisite — see (4) below. 

a. The review board will consist of the department head or the dean of the college, as 
applicable, and two members of the department, not including the instructor involved. A 
separate hearing officer shall be appointed by the college dean. In small departments, 
membership may come from outside the department. 

b. The review board shall hear statements from both the student and the instructor involved 
and will examine documents that are pertinent to the matter under review. 

c. The review board will hear the grade appeal and present its findings to the college dean prior 
to the last week of the semester. 

4. If the student plans enrollment in a course for which the course grade being appealed is a 
prerequisite, then the following timetable will be met at the beginning of that semester: 

a. If a grade appeal is not resolved with the instructor concerned, the student will file an appeal 
in writing with the department head (or the dean of the college if the grade dispute is with 
the department head). This step will be taken by the second day of the semester. 

b. The review board to hear the appeal will be appointed by the third day of the semester. If 
department members are not available to form a review board, the dean of the college, in 
consultation with the department head, will appoint a review board. 

c. A review board will hear and complete the grade appeal by the fifth day of the semester and 
present its findings to the college dean through the hearing officer (or the vice president if 
the dean is a member of the committee). 

d. If the appeal to the college dean is denied, the student will be dropped from the course for 
which the appealed course grade was prerequisite. 

5. If the college dean denies the appeal, the student may continue the appeal to the vice president 
and dean of faculty. This appeal must be in writing and must be filed within five days of 
notification from the college dean. 

6. Neither the president nor the regents will accept or consider appeals based on academic grades. 

Grading System and Grade Point Average Calculation 

Grade Quality Points per Semester Hour 

A (Excellent) 4.0 

B (Good) 3.0 

C (Satisfactory) 2.0 

D (Passing) 1.0 

F (Failure) 0.0 

W (Withdrew, no penalty) 0.0 

WF (Withdrew, failing) 0.0 

I (Incomplete) 0.0 

IP (In Progress) 0.0 

S (Satisfactory) 0.0 

U (Unsatisfactory) 0.0 

V (Audit, no credit) 0.0 

K (Credit by Examination) 0.0 

NR (Grade Not Reported) 0.0 



ACADEMIC POLICIES AND PROGRAMS 49 

Grade Symbols. 

# Optional provision (forgiveness policy). Course grade not counted in computation of 
grade point average. Hours earned for grades of A, B, C and S. 

% Learning support grade symbol. Course grade not counted in computation of grade point 
average or hours earned. 

* College preparatory curriculum. Course grade counted in computation of grade point 
average, but not in earned hours. 

Course Repeat Symbols. 

E Course repeated. Course grade excluded from grade point average and hours earned. 

I Course repeated. Course grade included in grade point average and hours earned. (See 

also Incomplete Grade below.) 

The letters S and U may be used for completion of degree requirements other than academic 

course work (such as student teaching, clinical practice, etc.). WF (Withdrew, Failing) is recorded 

for any student withdrawing after the mid-term date. Grades received in learning support courses 

are not computed in the grade point average. Exceptions to this policy must be approved by the 

dean of the college in which the course is taught and will be approved only on the basis of hardship. 

Incomplete Grade 

An incomplete grade which has not been removed by the midterm of the following semester 
is changed to a grade of F unless the instructor recommends an extension in writing, addressed to 
the appropriate dean. 

Grade Point Average Calculation 

Three academic grade point averages (GPAs) are displayed on students' transcripts. 

Institutional GPA. Determined by dividing the total honor points earned by the total hours 
attempted on all course work taken at Armstrong Atlantic only. 

Transfer GPA. Determined by dividing the total honor points earned by the total hours 
attempted on all transfer course work taken at other institutions. 

Overall GPA. Determined by dividing the total honor points earned by the total hours 
attempted on all course work taken at Armstrong Atlantic and elsewhere. 

Honors 

Dean's List. Students enrolled for at least nine semester hours of course work who earn a grade 
point average of at least 3.6 will be placed on the dean's list. Only course work taken at Armstrong 
Atlantic will be used in the computation of dean's list honors. 

Cum Laude. Students graduating with a grade point average of 3.2 through 3.499 will graduate 
cum laude. 

Magna Cum Laude. Students graduating with a grade point average of 3.5 through 3.799 will 
graduate magna cum laude. 

Summa Cum Laude. Students graduating with a grade point average of 3.8 through 4.0 will 
graduate summa cum laude. 

All work attempted at Armstrong Atlantic and other accredited institutions will be considered 
in computing graduation honors. Academic honors will not be awarded to second degree 
recipients unless students specifically request an "award evaluation." All course work is 
considered for honors, even for students granted academic renewal. 



50 ARMSTRONG ATLANTIC STATE UNIVERSITY 



Overloads and Courses at Other Colleges 

Permission to enroll for more than 17 semester hours will be granted by the registrar if a 
student: 

• Has earned an average grade of B for full-time enrollment in the preceding semester; or 

• Has earned an overall grade point average of 3.0; or 

• Requires an extra course in the one or two semesters prior to graduation. 

No student will be allowed to register for more than 21 semester hours. A student who is on 
academic probation will not be permitted to register for more than 17 semester hours. Exceptions 
to these limitations may be made only by the appropriate dean. 

Students enrolled at Armstrong Atlantic who at the same time take courses for credit at other 
colleges or universities may not transfer such credit to Armstrong Atlantic, unless written 
permission from the appropriate dean has been obtained. 



Withdrawing from the University 



Withdrawing from the university means that a student drops all courses for the current 
enrollment period. Any student who finds it necessary to withdraw should begin the withdrawal 
process in the Division of Student Affairs. Formal withdrawal from the university is required to 
ensure that the student is eligible to return to Armstrong Atlantic at a future date. Any refund to 
which a student is entitled will be considered on the basis of the date which appears on the formal 
withdrawal form. Grading procedures for withdrawing are the same as those listed for dropping 
a course. 

Withdrawal - Involuntary 

A student may be administratively withdrawn from the university when in the judgment of the 
vice president for student affairs and the university physician, if any, and after consultation with 
the student's parents and personal physician, if any, it is determined that the student suffers from 
a physical, mental, emotional or psychological health condition which (a) poses a significant 
danger or threat of physical harm to the student or to the person or property of others; or (b) causes 
the student to interfere with the rights of other members of the University community, or with the 
exercise of any proper activities or functions of the university or its personnel, or causes the 
student to be unable to meet institutional requirements for admission and continued enrollment, 
as defined in the student conduct code and other publications of the university. 

Except in emergency situations, a student shall, upon request, be accorded an appropriate 
hearing before a final decision concerning his or her continued enrollment in the university. 

Honor Code 

The honor code at Armstrong Atlantic State University is dedicated to the proposition that the 
protection of the grading system is in the interest of the student community. The student court is 
an institutional means to assure that the student community shall have primary disposition of 
infractions of the honor code and that students accused of such infractions shall enjoy those 
procedural guarantees traditionally considered essential to fair and impartial hearing, the foremost 
of which is the presumption of innocence until guilt is established beyond a reasonable doubt. 

I. Responsibilities of Students 

All students must agree to abide by the rules of the honor code. A student shall not be accepted 
at Armstrong Atlantic State University unless he or she signs a statement affirming his understand- 
ing of this agreement. The honor code shall be printed in the official bulletin and Students 
Illustrated. 



ACADEMIC POLICIES AND PROGRAMS 51 



It will be the responsibility of the student court or its designated representative to conduct an 
orientation program at the beginning of each semester for all new students to explain fully the 
honor code and to allow full discussion of its requirements. 

Any student desiring assistance with any matter related to the honor code is invited to seek 
assistance in the Division of Student Affairs. 

II. Violations of the Honor Code 

Violations of the honor code may be of two kinds: (a) general and (b) those related to the 
peculiarities of specific course-related problems and to the understanding of individual instruc- 
tors. Any instructor whose conception of cheating would tend to enlarge or contract the general 
regulations defining cheating must explicitly notify the affected students of the qualifications to 
the general regulations which he or she wishes to stipulate. The following will be considered 
general violations of the honor code. 

1. Giving or receiving any unauthorized help on any assignment, test or paper. The meaning of 
unauthorized help shall be made clear by the instructor of each class. 

2. Stealing when related to cheating. 

3. Plagiarizing. Plagiarism is the unacknowledged use of another's words or ideas. Students must 
be familiar with the explanation of plagiarism given in the writing handbook used in freshman 
composition classes. Ignorance of what constitutes plagiarism will not be accepted as an 
excuse for plagiarism. 

4. Giving perjured testimony before the student court. 

5. Suborning, attempting to suborn, or intimidating witnesses. 

6. Failing to report a suspected violation of the honor code. 

III. Reporting Violations of the Honor Code 

Anyone wishing to report a violation may come to the Division of Student Affairs for 
assistance in contacting members of the student court. 

A. Self-reporting: Students who have broken the honor code should report themselves to a 
member of the student court. 

B. Anyone (faculty member or student) who is aware of a violation of the honor code must report 
the matter. 

1 . Tell persons thought to be guilty to report themselves to a member of the student court no 
later than the end of the next school day. After this designated time, the person who is aware 
of the violation must inform a member of the student court so that the student court may 
contact the accused persons if they have not already reported themselves. 

2. Report the suspected violation directly to a member of the student court without informing 
the accused. 

IV. The Procedural Rights of the Students Accused of Violations of the Honor Code 

The essence of the procedural rights of the accused is the right to be presumed innocent until 
proven guilty. Specific rights are as follows: 

1 . The accused will be notified in writing by the student court or its designated representative of 
the nature and details of the offense with which they are charged, along with the names of their 
accusers and the principal witnesses to be brought against them. This notification shall occur 
no less than three days prior to the date of the hearing. 

2. The accused has the right to counsel of their own choosing. Such counsel will not participate 
directly in the proceedings except to advise the client. It is expected that such counsel w ill be 
drawn from the university community. 

3. The accused and the person bringing the charges shall be afforded an opportunity to present 
witnesses and documentary or other evidence. The accused and any individual bringing the 



52 ARMSTRONG ATLANTIC STATE UNIVERSITY 



charges shall have the right to cross examine all witnesses and may, where the witnesses cannot 
appear because of illness or other cause acceptable to the court, present the sworn statement 
of the witnesses. The court shall not be bound by formal rules governing the presentation of 
evidence, and it may consider any evidence presented which is of probative value in the case. 

4. The accused may not be made to bear witness against themselves. The court may not take the 
refusal of the accused to testify as evidence of guilt, but this proviso does not give the accused 
immunity from a hearing or from recommendations reached in a hearing simply because the 
accused does not testify. 

5. The accused shall have access to a complete audiotape of the hearing and to the record prepared 
by the secretary. 

6. The substantive facts of a case may be re-opened for consideration upon initiation of the 
accused acting through normal appeal channels. The accused shall not be put in double 
jeopardy. 

7. All witnesses will be sequestered from the hearing room during the course of a hearing. 
Witnesses may not discuss a pending case. 

8. By prior agreement, the accused will be allowed such observers of the hearing as may be 
commensurate with the space available. Otherwise, in the interests of the right of privacy of 
the accused, hearings will be private, except that the university may also have observers 
additional to the advisors to the student court. 

V. The Student Conduct Committee, the Student Court and Advisors to the Student 
Court 

A. Student Conduct Committee 

1. The student conduct committee shall be responsible to the faculty for recommending 
policies relating to the academic honor code and the code of conduct, for formulating or 
approving rules, enforcement procedures, and sanctions within the framework of existing 
policies, and for recommending changes in the administration of any aspects of the honor 
code and the student code of conduct. The conduct committee will also interview and select 
members for the student court. 

2. The committee shall consist of five teaching faculty members, the vice president for student 
affairs and four students. The four students will be the president and vice president of the 
student court, the president of the student government association, and one student-at- 
large. The faculty members shall be appointed by the faculty in accordance with the faculty 
statutes. 

3. The vice president of student affairs shall assist the conduct committee in the development 
of policy and in the discharge of its responsibilities. He or she shall coordinate the activities 
of all officials, committees, student groups, and tribunals for student conduct. 

4. All regulations or rules relating to student conduct that are proposed by any university 
official, committee or student group, and for which sanctions may be imposed in the name 
of the university, must be submitted to the committee for consideration and review prior to 
submission to the faculty and the student body. The committee shall have 10 days in which 
to review the same. 

B. Student Court 

1 . The student court will be selected by the student conduct committee and will be composed 
of twelve students. Due consideration will be given to equitable apportionment of court 
members on the basis of academic class, race, and sex. Students on academic probation may 
not serve. All appointments will be issued and accepted in writing. Appointments will be 
made during spring semester in time for newly elected members of the court to assume their 
duties by May 1 . Appointments will be made as needed to keep the student court staffed to 
do business on a reasonably prompt basis. These appointments may constitute permanent 
or temporary replacements as the student conduct committee deems necessary. 



ACADEMIC POLICIES AND PROGRAMS 53 



2. The student court will elect a president, vice president, and a secretary from its membership. 
The president will preside at all meetings. The vice president will assume the duties of the 
president if the president is absent. The secretary will maintain written notes of all 
proceedings and audiotape records of all testimony, and will maintain exhibits of evidence 
which by their nature may reasonably be maintained in the court files. A quorum of the court 
shall consist of seven members. A two-thirds majority secret ballot vote is required to reach 
a finding of guilty. All other questions may be decided by a simple majority vote. 

3. Constituency of the student court during the summer semester shall include all appointed 
members in attendance, and others shall be appointed to membership by the student conduct 
committee. 

4. Student court members shall examine their consciences carefully to determine whether 
they can in good conscience serve on a panel hearing a particular case, and in the event that 
there is any doubt whatsoever, such members shall excuse themselves from duty on the 
specific panel in question. 

C. Advisors to the Court 

1 . An advisor and an associate advisor to the student court shall be appointed by the president 
of the university. 

2. Ordinarily the advisor will serve in that office for one year only and usually will be 
succeeded in that position by the associate advisor. Therefore, after the initial appoint- 
ments, only an associate advisor will ordinarily be appointed each year. The succession of 
an associate to the advisor position is deemed to occur on the last day of spring semester. 
If, for any reason, the advisor is unable to complete his or her term, the associate advisor 
shall succeed to the office of advisor and another associate advisor shall be appointed by 
the above procedures. If, during the summer semester, neither advisor is on campus, a 
temporary advisor will be appointed. 

3. Duties of the advisor and the associate advisor: It shall be the duty of the advisor to consult 
with the court and to offer advice to the president and members of the court on substantive 
and procedural questions. The advisor, or the associate advisor in the event the advisor is 
unable to attend, shall be present at all meetings and hearings of the court. The advisor may 
not vote or participate directly in the conduct of hearings before the court except through 
the chair, or acting chair, of the court. The advisor should be governed at all times by the 
principle that a hearing before the student court is primarily a matter of student responsi- 
bility. 

VI. Procedures and Penalties Adopted by the Student Court 

The student court shall formulate its own bylaws governing internal organization and 
procedure. Such bylaws must be consistent with the honor code. 

A. Hearings shall be called by the court president to be held on a date not less than three nor more 
than ten class days after notice to the accused as provided in Section IV-2. Exceptions to these 
time requirements may be granted. 

B. Upon reaching a finding of guilty, the court shall make a recommendation to the vice president 
of the university as to the administrative action it deems appropriate within the following 
limitations: 

1 . A minimum penalty shall be loss of assignment or test credit for the assignment or test for 
violations involving cheating as specified in Section II, subsections 1,2, and 3. Additional 
penalties such as reprimands, suspension, or others may be recommended for any aspects 
of Section II. 

2. Maximum penalty for a first offense of any type shall be suspension for a full calendar year. 

3. Maximum penalty for a second offense may be suspension for three years. 



54 ARMSTRONG ATLANTIC STATE UNIVERSITY 



C. Immediately following a hearing, the accused will be informed of the court's finding and its 
recommendation to the vice president and dean of faculty. If the finding is guilty, the accused 
will be informed that the court may reopen the case with the consent of the accused for good 
cause, within a three week period. 

D. The vice president and dean of faculty will inform all involved persons in writing of the action 
taken in view of the court recommendation. The court secretary will post public notice of the 
vice president's action by case number without identifying the accused. 

VII. Appeals of Findings and Penalties 

Should students have cause to question the findings of the court or the action of the vice 
president of the university or both, they have the right to appeal. The channels of appeal are as 
follows: Court findings and/or the administrative action of the vice president of the university may 
be appealed within five days by writing to the president of the university. Further appeal 
procedures will conform to the appeal procedures of the university and of the Policies of the Board 
of Regents, University System of Georgia. 

VIII. Supervision of the Student Court 

As an institutional means of responding to reported infractions of the honor code, the student 
court is ultimately responsible to the president of the university. 

Supervision of the student court will be accomplished ordinarily through the vice president for 
student affairs and the advisors. 

In accordance with Article VI, Section F, of the University Statutes, the vice president for 
student affairs will provide general supervision of the student court and will provide other 
guidance or services as directed by the president of the university. 

IX. Revision of the Honor Code 

Revision will require confirmation by the majority vote of those faculty and student body 
members voting. 

Honors Program 

Armstrong Atlantic's honors program has rapidly developed into a vibrant community of 
students. The program offers talented and motivated students in every department and program 
at Armstrong Atlantic opportunities to take more challenging, smaller classes in the place of 
general education required courses, followed by opportunities to apply their intellectual curiosity 
to independent projects and special classes within their majors. Students are responsible for 
soliciting and evaluating suggestions for new courses, publishing newsletters and web pages, 
organizing social events, and reaching out to prospective honors program students. The honors 
program offers numerous opportunities for students interested in taking leadership positions on 
campus, as well as a number of opportunities beyond the classroom, including a special fall 
orientation, field trips, and social gatherings. Students are active in community service projects 
and participate in regional and national conferences. The program is based in the honors classroom 
and lounge, a comfortable facility with a friendly and collegial atmosphere and some of the most 
powerful computers on campus. Current enrollment in the honors program is about 125. A limited 
number of scholarships are available for qualified students who meet and maintain high standards 
of academic performance. For more information and an application form, please contact the 
coordinator of the honors program, Dr. Mark Finlay, 912/921-5642, (fax) 912/921-5581, or 
mark_finlay @ mailgate.armstrong.edu. 

The program consists of two parts, honors in the core and honors in the major. 



ACADEMIC POLICIES AND PROGRAMS 55 



Honors in the Core. Honors students complete the honors in the core requirement by earning 
a B or better in four of the following courses: 

HIST 1 1 12H - Honors Civilization II 

ENGL 1 102H - Honors Composition 11 

ENGL 2100H - Honors Literature 

MATH 1 161 - Calculus I or MATH 2072 - Calculus II 

PSYC 1 10 1H - Honors General Psychology 

CHEM 1212H - Honors Principles of Chemistry II 

Honors in the Major. Honors students complete the honors in the major component by 
satisfying the requirements specified by the major area and approved by the honors committee. 
These requirements may include a specific course or an independently designed research project, 
paper, or performance. 

Graduation with Honors. Students will graduate with honors by completing honors in the 
core and honors in the major, and graduating with a 3.2 grade point average. The achievement will 
be noted on the diploma and the college transcript. Honors program graduates may also receive 
one of the traditional Latin honors. 

General Degree Requirements 

Each student is responsible for fulfilling the requirements of the degree program chosen in 
accordance with the regulations of the university catalog. 

Application for Graduation. Students must pay all fees before degrees will be conferred. 
Students must submit to the cashier a completed application for graduation form two semesters 
before graduation. Candidates for degrees, unless excused in writing by the president, vice 
president and dean of faculty, vice president for student affairs, or dean of academic and 
enrollment services, must attend the graduation exercises at which degrees are to be conferred. 

Catalog in Effect. Students will normally graduate under the catalog in effect at the time of 
their admission to the university. However, in light of semester conversion in fall 1 998 and other 
issues, it is recommended that students meet with their academic advisors. In the College of Health 
Professions, students will graduate under the catalog in effect at the time of admission or 
readmission (whichever is more current) to a particular health professions program. In the College 
of Education, students will graduate under the catalog in effect at the time of admission to the 
teacher education program. However, Armstrong Atlantic State University reserves the right to 
change any provision listed in this catalog, including but not limited to academic requirements for 
graduation, without actual notice to individual students. All new and readmitted students must 
follow semester requirements. 

Course Requirement Exceptions: Exceptions to course requirements for a degree are 
permitted only with the written approval of the appropriate dean, upon the recommendation of the 
department head. However, all exceptions to core curriculum requirements must have the 
approval of the dean of the College of Arts and Sciences. 

Credit Hour Requirements. To qualify for the baccalaureate degree, a student must earn at 
Armstrong Atlantic at least 30 semester hours of credit applicable toward the degree. Addition- 
ally, the student must complete successfully at Armstrong Atlantic at least half of the upper 
division credits required in the major field of study. For students in teacher education programs. 
the major field of study is the teaching field. For the associate degree, a student must complete at 
least 30 semester hours of course work at Armstrong Atlantic State University. Armstrong 
Atlantic students enrolled in the cooperative degree programs with Savannah State (Jniversit) 's 
College of Business Education may be exempted from these requirements by a recommendation 
of the dean of the College of Education, concurrence by the education curriculum committee, and 
approval of the committee on academic standing. 



56 ARMSTRONG ATLANTIC STATE UNIVERSITY 



Double Major. Students wishing to receive a double major must satisfy major requirements 
of both disciplines including all residency and institutional requirements for each major. Only one 
major will appear on the diploma. Both majors will be designated on the transcript. 

Exit Exams. All students must take major field and general education exit examinations. 

History and Constitution Requirements. By state law, every student who receives a diploma 
or certificate from a school supported by the state of Georgia must demonstrate proficiency in 
United States history and constitution and in Georgia history and constitution. See area E in the 
core curriculum, and the section entitled State Requirement in History and Constitution following 
the core curriculum and Regents' Test information. 

Maximum Hours by Correspondence, Extension, or Examination. Not more than one- 
fourth of the work counted toward a degree may consist of courses taken by correspondence, 
extension, or examination. No correspondence courses may be used to meet the requirements in 
the major field or related fields for the bachelor's degree, or in English composition or foreign 
language. No correspondence courses may be taken while students are enrolled at Armstrong 
Atlantic without prior approval of the appropriate dean and department head. 

Minimum Grade Point Average. Students must earn a grade point average of 2.0 or better 
in each of the following: 

• all work at Armstrong Atlantic; 

• overall (all course work attempted excluding repeats); 

• all courses in the major field. 

Some degrees have higher grade point average requirements. Check your program of study for 
complete details. 

Minors. Armstrong Atlantic offers minors or minor concentrations in a number of academic 
areas. To earn minors students must complete all upper division requirements at Armstrong 
Atlantic. 

Physical Education Requirements. All students who are enrolled in degree programs must 
adhere to the Armstrong Atlantic State University physical education requirements. 

Regents' Test. All students must successfully complete the Regents' Test. (Please see 
Regents' Testing Program following the section on the core curriculum for details.) Candidates 
for a second baccalaureate degree are exempt from the Regents' Test requirement. 

Repeating Courses. When a course is repeated, only the last grade earned counts in earned 
hours requirements, grade point average hours, points and overall grade point average. All course 
work taken remains on a students' academic records. Students may repeat any course. However, 
the grade earned in the last attempt will determine the number of quality points assigned for 
calculation of grade point average. 

Second Baccalaureate Degree. A candidate for a second baccalaureate degree from Armstrong 
Atlantic State University must earn a minimum of 30 additional credit hours and meet all 
requirements for the degree. The final grade point average for the second baccalaureate degree will 
be based only on courses taken after completion of the first baccalaureate degree (whether courses 
were earned at Armstrong Atlantic or at another institution). 

General Education Outcomes 

General education outcomes define the intellectual experience that Armstrong Atlantic State 
University students complete prior to graduation, regardless of their specific degrees or their 
career choices. These outcomes emphasize the central body of knowledge and skills that define 
a "college-educated" person and are grounded in the arts, humanities, mathematics, social and 
natural sciences. They foster a knowledgeable, curious, critical, and reflective frame of mind in 
every graduate. The Armstrong Atlantic State University general education outcomes encourage 
the broad enhancement of each person's capabilities and promote the development of skills in 
communication, problem solving, and lifelong learning needed for individual growth and social 



ACADEMIC POLICIES AND PROGRAMS 



57 



improvement. All students must take an exit examination covering those general education 
outcomes prior to graduation. 

The following general education outcomes include elements from both the university core and 
individual majors: 

A. Demonstrate computer literacy. 

B. Demonstrate effective oral and written communication. 

C. Demonstrate the effective use of traditional and modern sources of information. 

D. Develop an understanding and appreciation of literature and the arts. 

E. Examine the foundations of human values in relation to their moral and ethical implications 
for self and society. 

F. Exhibit knowledge of the history and politics that have shaped diverse societies and cultures. 

G. Exhibit a basic understanding of the sciences and their applications. 

H. Exhibit critical thinking skills and apply problem solving in a variety of situations. 
I. Apply mathematical principles and reasoning across disciplines. 
J. Understand the foundations of physical fitness and health. 

University Core Curriculum 

The semester core curriculum at Armstrong Atlantic State University is required of all 
baccalaureate students. The core recognizes three broad categories of students: non-science 
majors, science majors, and clinical health majors. Major-specific courses are in Area F of the core 
and are different for each major. The majors in each classification are as follows: 



Science Majors 

Applied Physics 

Biology 

Chemistry 

Computer Science 

Mathematics 

Physical Therapy 

RETP (pre-engineering) 



Clinical Health Majors 

Dental Hygiene 

Medical Technology 

Nursing 

Radiologic Technologies 

Respiratory Therapy 



Non-Science Majors 

Art 

Criminal Justice 

Drama/Speech 

Economics 

Education 

English 

General Studies 

Health Science 

History 

Music 

Political Science 

Psychology 

Spanish 

Core Curriculum Notes. 

• Precalculus is required for majors in applied physics, biology, chemistry, computer science, 
mathematics, physical therapy, and radiologic sciences. 

• Calculus is required for RETP students. 

• For non-science majors, the two science courses do not have to be in sequence, and one of the 
science courses may be a non-lab course. 

• Science majors must take a lab science and a specified math course; statistics is required for 
biology and physical therapy majors; calculus I is required for majors in applied physics, 
chemistry, computer science, and mathematics; calculus II is required for RETP. 

• Clinical health majors must take a chemistry or physics sequence; the third course must be 
statistics. 

• If a student who has not yet declared a major is contemplating a science or clinical health major, 
it is recommended that he or she take the area D for that science or clinical health major. 

• The legislative history/constitution requirement can be met by a single course — HIST/POLS 
1100. 

• A course may be used only once to satisfy a degree requirement in a program of study. 



58 ARMSTRONG ATLANTIC STATE UNIVERSITY 

Core Area A: 

Essential Skills 9 hours 

ENGL 1101 - Composition and Rhetoric 3 hours 

ENGL 1 102 - Composition and Literature 3 hours 

One course selected from 

MATH 1111 - College Algebra 3 hours 

or 
MATH 1113 - Pre-calculus Mathematics 

Required for applied physics, biology, chemistry, computer 
science, health, mathematics, and physical therapy majors 

MATH 1161 -Calculus I 4 hours 

Required for RETP students 

Core Area B: 

Institutional Options 4-5 hours 

Ethics and Values 2-3 hours 

One course selected from: 

CHEM 2600 - Ethical Theories and Moral Issues in the Sciences 

ETHC 2000 - Interdisciplinary Ethics 

PHIL 2251 - Introduction to Ethics and Contemporary Moral Philosophy 

POLS 2390 - Human Values and Public Problems 

POLS 1200 - Ethical Theories and Moral Issues in Government 

Global Perspectives 2-3 hours 

One course selected from: 

ANTH 1 150 - Global Perspectives in Anthropology: Peoples of the World 

CHEM 2200 - Science, Technology, and the Modern World 

CRJU 2010 - Universal Justice 

ECON 1150 - Global Economic Problems 

ENGL 2205 - Africa and the Diaspora 

GEOG 1 100 - World Regional Geography 

HIST 1111 - Civilization I 

HIST 11 12 -Civilization II 

HONS 2000 - Honors Topics in Global Perspectives 

POLS 1150 -World Politics 

PUBL/POLS 2250 - International Organizations 

Core Area C: 

Humanities & Fine Arts 6 hours 

Literature or Philosophy 3 hours 

One course selected from: 

ENGL 2100 - Literature and Humanities 

PHIL 2201 - Introduction to Philosophy 

PHIL 225 1 - Introduction to Ethics and Contemporary Moral Philosophy 

Art, Music or Theatre 3 hours 

One course selected from: 

ARTS 1 100 - Art Appreciation 

ARTS/MUSC 1270 - World Art and Music 

ARTS 2710 -Art History I 

ARTS 2720 - Art History II 

MUSC 1 100 - Music Appreciation 

THEA 1 100 - Theatre Appreciation 

THEA 1200 - Introduction to Theatre 

THEA 2410 - Oral Interpretation 



ACADEMIC POLICIES AND PROGRAMS 59 

Core Area D: 

Math, Science & Technology 10-11 hours 

Option 1. Non-Science Majors: 

One lab science course selected from: 4 hours 

BIOL 1 107 - Principles of Biology I 

CHEM 1151/1 15 1L - Survey of Chemistry I 

CHEM 121 1/121 1L - Principles of Chemistry I 

PHYS 1 1 1 1/1 1 1 1L - Introductory Physics I 

PHYS 2211- 221 1L - Principles of Physics 1 

PHSC 121 1/121 1L - Physical Environment 

PHSC 1212/1 21 2L - Chemical Environment 
One science course selected from: 3-4 hours 

BIOL 1 107 - Principles of Biology I 

BIOL 1 108 - Survey of the Animal Kingdom 

BIOL 1 120 - The Diversity of Life 

BIOL 1121- Human Biology 

BIOL 1 122 - Environmental Biology 

CHEM 1151/1 15 1L - Survey of Chemistry I 

CHEM 1 152/1 152L - Survey of Chemistry II 

CHEM 121 1/121 1L - Principles of Chemistry I 

CHEM 1212/1212L - Principles of Chemistry II 

PHYS 1 1 1 1/1 1 1 1L - Introductory Physics I 

PHYS 1112/11 12L - Introductory Physics II 

PHYS 221 1/221 1L - Principles of Physics I 

PHYS 221 2/22 12L - Principles of Physics II 

PHSC 121 1 - Physical Environment 

PHSC 1212 - Chemical Environment 

SCIE 1000 - Introduction to Scientific Inquiry 

ASTR 1010 - Astronomy of the Solar System 

GEOL 2010 - Introduction to Physical Geology 
One course in mathematics, science, or technology chosen from: 3 hours 

BIOL 1 107 - Principles of Biology I 

BIOL 1 108 - Survey of the Animal Kingdom 

BIOL 1 120 - The Diversity of Life 

BIOL 1121 - Human Biology 

BIOL 1122 - Environmental Biology 

CHEM 121 1/121 1L - Principles of Chemistry I 

CHEM 121 2/1 21 2L - Principles of Chemistry II 

PHYS 1 1 1 1/1 1 1 1L - Introductory Physics I 

PHYS 1 1 12/1 1 12L - Introductory Physics II 

PHYS 221 1/221 1L - Principles of Physics I 

PHYS 221 2/22 12L - Principles of Physics II 

PHSC 121 1 - Physical Environment 

PHSC 1212 - Chemical Environment 

SCIE 1000 - Introduction to Scientific Inquiry 

ASTR 1010 - Astronomy of the Solar System 

GEOL 2010 - Introduction to Physical Geology 

MATH 1 1 13 - Precalculus Mathematics 

MATH 1161 -Calculus I 

MATH 1950 - Applied Mathematics for Non-Science Majors 

MATH 2220 - Elementary Statistics 

MATH/CSCI 2252 - Computational Methods in Statistics 

MATH 2900 - The Spirit and Structure of Mathematics 

CSCI 1301 - Introduction to Programming Principles 
Option 2 

a. Science Majors: 

Laboratory science sequence 8 hours 

BIOL 1 107 - Principles of Biology I 



60 ARMSTRONG ATLANTIC STATE UNIVERSITY 



BIOL 1 108 - Survey of the Animal Kingdom 

CHEM 1211/1212 (and labs) - Principles of Chemistry I/II 

PHYS 1111/1112 (and labs) - Introductory Physics I/II 

PHYS 2211/2212 (and labs) - Principles of Physics I/II 
One course in mathemathics, science, or technology 3 hours 

MATH 1161 -Calculus I 

Required for applied physics, chemistry, computer science, and mathematics majors 

MATH 2072 - Calculus II 
Required for RETP students 

MATH 2220 - Elementary Statistics 

Required for biology and physical therapy majors 
b. Clinical Health Majors: 
Chemistry or physics sequence 8 hours 

CHEM 1 151/1152 (and labs) - Survey of Chemistry I/II 

CHEM 1211/1212 (and labs) - Principles of Chemistry I/II 

PHYS 1111/1112 (and labs) - Introductory Physics I/II 

PHYS 2211/2212 (and labs) - Principles of Physics I/II 

One course in mathematics, science, or technology 3 hours 

MATH 2220 - Elementary Statistics 

Core Area E: 

Social Sciences 12 hours 

American and Georgia History and Constitution 3 hours 

HIST/POLS 1 100 - Political History of Georgia 

World Civilization 3 hours 

One course selected from: 

HIST 1111 - Civilization I 

HIST 11 12 -Civilization II 

Social Sciences 3 hours 

One course selected from: 

ANTH 1102 - Introduction of Anthropology 

ECON 2105 - Principles of Macroeconomics 

ECON 2106 - Principles of Microeconomics 

PSYC 1101 - General Psychology 

SOCI 1101 - Introductory Sociology 

Social Sciences 3 hours 

One course selected from: 

ANTH 1 102 - Introduction to Anthropology 

ECON 2105 - Principles of Macroeconomics 

ECON 2106 - Principles of Microeconomics 

PSYC 1101 - General Psychology 

SOCI 1101 - Introductory Sociology 

HIST 1111 - Civilization I 

HIST 11 12 -Civilization II 

HIST 21 1 1 - History of America to 1877 

HIST 21 12 - History of America since 1865 

POLS 2100 - Introduction to Political Science 

Core Area F: 

Courses Suitable to the Major 18 hours 

Physical Education 3 hours 



ACADEMIC POLICIES AND PROGRAMS 61 



Regents' Testing Program 

Each institution of the University System of Georgia shall assure the other institutions, and the 
university system as a whole, that students obtaining a degree from that institution possess certain 
minimum reading and writing skills. The Regents' Testing Program has been developed to help 
attain this goal. The objectives of the testing program are: ( 1 ) to provide system-wide information 
on student competence in reading and writing; and (2) to provide a uniform means of identifying 
students who fail to attain the minimum levels of reading and writing competence. 

Students enrolled in undergraduate degree programs leading to the baccalaureate degree shall 
pass the Regents' Test as a requirement for graduation. Students must take the test in their first 
semester of enrollment after earning 30 credit hours if they have not taken it previously. 
(Institutions may not prohibit students who have earned at least 30 credit hours from taking the 
test for the first time.) At an institution's discretion, students may be permitted to take the test 
during a semester in which they are not enrolled. 

Each institution shall provide an appropriate remediation program and shall require students 
who have not passed both parts of the test by the time they have earned 45 credit hours to take the 
appropriate remedial course(s) every semester of enrollment until they have passed both parts. 

Students with 30 or more semester credit hours transferring from outside of the University 
System of Georgia or from university system programs that do not require the Regents' Test 
should take the test during their first semester of enrollment in a program leading to the 
baccalaureate degree. Those who have not passed before their third semester of enrollment are 
subject to the remediation requirement. 

The Regents' Test is not a system- wide requirement for an associate of applied science degree 
or an associate of science degree in an allied health field, although institutions may choose to 
require the test for these degrees. 

Students holding baccalaureate or higher degrees from regionally accredited institutions of 
higher education will not be required to complete the Regents' Test in order to receive degrees 
from University System of Georgia institutions. 

The Chancellor will issue administrative procedures for the operation of the Regents' Testing 
Program. According to Regents' Testing Program Administration Procedures, institutions may 
increase requirements related to the Regents' testing program, "provided that such increased 
requirements are authorized by the Chancellor and published in the official catalog of the 
institution prior to implementation." Armstrong Atlantic State University has chosen to 
require the test of all undergraduates who have not earned a baccalaureate or higher degree 
regardless of degree objective. 

Testing and Remediation Requirements. 

1 . Students in programs leading to the baccalaureate degree who have not taken the Regents' Test 
must take the test during the semester of enrollment immediately following the completion of 
30 college-level semester credit hours. (College-level credit hours include all credit with the 
exception of institutional credit.) Students attending Armstrong Atlantic State University are 
encouraged to take the Regents' Test during their semester of enrollment in ENGL 1 102, but 
not later than their 30 th credit hour. This requirement applies whether or not students have taken 
or passed specific courses, including English courses, or completed any institutional require- 
ments. Associate degree candidates should see (8). 

2. Passing the Regents' Test is defined as having passed both parts of the test by scoring at or 
above the minimum passing score specified for each component. If one component of the test 
has been passed, that component need not be retaken. 

3. Students who have earned 45 college-level semester credit hours and have not passed the 
Regents' Test shall take the appropriate non-degree credit course(s) in remedial reading and/ 
or writing in every semester of attendance until they have passed all components of the test 

4. Students with 45 college-level semester credit hours who have not passed either part of the test 
are required to take remediation in both reading and writing each semester. Excepted from this 
are students taking one remedial course and no college-level credit courses. 



62 ARMSTRONG ATLANTIC STATE UNIVERSITY 



5. Students with fewer than 45 semester hours of college-level credit are not required by the 
Board of Regents to take remediation and may be permitted to retake the test without 
remediation. However, Armstrong Atlantic State University students may ( a) be required to 
take remediation; or (b) be eligible to appeal required remediation; or (c) be able to schedule 
remediation at their convenience as long as they have fewer than 45 semester credit hours. 

6. First-time examinees must take both parts of the test. Students may take the test before they 
have earned 30 hours, while enrolled in ENGL 1102. Students may take the test during a 
semester in which they are not enrolled. Students who have failed both parts of the Regents' 
Test may take the reading and essay portions of the test in separate semesters. 

7. Passage of the Regents' Test shall not be a condition of transfer into an institution. All 
transferring students from programs leading to the baccalaureate degree within the University 
System of Georgia shall be subject to all provisions of this policy. Students with 30 or more 
semester credit hours transferring from university system programs that do not require the 
Regents' Test or from institutions outside the system should take the test during their first 
semester of enrollment in a program leading to the baccalaureate degree. Those who have not 
passed before their third semester of enrollment are subject to the remediation requirement. 
Associate degree candidates should see (8). 

8. The Regents' Test is not a requirement of the Board of Regents for an associate of applied 
science degree or an associate of science degree in an allied health field, although institutions 
may choose to require the test for these degrees. The Regents' Test is a requirement of 
Armstrong Atlantic State University for all undergraduates who have not earned a 
baccalaureate or higher degree regardless of degree objective. 

Guidelines for Remedial Courses. 

1. Separate courses in remediation for the reading (RGTR 0198) and the essay (RGTR 0199) 
portions of the test are to be provided. Courses developed for other purposes, such as those for 
learning support or regular credit English, may not be used to fulfill Regents' Test remediation 
requirements. 

2. Regents' Test remedial courses are to be classified as a regular part of students' academic 
loads, resulting in institutional credit, and should be handled as part of the regular registration 
procedure. 

Special Categories of Students. 

1. Students holding baccalaureate or higher degrees from accredited institutions of higher 
education will not be required to complete the Regents' Test in order to receive a degree from 
a University System of Georgia institution. 

2. Each institution may develop special procedures for certifying the competence of students 
whose native language is not English. Granting extended time and allowing use of translation 
dictionaries are permissible accommodations for the essay examination. 

3. Each institution shall develop special procedures for certifying the competence of students 
with disabilities. Students who are eligible should consult the director of disability services. 

4. Students who took the Regents' Test before fall quarter, 1980, and who failed the reading 
portion of the Regents' Test shall not be held to a higher passing standard at a subsequent 
retaking of the test than was in effect at the time of their original attempt. 

5. Students who have moved out of state after completing all requirements for graduation with 
the exception of the Regents' Test requirement may be permitted to have the Regents' Test 
administered out of state if they have fulfilled remediation requirements and follow the 
procedures outlined in the Regents ' Testing Program Administration Manual. (For informa- 
tion, consult the Regents' Test administrator in the Division of Student Affairs.) 

Essay Review. Students may request a formal review of failure on the essay component of the 
Regents' Test if that essay received at least one passing score among the three scores awarded. The 
review procedure shall be as follows: 

1 . Students must request the review by mid-term of the first semester of enrollment after the 
semester in which the essay was failed. The review must be initiated, however, within one 
calendar year from the semester in which the essay failure occurred. Students at Armstrong 



ACADEMIC POLICIES AND PROGRAMS 63 



Atlantic may request an essay review in the Division of Student Affairs. Only reviews 
processed in the first two weeks of the semester will be answered before the next Regents' Test. 

2. All applicable regulations of the Regents' Test policy remain in effect for students whose 
essays are under review, including those regulations concerning remediation and retaking the 
test. 

3. Review is initiated at the campus level, with procedural matters to be determined by the 
institution. The on-campus review will be conducted by three faculty members designated by 
the institution as a review panel. The on-campus review panel may (a) sustain, by majority 
opinion, the essay's failing score, thus terminating the review process; or (b) recommend, by 
majority opinion, the re-scoring of the essay by the Regents' testing program central office. 
Students will be notified of the results of the on-campus review. A decision by the on-campus 
review panel to terminate the review process is final. 

4. If the on-campus panel recommends that the essay be re-scored, that recommendation will be 
transmitted in writing, along with the essay, to the office of the system director of the Regents' 
testing program. The director will engage three experienced Regents' essay scorers (not those 
involved in the original scoring of the essay) to review the essay following normal Regents' 
Test essay scoring procedures. The decision of this panel on the merits of the essay will be final, 
thus terminating the review process. Students will be notified of review results through the 
institution (Armstrong Atlantic). 

Health Professions Program Requirement. Before students in health professions programs 
may enter their last semester, they must have passed the Regents' Test. 

State Requirement In History and Constitution 

By state law, every student who receives a diploma or certificate from a school supported by 
the state of Georgia must demonstrate proficiency in United States history and constitution and 
in Georgia history and constitution. Students at Armstrong Atlantic State University may 
demonstrate such proficiency in one of the following ways: 

• successfully complete HIST/POLS 1 100 at Armstrong Atlantic; 

• successfully complete a course that equates to HIST/POLS 1 1 00 at another University System 
of Georgia (USG) institution; 

• successfully complete a course or combination of courses in American government and history 
which meets the state requirement at another USG institution; 

• successfully complete a course or combination of courses in American government and history 
at a non-USG institution and pass a local test on the Georgia contitution; 

• earn an acceptable score on the CLEP: American government exam and pass a local test on the 
Georgia constitution. 

Requirements for Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Science Degrees 

Requirements for major programs leading to baccalaureate degrees are described in the 
departmental listings. For baccalaureate degrees, a minimum of 1 20 semester hours, exclusive of 
the required physical education course(s), is required for graduation. Exit exams in the major and 
in general education are also required. All students in baccalaureate programs must complete the 
60-hour core curriculum requirement (as listed under University Core Curriculum), along with the 
3-hour physical education requirement. 

Degree Programs 

The degree programs of Armstrong Atlantic State University are here presented by college and 
department. (For an alphabetical listing by academic subject, see the front of the catalog.) Minor 
and certificate programs are listed in their sponsoring departments. The university is organized 



64 



ARMSTRONG ATLANTIC STATE UNIVERSITY 



into three colleges and one school, each administered by a dean, and two non-school affiliated 
departments (military and naval science, listed under Special Programs). The degrees offered by 
Armstrong Atlantic are as follows: 



College of Arts and Sciences 

Degree 

Associate of Arts 

Associate of Applied Science in Criminal Justice 

Bachelor of Arts in: 
Art 

Drama/Speech 
Economics 
English 

English (Communications) 
English with Teacher Certification 
History 

History with Teacher Certification 
Music 
Political Science 

Political Science (Public Administration) 

Political Science with Teacher Certification 

Psychology 

Psychology Leading to Teacher Certification 
in Special Education: Behavior Disorders 
Spanish 
Spanish with Teacher Certification (P-12) 

Bachelor of General Studies 

Bachelor of Music Education 

Bachelor of Science in: 
Applied Physics 
Biology 

Biology with Teacher Certification 
Chemistry 

Chemistry with Teacher Certification 
Computer Science 
Criminal Justice 

Mathematical Sciences 

Mathematical Sciences with Teacher Certification 

Bachelor of Science in Education in Art Education 

Master of Arts in History 

Master of Science in Criminal Justice 



Department 

Interdepartmental 

Criminal Justice, Social and Political 
Science 

Art, Music, and Theatre 

Art, Music, and Theatre 

Economics 

Languages, Literature, and Philosophy 

Languages, Literature, and Philosophy 

Languages, Literature, and Philosophy 

History 

History 

Art, Music, and Theatre 

Criminal Justice, Social and Political 

Science 
Criminal Justice, Social and Political 

Science 
Criminal Justice, Social and Political 

Science 
Psychology 

Psychology 

Languages, Literature, and Philosophy 

Languages, Literature, and Philosophy 

Interdepartmental 

Art, Music, and Theatre 

Chemistry and Physics 

Biology 

Biology 

Chemistry and Physics 

Chemistry and Physics 

Computer Science 

Criminal Justice, Social and Political 

Science 
Mathematics 
Mathematics 

Art, Music, and Theatre 

History 

Criminal Justice, Social and Political 
Science 



ACADEMIC POLICIES AND PROGRAMS 



65 



College of Education 

Degree 

Bachelor of Science in Education in: 

Art Education (P- 12) 

Early Childhood Education (PK-5) 

Middle Grades Education (4-8) 

Business Education* 

Health and Physical Education 

Social Science Education 

Speech-Language Pathology 
Master of Education in: 

Elementary Education 

Middle Grades Education 

Secondary Education 
Business Education* 
English Education 
Mathematics Education 
Broadfield Science Education 
Broadfield Social Science Education 

Special Education 
Behavior Disorders 
Learning Disabilities 
Speech/Language Pathology 



Department 

Early Childhood Education 
Early Childhood Education 
Middle/Secondary Education 
Middle/Secondary Education 
Health and Physical Education 
Middle/Secondary Education 
Special Education 

Early Childhood Education 
Middle/Secondary Education 

Middle/Secondary Education 
Middle/Secondary Education 
Middle/Secondary Education 
Middle/Secondary Education 
Middle/Secondary Education 

Special Education 
Special Education 
Special Education 



Other Degree Programs. The College of Education, working with the College of Arts and 
Sciences, provides baccalaureate degrees with teacher certification in the secondary fields of 
biology, chemistry, English, history, mathematical sciences, music, political science, and Span- 
ish; and in psychology leading to special education certification for behavior disorders. See the 
departmental sections in the College of Arts and Sciences listings for degree particulars. 



^Offered in conjunction with Savannah State University. 

College of Health Professions 

Degree 

Associate of Science in Dental Hygiene 
Bachelor of Health Science 
Bachelor of Science in: 

Dental Hygiene Education 

Medical Technology 

Nursing 

Physical Therapy* 

Radiologic Technologies 

Respiratory Therapy 
Master of Health Services Administration 
Master of Public Health 
Master of Science in: 

Nursing 

Physical Therapy 



Department 

Dental Hygiene 
Health Science 

Dental Hygiene 
Medical Technology 
Nursing 

Physical Therapy 
Radiologic Sciences 
Respiratory Therapy 
Health Science 
Health Science 

Nursing 
Physical Therapy 



* Awarded only in conjunction with the master's degree in physical therapy. 



66 ARMSTRONG ATLANTIC STATE UNIVERSITY 

School of Graduate Studies 

Emma Simon, Dean 

Philosophy and Goals 

Graduate programs at Armstrong Atlantic State University are designed to provide students 
with the opportunity and resources to enhance their educational, professional, and cultural 
backgrounds while improving their professional skills and competence. Graduate programs 
encourage scholarly inquiry through the appropriate application of valid research methods. 

Degrees 

Armstrong Atlantic State University is authorized to grant the following graduate degrees: 
Master of Arts 

History 
Master of Education 
Elementary Education 
Middle Grades Education 
Secondary Education 
Business Education* 
English Education 
Mathematics Education 
Broadfield Science Education 
Broadfield Social Science Education 
Special Education 
Behavior Disorders 
Learning Disabilities 
Speech/Language Pathology 
Master of Health Services Administration 
Master of Public Health 
Master of Science 
Criminal Justice 
Nursing 

Physical Therapy 
*Offered in conjunction with Savannah State University. 

Admission to Graduate Study 

Graduates of colleges or universities accredited by a regional accrediting association may apply 
for admission to the School of Graduate Studies. Admission is restricted to include only those 
students whose academic records indicate that they can successfully complete graduate work. 

Immunization Requirements. In order to comply with University System of Georgia 
policies, all new students attending Armstrong Atlantic State University will be required to submit 
a Certificate of Immunization for measles, mumps, and rubella prior to registering for classes. 

Graduate Catalog 

Please refer to the Armstrong Atlantic State University Graduate Catalog for additional information 
on admission procedures and requirements. The graduate catalog also contains information on graduate 
programs, courses, faculty, financial aid opportunities, and academic policies. 

Copies of the graduate catalog are available from: 

School of Graduate Studies 

Armstrong Atlantic State University 

Savannah, GA 31419 

912/927-5377 

or 

Office of Admissions 

Armstrong Atlantic State University 

Savannah, GA 31419 

912/927-5277 

800/633-2349 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 67 

College of Arts and Sciences 

Grace Martin, Interim Dean 
Henry Harris, Associate Dean 

Philosophy and Goals 

The College of Arts and Sciences offers students a broad range of educational opportunities 
in course offerings encompassing the scope of human thought and knowledge. The college 
provides the core curriculum of the university - courses in the arts, humanities, mathematics, 
natural sciences, and social sciences required of all students. (For details, see General Education 
Outcomes in this catalog.) Beyond these basics, arts and sciences curricula enable students to 
pursue studies in their chosen majors, exploring theories, methodologies, and broader implica- 
tions under the guidance of trained scholars and researchers. Major programs may culminate in 
a "senior experience" - an internship, a capstone course, or a senior thesis - designed to help 
students comprehend their fields as a whole. 

Courses of study are designed to cultivate critical thinking, problem-solving skills, and ethical 
sensitivity in order to equip students for careers, provide a foundation for graduate or professional 
study, and create life-long learners. Academic offerings are supplemented by an annual schedule 
of more than one hundred lectures, field trips, faculty and student recitals and concerts, plays and 
exhibits - most open to the general public. 

Organization and Degrees 

The College of Arts and Sciences includes the Departments of Art, Music and Theatre; 
Biology; Chemistry and Physics; Computer Science; Criminal Justice, Social and Political 
Science; Economics; History; Languages, Literature, and Philosophy; Mathematics; Psychology; 
and Military Science. In addition, degree programs in General Studies provide an opportunity for 
broader sampling of the fields listed. The degrees offered in the College of Arts and Sciences are 
as follows: 

Associate of Arts 

Associate of Applied Science in Criminal Justice 

Bachelor of Arts in: 

Art 

Drama/Speech 

Economics 

English 

English (Communications) 

English with Teacher Certification 

History 

History with Teacher Certification 

Music 

Political Science 

Political Science (Public Administration) 

Political Science with Teacher Certification 

Psychology 

Psychology Leading to Teacher Certification in Special Education: Behavior Disorders 

Spanish 

Spanish with Teacher Certification (P-12) 
Bachelor of General Studies 
Bachelor of Music Education 
Bachelor of Science in: 

Applied Physics 

Biology 

Biology with Teacher Certification 



68 ARMSTRONG ATLANTIC STATE UNIVERSITY 



Chemistry 

Chemistry with Teacher Certification 

Computer Science 

Criminal Justice 

Mathematical Sciences 

Mathematical Sciences with Teacher Certification 
Bachelor of Science in Education in: 

Art Education (P- 12) 
Master of Arts in History 
Master of Science in Criminal Justice 

Those interested in detailed information on graduate programs should refer to the School of 
Graduate Studies section of this catalog and to the Armstrong Atlantic State University Graduate 
Catalog. 

Additional information on all undergraduate programs and teacher certification options is 
found in the sections of the appropriate departments. Information on military science is located 
in the Special Programs section. Teacher certification programs are offered in cooperation with 
the College of Education, approved by the Georgia State Professional Standards Commission, and 
accredited by the National Council for Teacher Education. Detailed information on teacher 
certification programs is found in the College of Education section of this catalog. 

Minors 

Departments in the College of Arts and Sciences offer a number of minors. Students may 
include one or more minors in their programs as circumstances permit. Requirements for specific 
minors are listed in the section for each department. No courses used to satisfy the requirements 
of core areas A through E can be counted toward a minor. Minors earned are noted on students' 
transcripts. 



GENERAL STUDIES 

Richard Nordquist, Director 

General Information 

General Studies associate and baccalaureate degree programs operate under the general 
guidance of the dean of the College of Arts and Sciences and the immediate supervision of the 
director of General Studies. Two general studies degrees are offered: the associate of arts, 
providing a substantial liberal education as a base for upper-division specialization; and the 
bachelor of general studies, designed primarily for mature students with clearly defined academic 
and career goals. Faculty advisors from appropriate departments of the university provide 
curriculum guidance in particular areas of concentration. Working closely with both the general 
studies director and faculty advisors, students prepare individual programs of study consistent 
with their own plans and expectations. Up to one-fourth of the credit required for the bachelor of 
general studies degree may be satisfied through successful completion of Armstrong Atlantic- 
approved examinations and university-level independent study courses. To accommodate the 
needs of nontraditional students, advisement sessions can be scheduled during the evenings and 
on Saturdays, as well as on weekdays. Interested students should contact the director to schedule 
appointments. 

Special Programs 

The associate of arts degree is also available through the Liberty Center in Hinesville, Georgia. 
For further information, contact the Armstrong Atlantic counselor at the Fort Stewart Army 
Education Center. 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 69 



The bachelor of general studies degree is also available at the Brunswick Center on the campus 
of Coastal Georgia Community College in Brunswick, Georgia. Contact the director of the 
Brunswick Center for more information. 

Progress Requirements 

For the associate of arts degree, students must complete at least 1 8 semester hours of required 
course work and 27 hours of all course work in this program at Armstrong Atlantic State 
University. 

For the bachelor of general studies degree, students must submit degree proposals to the 
general studies director for approval at least two semesters prior to anticipated graduation. No 
more than two Ds in the major may be earned in general studies courses, and all grades in the area 
of concentration must be C or better. 

PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF ASSOCIATE OF ARTS 

A. General Requirements (Core Areas A, B, C, D, and E) 42 hours 

Physical Education 2 hours 

B. Courses in the Concentration and/or Electives 18 hours 

Students planning work toward a baccalaureate degree should select courses that meet listed 
requirements of that degree program. 

Total Semester Hours 62 hours 

PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF GENERAL STUDIES 

A. General Requirements (Core Areas A, B, C, D, and E) 42 hours 

Core Area F 18 hours 

Two courses selected from: 

ARTS 1 100 - Art Appreciation 

ARTS 2710 -Art History I 

ARTS 2720 - Art History II 

ARTS 1270/MUSC 1270 - World Art and Music 

PHIL 2201 - Introduction to Philosophy 

PHIL 225 1 - Ethics and Contemporary Moral Philosophy 

THEA 1 100 - Theatre Appreciation 

THEA 1200 - Introduction to Theatre 

Two foreign language courses in sequence (numbered 1002 and higher) 
Two courses selected from: 

ANTH 1 102 - Introduction to Anthropology 

CSCI 1050 - Introduction to Computer Concepts and Applications 

CSCI 1060 - Computer Concepts and Applications for Science Students 

CSCI 1301 - Introduction to Programming Principles 

ECON 2105 - Principles of Macroeconomics 

ECON 2106 - Principles of Microeconomics 

HIST 21 1 1 - History of America to 1877 

HIST 2112 - History of American Since 1865 

PSYC 1 101/H - General Psychology/Honors 

SOCI 1101 - Introductory Sociology 
Any two core area D courses (not used for core area D) 
Physical Education 3 hours 

B. Major Field Courses 

Minimum of 39 hours at 3000 level or above 

Maximum of 27 hours in any discipline (excluding courses taken under General Requirements j 

No more than two D's in the General Studies section 

At least 9 of the 18 hours in the General Studies section must be completed at Armstrong 

Atlantic 



70 ARMSTRONG ATLANTIC STATE UNIVERSITY 



General Studies 18 hours 

Must be at 2000 level or above 
Humanities (3-6 hours) 

Choice of: 

Art, literature, history, music, philosophy, theatre 
Social Sciences (3-6 hours) 

Choice of: 

Anthropology, criminal justice, economics, geography, political science, 

psychology, public history, sociology 
Math, Natural Science, and Technology (3-6 hours) 

Choice of: 

Astronomy, biology, chemistry, computer science, geology, mathematics, 

meteorology, oceanography, physics 
Communication Arts (3-6 hours) 

Choice of: 

Advanced composition, communications, film, foreign languages, 

journalism, linguistics, rhetoric, technical and business writing 

Area of Concentration 15-18 hours 

Any University System approved minor 
No grade lower than C 
C. Electives 24-27 hours 



Total Semester Hours 123 

D. Regents' Test and Exit Exam 

ART, MUSIC, AND THEATRE 

Faculty 

James Anderson, Department Head 

Scott Buchanan Mark Johnson 

Tom Cato Peter Mellen 

Rachel Green Jill Miller 

Kevin Hampton Randall Reese 

Robert Harris John Schmidt 

John Jensen Lucinda Schultz 
Linda Jensen 

Accreditation 

Programs in music are accredited by the National Association of Schools of Music for the 
period 1995-2005. 

General Information 

The Department of Art, Music, and Theatre offers the bachelor of arts degree with majors in 
art, music, and drama/speech; the bachelor of music education degree; and in cooperation with the 
College of Education, the bachelor of science in education in art education. 

Special Programs 

Directed individual study (DIS) has a distinctly useful place in the art, music, and theatre 
curriculum. The DIS provides an enrichment experience otherwise unavailable in the classroom. 
Normally, regular curriculum coursework should not be completed by individual study. 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 71 



Admission Requirements 

College-level study of art, music, and theatre requires considerable background as well as basic 
proficiency. Students wishing to major in art are expected to present a portfolio of previous work 
in at least one medium. All entering students in music (including transfer students) must take 
placement examinations as appropriate in applied music, music theory, and music history. Course 
work at other institutions in studio art may not be counted towards graduation until a portfolio of 
artwork is submitted demonstrating competency in areas in which classes have been completed. 

Special Requirements 

A variety of departmental policies and regulations affects music majors, including require- 
ments for recital attendance, ensemble participation, piano proficiency, recital participation, 
applied music levels, and the Rising Junior Applied Music Examination. These rules are listed in 
the Handbook of Policies and Regulations for Music Majors, available in the departmental office. 

Please see the Fees section of this catalog for information on applied music fees. 

Minors 

Art 18 hours 

ARTS 1020 or ARTS 1030 

ARTS 2710 or ARTS 2720 

One lower division studio art course 

Three upper division art courses from the art studio and/or art history areas 
Theatre 15 hours 

Three semester hours from: THEA 1 100, 1200, 2270, 2410 

Twelve semester hours from: any 3000-4000 level THEA courses 

PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF ARTS IN ART 

A. General Requirements 

Core Areas A, B, C, D, and E 42 hours 

Core Area F 18 hours 

ARTS 1010 -Drawing I 

ARTS 1011 -Drawing II 

ARTS 1020 -2D Design 

ARTS 1030 - 3D Design 

ARTS 2011 -Painting I 

ARTS 2710 -Art History I 

Physical Education 3 hours 

B. Major Field Courses 39 hours 

ARTS 2012 -Painting II 

ARTS 2040 - Photography 
ARTS 2150 - The Computer in Art 
ARTS 2400 - Introduction to Craft 
ARTS 2720 - Art History II 
ARTS 3130 -Drawing III 
ARTS 3300 - Ceramics I 
ARTS 3400 - Printmaking I 
ARTS 3700 - Figure Sculpture 
ARTS 3750 - Contemporary Art & Criticism 
ARTS 4700 - Senior Portfolio 

Two studio courses (3000 and above) from one of the following areas: drawing and painting, 
sculpture, ceramics, crafts, or photography 



72 ARMSTRONG ATLANTIC STATE UNIVERSITY 



C. Related Field Courses 6 hours 

Foreign Language 1002 - Elementary Language II 

Foreign Language 2001 - Intermediate Language I 

D. Electives 15 hours 

15 semester hours of courses at the 3000 level or above 



Total Semester Hours 123 hours 

E. Regents' Test and Exit Exam 

PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF ARTS IN MUSIC 

A. General Requirements 

Core Areas A, B, C, D, and E 42 hours 

Core Area F 18 hours 

MUSC 1 1 1 1 - Music Theory I 

MUSC 1 1 12 - Music Theory II 

MUSC 1 130 (2 semesters) - Keyboard Harmony 

MUSC 1400 (2 semesters) - Applied Music 

MUSC 21 1 1 - Intermediate Theory I 

MUSC 2130 (1 semester) - Advanced Keyboard Harmony 

MUSC 2400 (1 semester) - Applied Music 

MUSC 2540 - Concert Choir or 2560 (3 semesters) - Wind Ensemble 

Physical Education 3 hours 

B. Major Field Courses 27 hours 

MUSC 1000 (7 semesters) - Recital Attendance 

MUSC 21 12 - Intermediate Theory II 

MUSC 2 1 30 (2 semesters) - Advanced Keyboard Harmony (in addition to Area F requirements) 

MUSC 2400 (1 semester) - Applied Music (in addition to Area F requirement) 

MUSC 2540 (1 semester) - Concert Choir or MUSC 2560 (1 semester) - Wind Ensemble 

(in addition to Area F requirement) 
MUSC 2810 - Conducting 
MUSC 3400 (2 semesters) - Applied Music 
MUSC 3710 - Music History I 
MUSC 3720 - Music History II 

MUSC 3540 (2 semesters) - Concert Choir or MUSC 3560 (2 semesters) - Wind Ensemble 
Two courses selected from: 

MUSC 3120 - Form and Analysis 

MUSC 3610 - Orchestration and Arranging 

MUSC 4120 - Counterpoint 
One course selected from: 

MUSC 4160 - Topics in Repertoire and Techniques 

MUSC 4250 - Piano Pedagogy 

MUSC 4270 - Vocal Pedagogy 

C. Concentration Electives 21 hours 

Select one of the following track options: 

Liberal Arts 

2 1 hours of electives with 1 8 semester hours at the 3000 level or above and at least one music 
course at the 3000 level or above 
Keyboard Performance 

MUSC 2580 - Keyboard Accompanying 

MUSC 4200 - Piano Literature I 

MUSC 4210 - Piano Literature II 

MUSC 4400 (2 semesters) - Applied Music 

1 1 hours of electives with 10 semester hours at the 3000 level or above 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 73 



Vocal Performance 

MUSC2171 - Lyric Diction I 
MUSC 2172 - Lyric Diction II 
MUSC 4400 (2 semesters) - Applied Music 

One course selected from: (cannot be duplicated with major courses) 
MUSC 3120 - Form and Analysis 
MUSC 3610 - Orchestration & Arranging 
MUSC 4120 - Counterpoint 
1 1 hours of electives at the 3000 level or above 
Instrument Performance (Wind or Percussion) 
MUSC 4400 (2 semesters) - Applied Music 
MUSC 4810 - Advanced Instrumental Conducting 
One course selected from: (cannot be duplicated with major courses) 
MUSC 3120 - Form and Analysis 
MUSC 3610 - Orchestration & Arranging 
MUSC 4120 - Counterpoint 
13 hours of electives with 10 semester hours at the 3000 level or above 
Composition 

MUSC 41 10 (8 semester hours) - Composition 
One course selected from: (cannot be duplicated with major courses) 
MUSC 3120 - Form and Analysis 
MUSC 3610 - Orchestration & Arranging 
MUSC 4120 - Counterpoint 
1 1 hours of electives with 10 semester hours at the 3000 level or above 

D. Related Field Courses 12 hours 

Foreign Language 1002 - Elementary Language II 
Foreign Language 2001 - Intermediate Language I 
ARTS 2720 - Art History II 
ARTS 3750 - Contemporary Art and Criticism 



Total Semester Hours 123 hours 

E. Regents' Test, General Education Exit Exam, Piano Proficiency Exam, Major Field 
Exit Exam, and Graduation Recital 

PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF MUSIC EDUCATION 

A. General Requirements 

Core Areas A, B, C, D, and E 42 hours 

Area F 18 hours 

MUSC 1111 - Music Theory I 

MUSC 1 1 12 - Music Theory II 

MUSC 1 130 (2 semesters) - Keyboard Harmony 

MUSC 21 1 1 - Intermediate Theory I 

MUSC 2130 (1 semester) - Advanced Keyboard Harmony 

MUSC 1400 (2 semesters) - Applied Music 

MUSC 2400 (1 semester) - Applied Music 

MUSC 2540 (3 semesters) - Concert Choir or 2560 (3 sem) - Wind Ensemble 

Physical Education 3 hours 

B. Major Field Courses 34 hours 

MUSC 1000 (7 semesters) - Recital Attendance 

MUSC 21 12 - Intermediate Theory II 

MUSC 2130 (1 semester) - Advanced Keyboard Harmony (in addition to Area F requirement) 

MUSC 2360 - Brass Methods 

MUSC 2370 - Woodwind Methods 

MUSC 2380 - Percussion Methods 



74 ARMSTRONG ATLANTIC STATE UNIVERSITY 



MUSC 2390 - String and Guitar Methods 

MUSC 2400 ( 1 semester) - Applied Music (in addition to Area F requirement) 

MUSC 2540 - Concert Choir (1 semester) or MUSC 2560 (1 semester) - Wind Ensemble 

(in addition to Area F requirement) 
MUSC 2810 -Conducting 
MUSC 3120 - Form and Analysis 
MUSC 3300 - Music Teaching in Lower Schools I 
MUSC 3310 - Music Teaching in Middle and High School 
MUSC 3400 - (2 semesters) - Applied Music 

MUSC 3540 - Concert Choir or MUSC 3560 (2 semesters) Wind Ensemble 
MUSC 3610 - Orchestration and Arranging 
MUSC 3710 - Music History I 
MUSC 3720 - Music History II 
MUSC 4120 - Counterpoint 

C. Concentration Electives 12 hours 

Select one of the following track options: 

Choral 

MUSC 1300 (2 semesters voice or piano) - Applied Music 

MUSC 2171 - Lyric Diction I 

MUSC 3340 - Choral Methods 

MUSC 4230 - Choral Repertoire 

MUSC 4270 - Vocal Pedagogy 

MUSC 4800 - Advanced Choral Conducting 
Instrumental 

MUSC 1300 (2 semesters woodwinds, brass or percussion) - Applied Music 

MUSC 2270 - Class Voice (two semesters) 

MUSC 3330 - Band Methods 

MUSC 4240 - Band Repertoire 

MUSC 4280 - Marching Band Techniques 

MUSC 4810 - Advanced Instrumental Conducting 
Elementary 

MUSC 1300 and/or MUSC 2240 - Class Guitar 

(2 semesters in two secondary areas selected from piano accompanying, voice, guitar) 

MUSC 2171 - Lyric Diction 

MUSC 3320 - Music Teaching in Lower Schools II 

One course sequence selected from: 

MUSC 3340 - Choral and Music Methods in Secondary Schools and 
MUSC 4800 - Advanced Choral Conducting 
or MUSC 3330 - Band Methods and 
MUSC 4810 - Advanced Instrumental Conducting 

D. Related Field Courses 21 hours 

PSYC 1 101 or 110 1H - General Psychology/Honors 

CEUG 1010 - Human Growth and Development 
CEUG 2100 - Teaching and the Exceptional Child 
CEUG 41 10 - Student Teaching P-12 
CEUG 4630 - Classroom Management P-12 



Total Semester Hours 130 hours 

E. Regents' Test, General Education Exit Exam, Teaching Portfolio, Current Certifica- 
tion in CPR/First Aid, Orientation to Teaching or equivalent, Admission to Teacher 
Education including Praxis I, Piano Proficiency Exam, Praxis II Exit Exam, Gradua- 
tion Recital 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 75 



PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN 
EDUCATION IN ART EDUCATION 

A. General Requirements 

Core Areas A, B, C, D and E 42 hours 

AreaF 18 hours 

ARTS 1020 -2D Design 

ARTS 1030 -3D Design 

ARTS 1010 - Drawing I 

ARTS 2710 -Art History I 

CEUG 1010 - Human Growth and Development 

CEUG 2100 - Teaching and the Exceptional Child 

Physical Education 3 hours 

B. Major Field Courses 54 hours 

ARTS 1011 -Drawing II 

ARTS 2720 - Art History II 
ARTS 2011 -Painting I 
ARTS 2012 -Painting II 
ARTS 2040 - Photography 
ARTS 2150 - The Computer in Art 
ARTS 2400 - Introduction to Craft 
ARTS 3300 - Ceramics I 
ARTS 3400 - Printmaking I 
ARTS 3700 - Figure Sculpture 
ARTS 3750 - Contemporary Art and Criticism 
ARTS 4500 - Curriculum and Methods in Art Education 
ARTS 3500 - Art in Elementary Grades 
ARTS 3510 - Art for the Pre- Adolescent and Adolescent 
Any upper division craft class 
Any art elective 

Six semester hours of upper division studio courses from one of the following areas: drawing 
and painting, sculpture, ceramics, crafts, or photography. 

C. Related Field Courses 12 hours 

CEUG 4110** - Student Teaching P-12 

CEUG 4630* - Classroom Management P-12 
*Must be admitted into teacher education to enroll in these courses 
**Must also be admitted into student teaching to enroll in these courses 






Total Semester Hours 129 hours 

D. Regents' Test, Orientation to Teaching or equivalent, Admission to Teacher Educa- 
tion including Praxis I, Education Teaching Portfolio, Admission to Student 
Teaching, Current Certification in CPR/First Aid, Senior Art Show, Senior Art 
Gallery Talk, Praxis II Exit Exam. 

PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF ARTS IN DRAMA/ 
SPEECH 

A. General Requirements 

Core Areas A, B, C, D, and E 42 hours 

AreaF 18 hours 

One course from: 

THEA 1100, 1200,2410 

THEA 2270 (3 semesters) - Theatre Lab 

COMM 2280 - Speech Communication 
Two course sequence in a foreign language beyond 1001 
One course from: 

ARTS 1111, 1270, 2710, 2720, MUSC 1300, 1400, ENGL 2100 
Physical Education 3 hours 



76 ARMSTRONG ATLANTIC STATE UNIVERSITY 



B. Major Field Courses 45 hours 

THEA 3000 - Introduction to Acting 

THEA 3040 - Stagecraft 

THEA 3440 - History of Theatre 

THEA 3460 - Play Directing 

THEA 4950 - Capstone-Senior Thesis/Project (3 sem hours) 

ENGL 3010 - Introduction to Literary Studies 

ENGL 5450 - Shakespeare I or 5460 - Shakespeare II 

Twelve semester hours from: 

THEA 3030 - Creative Dramatics and Children's Theatre 

THEA 3270 - Video Lab 

THEA 3420 - Acting II 

THEA 3450 - History of Theatre II 

THEA 3470 - Theatre Management 

THEA 4000 - Special Topics in Theatre 

THEA 4470 - Stage Managers and Designers Lab 

THEA 4500 - Drama Workshop 

THEA 4510 - Drama Workshop 

THEA 4900 - Independent Study 

THEA 4990 - Internship 
Nine semester hours from: 

ENGL 5450U - Shakespeare I 

ENGL 5460U - Shakespeare II 

ENGL 5560U - British Drama I 

ENGL 5570U - British Drama II 

ENGL 5650U - British, American, and Continental Drama: Ibsen to the Present 

ENGL 5660U - Ancient Epic and Drama 
Three semester hours from: 

FILM 3360, 3400, 3490, 3500, 3510, 5010U, 5020U 

C. Related Field Courses 3 hours 

One additional course in the foreign language sequence (numbered 2002 or above) 

D. Free Electives 12 hours 

Total Semester Hours 123 

E. Regents' Test and Exit Exam 



BIOLOGY 

Faculty 

Kenneth Relyea, Department Head 

Judy Awong-Taylor Ritin Khan 

Ronald Beumer Brett Larson 

Laurent Guillou Thomas Smith 

Linda Hyde Francis Thorne 

Suzanne Kempke Gail Wynn 

General Information 

The Department of Biology offers a bachelor of science degree designed to provide students 
with exposure to traditional and field-oriented biology as well as more modern molecular aspects 
of biology. Students seeking the bachelor's degree in biology, or the bachelor of science degree 
in biology with teacher certification, will receive a firm grounding in biology and physical 
sciences upon which professional careers or additional study can be built. The program is 
appropriate for students seeking careers in wildlife biology, teaching, research, and for pre- 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 77 



medical, pre-dental, and pre-veterinary students. Flexibility in choosing electives in the major is 
helpful to students attempting to meet medical, dental, and veterinary school requirements, and 
the biology major can be obtained while meeting those requirements. By careful choice of 
electives, it is possible to secure double majors (with chemistry, for example). However, 
additional credit hours may be needed to complete double majors. Departmental advisors are 
available to provide information and assistance on all aspects of the bachelor's degree in biology 
and the bachelor' s degree in biology with teacher certification; with the requirements for graduate, 
medical, dental, and veterinary schools; and with career goals. 

Special Programs 

Pre-Medical/Pre-Dental/Pre- Veterinary. Students majoring in biology may concurrently 
complete all pre-medical, pre-dental, and pre-veterinary requirements. 

Pre-Forestry Program with the University of Georgia. Students may complete two years 
of a pre-forestry curriculum at Armstrong Atlantic, then transfer to the University of Georgia. 
After two additional years of course work, students may receive a bachelor of science in forest 
resources. 

Pre-Forestry/Environmental Management Affiliation with Duke University. In this 
program, students may complete three years of study at Armstrong Atlantic and then apply for 
admission to the Duke program. If accepted, students complete two additional years at Duke. 
Upon successfully completing the first year at Duke, students receive the bachelor's degree in 
biology from Armstrong; after successful completion of the second year, students will receive the 
master of science degree in either forestry or environmental management from Duke University. 

Biology Honors. Students performing independent biological research and submitting accept- 
able oral and written reports to a departmental committee may be eligible to have "graduated with 
departmental honors" noted on their official academic records. 

To qualify for this honor, students must have at the time of application: 80- 1 00 semester hours 
of course work; a minimum college grade point average of 3.3; a minimum biology grade point 
average of 3.5 with no grade lower than C; and three or more 3000-4000 level courses completed. 

The committee will consist of three biology faculty members, and may also include a biologist 
from outside the university. The committee will examine student proposals before projects are 
undertaken and will evaluate the completed projects. 

Progress Requirements 

To be eligible for the B.S. degree in biology, students must have a grade of at least C for all 
biology courses applied to the major, and must also take the biology subject test of the Graduate 
Record Exam (GRE) as an exit exam. The minor also requires a C or better in each course. Students 
should be aware that 3000-4000 level biology courses may have prerequisites which could 
increase the total credit hours for the biology minor beyond 18. 

Minors 

Biology 18 hours 

Eighteen semester hours of biology courses of which 9 semester hours must be numbered 3000 
or above 

PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN 
BIOLOGY 

A. General Requirements 

Core Areas A, B, C, D, and E 42 hours 

Biology majors are required to take MATH 1 1 13 in core area A and 
MATH 2200 in core area D 



78 ARMSTRONG ATLANTIC STATE UNIVERSITY 



AreaF 18 hours 

BIOL 1 107 - Principles of Biology I 

BIOL 1 108 - Survey of the Animal Kingdom 

BIOL 2500 - Modern Biology 

CHEM 121 1/121 1L, 1212/1212L - Principles of Chemistry I, II (unless taken to satisfy area 

D, in which case Biology 2010 and 2020 must be substituted) 

Physical Education 3 hours 

B. Major Field Courses 46 hours 

BIOL 2010 - Microbiology (If used to satisfy area F, add a four credit hour 

elective from biology.) 
BIOL 2020 - Plantae and Fungi (If used to satisfy area F, add a four credit hour 

elective from biology.) 
BIOL 3000 - Cell Biology 
BIOL 3010 - Modern Biology Lab 
BIOL 3700 - Genetics 
BIOL 4200 - Vertebrate Physiology 
BIOL 4700 - Ecology 
BIOL 4800 - Seminar 
Total of 22 credit hours from categories 1 -4, with at least one 3 credit hour course chosen from 

each of categories 1-3. 
Category 1: Cell/Molecular/Physiology 

BIOL 3510 - Bacteriology 

BIOL 3520 - Medical Microbiology 

BIOL 3530 - Immunology and Serology 

BIOL 4000 - Cellular Physiology 

BIOL 4090 - Molecular Genetics 

BIOL 4300 - Microbial Physiology 

BIOL 4310 - Applied Microbiology 

BIOL 4400 - Virology 

BIOL 4510 - Principles of Development 
Category 2: Organismal/Ecology 

BIOL 3300 - Entomology 

BIOL 3310 - Invertebrate Zoology 

BIOL 3750 - Natural History of Vertebrates 

BIOL 3770 - Developmental and Comparative Anatomy of Vertebrates 

BIOL 3920 - Parasitology 

BIOL 4010 -Evolution 

BIOL 4320 - Environmental Microbiology 

BIOL 4550 - Marine Organisms 

BIOL 4560 - Physiological Ecology 
Category 3: Botany 

BIOL 3150 -Horticulture 

BIOL 3200 - Flowering Plants 

BIOL 3230 - Anatomy of Seed Plants 

BIOL 4150 - Plant Physiology 

BIOL 4450 - Morphology of Vascular Plants 
Category 4: Others 

BIOL 3400 - Human Physiology 

BIOL 3410 - Nutrition 

BIOL 3580 - Histological Technique 

BIOL 3870 - Animal Histology 

BIOL 4210 - Comparative Physiology 

BIOL 4220 - Endocrinology 

BIOL 49 1 0, -20 - Research I and II (only one research course may be counted as an elective) 

BIOL 4950, -60 - Internship I and II (only one internship may be counted as a major elective) 

BIOL 4970 - Special Topics (with permission of department head) 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 79 



C. Related Field Courses 4-12 hours 

CHEM 2101/2101L - Organic Chemistry I 

Up to 12 credit hours from the following: 
CHEM 2102/2102L - Organic Chemistry II 
CHEM 3300 - Instrumental Analysis 
CHEM 3801 - Biochemistry I 
CHEM 3802 - Biochemistry II 
MATH 1161 -Calculus I 
PHYS 1 1 1 1/1 1 1 1L - Introductory Physics I 
PHYS 1 1 12/1 1 12L - Introductory Physics II 
PHYS 221 1/221 1L - Principles of Physics I 
PHYS 221 2/22 12L - Principles of Physics II 

D. Electives sufficient to make 123 hours 

Students are encouraged to take elective courses which will broaden their educational 
experience. 



Total Semester Hours 123 hours 

E. Regents' Test and Exit Exam 

PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN 
BIOLOGY WITH TEACHER CERTIFICATION 

Students will follow the same program as noted for the biology major with the following 
exceptions: 

The student takes only 4 credit hours from categories 1-4 under major electives. 

The student is allowed only 3 credit hours of free electives. 

The following education courses are required: 

CEUG 1010 - Human Growth and Development 

CEUG 2100 - Teaching and the Exceptional Child 

MGSE 3351 - General Curriculum and Methods 

MGSE 4472 - Science Curriculum and Methods 

MGSE 4630 - Classroom Management 

MGSE 4750 - Student Teaching and Seminar - 9 hours 

PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN 
BIOLOGY (Physical Therapy Emphasis) 

A. General Requirements 

Core Areas A, B, C, D, and E 42 hours 

Physical therapy emphasis majors are required to take MATH 1 1 1 3 in core area A and MATH 
2200 in core area D 

AreaF 18 hours 

BIOL 1 107, 1 108 (unless taken in area D, in which case substitute 

PHYS 111 1/1 1 1 1L, 1112/1112L) 
BIOL 2500 - Modern Biology 
CHEM 1211/121 1L, 1212/1212L - Principles of Chemistry I, II (unless taken to 

satisfy area D, in which case substitute PHYS 1 1 1 1/1 1 1 1L, 1 1 12/1 1 12L - Physics I. II) 
Physical Education 3 hours 

B. Major Field Courses 19 hours 

BIOL 3000 - Cell Biology 

BIOL 3510 -Bacteriology 

BIOL 3770 - Developmental and Comparative Anatomy of Vertebrates 

BIOL 4200 - Vertebrate Physiology 

BIOL 4700 - Ecology 



80 ARMSTRONG ATLANTIC STATE UNIVERSITY 



C. Related Field Courses 17 hours 

CHEM 2101/2101L - Organic Chemistry I 

CSCI 1050 - Computer Concepts and Applications 
HLPR 2000 - Research in the Health Professions 
PHYS 1 1 1 1/1 1 1 1L - Introductory Physics I 
PHYS 1 1 12/1 1 12L - Introductory Physics II 

D. Professional Physical Therapy Program (must be admitted to the professional phase 

of the physical therapy program) 32 hours 

PHTH 5101U - Functional and Structural Aspects of Movement I 

PHTH 5131U - Foundations of Physical Therapy Assessment and Treatment I 

PHTH 5161U - Physical Therapy Practice Issues I 

PHTH 5181U - Clinical Practicum I 

PHTH 5202U - Functional and Structural Aspects of Movement II 

PHTH 5232U - Foundations of Physical Therapy Assessment and Treatment II 

PHTH 5262U - Physical Therapy Practice Issues II 

If students do not choose to continue in the professional physical therapy program once 
admitted, they may count up to 12 semester hours of physical therapy courses as biology 
electives and continue with the biology major. Consult with the department head to ensure that 
essential degree requirements will be met. 



Total Semester Hours 123 hours 

E. Regents' Test and Exit Exam 



CHEMISTRY AND PHYSICS 

Faculty 

Ron Williams, Department Head 

Suzanne Carpenter, Coordinator of Chemistry 

Keith Martin, Coordinator of Engineering Studies 

Sabitra Brush Will Lynch 

Frank Butler Catherine MacGowan 

James Byrd Richard Wallace 

Henry Harris Steven Weiner 

Todd Hizer Morris Whiten 

Leon Jaynes William Zipperer 

Robert Kolodny 

General Information 

The Department of Chemistry and Physics offers bachelor of science degrees with majors in 
chemistry, chemistry with teacher certification, and applied physics. Minor concentrations are 
offered in chemistry, engineering studies, physical sciences, and applied physics. The department 
also sponsors the Engineering Studies Program. This program allows students to complete the first 
two years of a Georgia Tech engineering degree while attending Armstrong Atlantic State 
University. 

The major in chemistry is designed to give depth in the fields of chemistry, yet is flexible 
enough to accommodate a range of career goals, including medical, dental, veterinary and 
pharmacy. The major in applied physics is designed to give a broad foundation in the fields of 
physics and engineering with enough flexibility to support a range of career goals from industrial 
employment to graduate work. 

Departmental advisors are available to provide information and assistance for students 
pursuing the bachelor' s degree with a major in chemistry or applied physics ; the bachelor' s degree 
with a major in chemistry with teacher certification; and for students who are pre-medicine, pre- 
pharmacy, pre-veterinary medicine, pre-dentistry, engineering studies, and engineering transfer 
program majors. 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 81 



Special Programs 

The AASU Engineering Transfer Program. This program offers course work contained in 
the first two years of the standard engineering curriculum at most accredited engineering schools. 
After following the suggested course sequence at Armstrong Atlantic, a student should be able to 
transfer to any engineering school accredited by the Accreditation Board for Engineering and 
Technology (ABET) and complete the requirements for a baccalaureate degree in a chosen 
engineering field in a total of four to five years (the typical duration for all engineering degrees). 
The program of study has been constructed with advice from the Georgia Institute of Technology. 
Students are advised to contact engineering schools of their choice on questions of transfer. 

Dual Degree Program. The department participates in the Dual Degree Program of Armstrong 
Atlantic State University under which students may earn simultaneously the bachelor's degree 
with a major in chemistry or applied physics from Armstrong Atlantic and a baccalaureate degree 
in a field of engineering from the Georgia Institute of Technology or one of several other 
participating schools. 

Pre-Medical/Pre-Dental/Pre-Pharmacy/Pre-Veterinary. Students majoring in chemistry 
may concurrently complete all pre-medical, pre-dental, pre-pharmacy, and pre-veterinary re- 
quirements. 

Progress Requirements 

A grade of C or better in all chemistry courses applied toward the major, and the successful 
completion of the chemistry exit exam are graduation requirements. If any credit for major or 
related field courses is transferred from another college, the department may require that it be 
validated by examination. All minors also require a C or better in each course. 

A grade of C or better in all physics courses applied toward the major and the successful 
completion of the applied physics exit exam are graduation requirements. 

Minors 

Chemistry 15 hours 

Six semester hours of lower division chemistry courses 

Nine semester hours of upper division chemistry courses 
Applied Physics 15 hours 

Six semester hours of lower division physics courses 

Nine semester hours of upper division physics courses 
Engineering Studies 15 hours 

Six semester hours of lower division engineering courses 

ENGR 3100, ENGR 3220 

PHYS3120 
Physical Sciences 15 hours 

Six semester hours in chemistry, physical science, or physics 

Nine semester hours selected from: ASTR 3100, GEOL 3100, METR 3100, OCEA 3100 

PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN 
CHEMISTRY 

A. General Requirements 

Core Areas A, B, C, D, and E 42 hours 

Chemistry majors are required to take MATH 1 1 13 in Core Area A and MATH 1161 

in Core Area D 

Area F 18 hours 

CHEM 121 1, 121 1L/1212, 1212L - Principles of Chemistry I, II (unless taken to 

satisfy Area D, in which case replace with 8 hours of lower division electives) 



82 ARMSTRONG ATLANTIC STATE UNIVERSITY 



Choose one sequence from: 

PHYS 1 1 1 1/1 1 1 1L - Introductory Physics I and 

PHYS 1 1 12/1 1 12L - Introductory Physics II or 

PHYS 221 1/221 1L - Principles of Physics I and 

PHYS 221 2/22 12L - Principles of Physics II 
One hour excess for MATH 1161 from Core Area D 
One hour lower division chemistry 
Physical Education 3 hours 

B. Major Field Courses 38 hours 

CHEM 2101/2101L - Organic Chemistry I 

CHEM 2102/2102L - Organic Chemistry II 
CHEM 2300 - Chemical Analysis 
CHEM 3200/3200L - Inorganic Chemistry 
CHEM 3300 - Instrumental Analysis 
CHEM 3401 - Physical Chemistry I 
CHEM 3402 - Physical Chemistry II 
CHEM 550 1U - Chemistry Seminar I 
CHEM 5502U - Chemistry Seminar II 
Two courses from: 

CHEM 3801 - Biochemistry I 

CHEM 4100 - Advanced Organic Chemistry 

CHEM 4200 - Advanced Inorganic Chemistry 

CHEM 4300 - Advanced Instrumental Analysis 

C. Related Field Course 3 hours 

ENGL 3720 - Business and Technical Communication 

D. Electives 19 hours 

10 hours of upper-division courses from chemistry or other subjects within College 

of Arts and Science 
9 hours of free electives 



Total Semester Hours 123 hours 

E. Regents' Test and Exit Exam 

Proper course selection will allow the student to pursue any one of the following degree 
options. 

Pre-professional/Biochemistry Option: 

B. Major Field Courses 41 hours 

Add CHEM 3801, 3802 - Biochemistry I, II as requirements 

C. Related Field Courses 11 hours 

Add BIOL 1 107 - Principles of Biology I and 

BIOL 1108 - Survey of the Animal Kingdom 

D. Electives 8 hours 

Upper-division courses from chemistry or other subjects within the College 

of Arts and Sciences (7 semester hours) 
Free electives (1 semester hour) 

Pre-Graduate Study Option: 

C. Related Field Courses 14 hours 

Add MATH 2072 - Calculus II and 

MATH 2083 - Calculus III and 

PHYS 3801/3801L - Optics and Modern Physics as requirements 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 83 

D. Electives 8 hours 

Same as pre-professional/biochemistry option 

PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN 
CHEMISTRY WITH TEACHER CERTIFICATION 

Students will follow the same program as noted for the chemistry major with the following 
additional requirements: 

B. Major Field Courses 37 hours 

Add CHEM 3801 - Biochemistry I as a requirement 

C. Related Field Courses 27 hours 

Add the following as requirements: 

CEUG 1010 - Human Growth and Development 

CEUG 2100 - Teaching and the Exceptional Child 

MGSE 335 1 - Secondary School Curriculum and Methods, General 

MGSE 4472 - Secondary School Curriculum and Methods, Science 

MGSE 4630 - Classroom Management 

MGSE 4750 - Student Teaching and Seminar (9 semester hours) 



Total Semester Hours 127 hours 

PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN APPLIED 
PHYSICS 

A. General Requirements 

Core Areas A, B, C, D, and E 42 hours 

Applied physics majors are required to take MATH 1113 in core area A and 

MATH 1161 in core area D 

AreaF 18 hours 

PHYS 221 1/221 1L, 2212/ 2212L - Principles of Physics I, II (unless taken to satisfy 

core area D, in which case replace with 8 hours of lower division electives) 
MATH 2072 - Calculus II 
MATH 2083 - Calculus III 

One hour lower division credit from computer science 
Physical Education 3 hours 

B. Major Field Courses 24 hours 

PHYS 3100 - Electric Circuit Analysis 

PHYS 3 1 20 - Digital Electronics 

PHYS 3210 - Intermediate Mechanics or PHYS 4170 - Advanced Mechanics 

PHYS 3300 - Thermodynamics or PHYS 3400 - Chemical Thermodynamics 

PHYS 3801/3801L - Optics and Modern Physics and Lab 

PHYS 3802 - Intermediate Modern Physics 

PHYS 4120 - Scientific Measurement with Digital Interfacing 

Three semester hours from: 

PHYS 3220 - Mechanics of Deformable Bodies 

PHYS 3230 - Fluid Mechanics 

PHYS 3500 - Diffraction and Crystallography 

PHYS 4900 - Independent Study in Physics 

PHYS 4950 - Special Topics in Physics 

PHYS 4960 - Physics Internship 

C. Related Field Courses 29 hours 

CHEM 121 1/121 1L - Principles of Chemistry I 

CHEM 1212/1212L - Principles of Chemistry II 

CSCI 1301- Introduction to Programming Principles (one hour applies to area F) 

ENGL 3720 - Business and Technical Communication 



84 ARMSTRONG ATLANTIC STATE UNIVERSITY 

ENGR 1 170 - Engineering Graphics 
ENGR 2200 - Statics 
MATH 2160 - Linear Algebra 
MATH 341 1 - Differential Equations 
Three semester hours from: 

MATH 3422 - Differential Equations II 

MATH 3900 - Special Topics in Applied Math 

MATH 4610 - Numerical Analysis 

D. Electives 7 hours 

Upper-division courses (6 semester hours) 

Free elective ( 1 semester hour) 

Total Semester Hours 123 hours 

E. Regents' Test and Exit Exam 

COMPUTER SCIENCE 

Faculty 

Raymond Greenlaw, Department Head 

Alex Bykat Charles Shipley 

Stephen Jodis Laurie White 

Accreditation 

The computer science program is accredited by the Computer Science Accreditation Commis- 
sion (CSAC) of the Computing Sciences Accreditation Board (CSAB), a specialized accrediting 
body recognized by the Council for Higher Education Accreditation (CHE A). 

General Information 

Offering the degree of bachelor of science with a major in computer science, the Department 
of Computer Science also provides several computer literacy courses to satisfy the general 
education needs of Armstrong Atlantic students. Flexibility in the design of the computer science 
major meets the needs of students with many different interests, and a minor can be planned to 
complement other majors. Committed to excellence in both teaching and research, the department 
provides students with an education emphasizing the fundamentals. Our program prepares 
students for employment in a broad range of computer-related jobs in a rapidly changing field. 
Students are also prepared to pursue graduate study in computer science with a broad background 
in basic mathematics and science, and an introduction to computer hardware. Most courses require 
significant use of computers, and upper division classes typically contain fewer than twenty 
students to allow for individual instruction. 

Special Programs 

Students are able to compete for cooperative education positions and internships at major 
Savannah employers such as Gulf stream and Savannah Foods. Such positions provide students 
invaluable opportunities to acquire practical experience to complement classroom experience. 
Students receive credit for participation in such programs. 

Special Requirements 

Computer science includes the study of all aspects of the design, implementation, and 
application of computers. While dealing with general problem solving, emphasis is also given to 
the development of correct and efficient solutions and the expansion of capability to solve ever 
larger and more complex problems. Success in rigorous computer science degree programs 
requires commitment and a strong aptitude for mathematics. 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 85 



Progress Requirements 

To earn the bachelor's degree with a major or a minor in computer science, students must 
complete with a grade of C or better all mathematics and computer science courses required in the 
program of study. To fulfill the prerequisites for any computer science course students must obtain 
a grade of C or better in each prerequisite course. 

Minors 

Computer science 15 hours 

CSCI 1301 
CSCI 1302 
Eleven semester hours from: 

CSCI 2390 

Any 3000-4000 level computer science courses, excluding CSCI 3990, CSCI 5010U, and 

internships 

PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN 
COMPUTER SCIENCE 

A. General Requirements 

Core Areas A, B, C, D, E 42 hours 

Computer science majors are required to take MATH 1 1 13 in core area A and 
MATH 1161 in core area D. 

AreaF 18 hours 

One semester hour excess for MATH 1161 from core area D 

CSCI 1301 - Introduction to Programming Principles 

CSCI 1302 - Advanced Programming Principles 

CSCI 2070 - Ethical Considerations in Computer Science 

CSCI 2620 - Discrete Structures for Computer Science 

CSCI 2390 - Programming in C++ 

MATH 2072 - Calculus II 

Physical Education 3 hours 

B. Major Field Courses 33 hours 

CSCI 3201 - Computer Organization and Architecture I 

CSCI 3202 - Computer Organization and Architecture II 

CSCI 3321 - Software Engineering Concepts 

CSCI 3330 - Comparative Languages 

CSCI 3341 - Operating Systems I 

CSCI 3410 - Algorithms and Data Structure 

CSCI 3450 - Introduction to File Structure 

Two courses in one of the following tracks: 

Application System Development 

CSCI 4322 - Software Engineering Concepts II 

CSCI 4720 - Database Systems 
Computer Systems 

CSCI 4220 - Data Communications and Computer Networks 

CSCI 4342 - Operating Systems Concepts II 
Knowledge-Based Systems 

CSCI 4820 - Introduction to Artificial Intelligence 

CSCI 4880 - Introduction to Knowledge-Based Systems 
Scientific Computing 

CSCI 4210 - Introduction to Parallel Computing 

CSCI 4610 - Numerical Analysis 
Large Software System Development 

CSCI 4322 - Software Engineering Concepts 

CSCI 4350 - Compiler Theory 

CSCI 4390 - Senior Project 

CSCI 4830 - Computer Graphics 



86 ARMSTRONG ATLANTIC STATE UNIVERSITY 



Project Requirement: All computer science majors must take at least one course from 
the Large Software System Development track. 
Six additional semester hours from 4000-level computer science courses. 

C. Related Field Courses 23 hours 

MATH 321 1 - Probability and Mathematical Statistics I 

One of the following: 

MATH 2160 - Linear Algebra 

MATH 3222 - Probability and Mathematical Statistics II 

MATH 3460 - Mathematical Modelling and Optimization 

MATH 4610 - Numerical Analysis 
One of the following CSAB approved science sequences: 

BIOL 1 107 and 1 108 - Biology I, II 

CHEM 121 1/121 1L and 1212/1212L - Principles of Chemistry I, II 

PHYS 221 1/221 1L and 221 2/22 12L - Principles of Physics I, II 

ENGL 3720 - Business and Technical Communication 

At least six additional semester hours from science and engineering major courses. These 
courses must be computer science-approved science sequences; or have computer science 
approved sequences as prerequisites; or be engineering courses having PHYS 2211 as a 
prerequisite. 

D. Free Electives 4 hours 



Total Semester Hours 123 hours 

E. Regents' Test and Exit Exam 

CRIMINAL JUSTICE, SOCIAL AND POLITICAL SCIENCE 

Faculty 

Michael Donahue, Department Head 

Katherine Bennett, Graduate Coordinator 

George Brown Dennis Murphy 

William Daugherty Steve Rhee 

Don Josi Edward Rinalducci 

John Kearnes Daniel Skidmore-Hess 

William Megathlin 

General Information 

The Department of Criminal Justice, Social and Political Science offers three associate degree 
programs in criminal justice, bachelor and master of science degrees in criminal justice, and a 
bachelor of arts in political science, with the opportunity for either teacher certification or a 
concentration in public administration. Students considering graduate school should take the 
foreign language option and continue their linguistic study beyond the first intermediate course. 
Students may pursue associate of applied science degrees in criminal justice with concentrations 
in law enforcement, law enforcement with P.O.S.T. certification, or corrections. 

The department endorses the ideal of liberal education and views it as an enlargement of 
education in related professional areas. As such, all departmental programs and courses are 
conceptually-based so that students will develop the theoretical sophistication to understand and 
manage the practical realities of the field. Instructional effectiveness, public service, and scholarly 
activity are inseparable components of this curricular integrity. The department encourages 
original research by both faculty and students, and supports community service through such 
vehicles as the university's Public Service Center. 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 87 

Special Programs 

Criminal justice programs are also offered in Liberty County; baccalaureate programs in both 
criminal justice and political science are offered at the Brunswick Center at Georgia Coastal 
Community College. The bachelor of science in criminal justice (B. S.C.J.) is available on campus, 
at the Liberty Center, and at the Brunswick Center. In addition, the master of science in criminal 
justice (M. S.C.J.) is offered on campus and at the Liberty Center. 

Progress Requirements 

All department majors are required to take an exit examination (the Area Concentration 
Achievement Test for their respective field) prior to graduation. Majors interested in the associate 
degree with peace officer certification must also contact the Regional Criminal Justice Training 
Center located on campus. All minors also require a C or better in each course. 

Minors 

Criminal Justice 18 hours 

CRJU 1010, CRJU 3210, CRJU 3300, CRJU 3400,CRJU 5500U, and any upper-division 
course in CRJU other than internship 

Legal Studies 18 hours 

POLS 3180, CRJU/POLS 5500U, and any four of the following: 

POLS 3170, POLS 4150, PUBL/POLS 4180, CRJU/POLS 5520U, CRJU 4500, 
or CRJU 4510 

Political Science 15 hours 

Fifteen hours of 3000+ level course work, with at least one course from each of the four areas of 
concentration: 
American Political Institutions: POLS 3170, POLS 3180, POLS 4100, POLS 4110, POLS 

4120, POLS 4150 
International Affairs: POLS 3210, POLS 3260, POLS 4200, POLS 4280, POLS 4290, POLS 

5130U 
Political Theory: POLS 3300, POLS 3310, POLS 3320, POLS 3330, POLS 4300 
Comparative Government: POLS 3420, POLS 3450, POLS 3460, POLS 3480, POLS 3490, 
POLS 4400, POLS 4520 

Public Administration 15 hours 

PUBL 2250, PUBL 4010, PUBL 4030, PUBL 4050, and CRJU 3100 

PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF ASSOCIATE OF APPLIED SCIENCE 
(Concentration in Law Enforcement) 

A. General Requirements: Core Areas 31 hours 

Physical Education 2 hours 

B. Major Field Courses 29 hours 

CRJU 1010 - Introduction to Criminal Justice 

CRJU 1030 - Interpersonal Communication Skills 

CRJU 1200 - Introduction to Law Enforcement 

CRJU 2500 - Criminal Evidence and Procedure 

CRJU 2510 - Introduction to Criminal Law 

CRJU 3210 - Law Enforcement: Structure and Process 

CRJU 5300U - Juvenile Delinquency 

CRJU Electives 

Total Semester Hours 62 hours 

C. Regents' Test and Exit Examination: Area Concentration Achievement Test in 
Criminal Justice for two-year programs 



88 ARMSTRONG ATLANTIC STATE UNIVERSITY 



PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF ASSOCIATE OF APPLIED SCIENCE 
(Concentration in Law Enforcement - P.O.S.T. Option) 

A. General Requirements: Core Areas 31 hours 

Physical Education 2 hours 

B. Major Field Courses 21 hours 

CRJU 1010 - Introduction to Criminal Justice 

CRJU 1030 - Interpersonal Communication Skills 

CRJU 1200 - Introduction to Law Enforcement 

CRJU 2200 - Criminal Investigation 

CRJU 2500 - Criminal Evidence and Procedure 

CRJU 2510 - Introduction to Criminal Law 

CRJU 3210 - Law Enforcement: Structure and Process 

C. Additional Requirements 14 hours 

CRJU 2700 - Directed Readings in Criminal Justice 

CRJU 5130U - Political Terrorism 

CRJU 5300U - Juvenile Delinquency 

ENGL 3720 - Business and Technical Communication 

PEEC 2000 - Community First Aid and CPR 

Total Semester Hours 68 hours 

D. Regents' Test and Exit Examination: Area Concentration Achievement Test in 
Criminal Justice for two-year programs 

PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF ASSOCIATE OF APPLIED SCIENCE 

(Concentration in Corrections) 

A. General Requirements: Core Areas 31 hours 

Physical Education 2 hours 

B. Major Field Courses 29 hours 

CRJU 1010 - Introduction to Criminal Justice 

CRJU 1030 - Interpersonal Communication Skills 

CRJU 2500 - Criminal Evidence and Procedure 

CRJU 3400 - Corrections 

CRJU 3410 - Community-Based Treatment 

CRJU 5300U - Juvenile Delinquency 

CRJU 5500U - Law and Legal Process 

CRJU Electives 



Total Semester Hours 62 hours 

Regents' Exam and Exit Examination: Area Concentration Achievement Test in 
Criminal Justice for two-year programs 

PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN 
CRIMINAL JUSTICE 

A. General Requirements 

Core Areas A, B, C, D, and E 42 hours 

Area F 18 hours 

CRJU 1010 - Introduction to Criminal Justice 
CRJU 1030 - Interpersonal Communication Skills 
CRJU 2100 - Criminology 
CRJU 2500 - Criminal Evidence and Procedure 
CRJU 2510 - Introduction to Criminal Law 
MATH 2200 - Elementary Statistics 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 89 



Physical Education 3 hours 

B. Major Field Courses 27 hours 

CRJU 3100 - Research Methods 

CRJU 3210 - Law Enforcement: Structure and Process 
CRJU 3400 - Corrections 
CRJU 4800 - Internship (twelve semester hours) 
CRJU 5300U - Juvenile Delinquency 
CRJU 5500U - Law and Legal Process 

Capstone course: CRJU 4900 - Directed Research in Criminal Justice or 
CRJU 4910 - Seminar in Criminal Justice 

C. Related Field Courses 6 hours 

PUBL/POLS 2601 - Foundations of Public Administration 

SOCI 1 101 - Introductory Sociology or PSYC 1 101 - General Psychology 

D. Approved electives 12 hours 

9 hours of approved electives at the 3000+ level 

E. Free Electives 15 hours 



Total Semester Hours 123 hours 

F. Regents' Test and Exit Exam: Area Concentration Achievement Test in Criminal 
Justice for four-year programs 

PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF ARTS IN POLITICAL 
SCIENCE 

A. General Requirements 

Core Areas A, B, C, D, and E 42 hours 

AreaF 18 hours 

POLS 2100 - Introduction to Political Science 

PHIL 2201 - Introduction to Philosophy or SOCI 1 101 - Introductory Sociology 

One of the following: 

POLS 2201 - State and Local Government 

POLS 2290 - Foundations of International Relations 

PUBL/POLS 2601 - Foundations of Public Administration 

MATH 2200 - Elementary Statistics 
One course selected from: 

ANTH 1 102 - Introduction to Anthropology 

ECON 2106 - Microeconomics 

GEOG 2120 - Cultural Geography 

HIST 11 12 -Civilization II 
Six hours of a foreign language sequence numbered 1 002 or above or six hours of a computer 

language 
Physical Education 3 hours 

B. Major Field Courses 37 hours 

POLS/PUBL 2150 - Careers in Political Science and Public Administration 

Six courses (18 semester hours) from the following with at least one course from each area: 
American Political Institutions 

POLS 3170 - Constitutional Law and the Federal System 

POLS 3180 - Constitutional Civil Liberties 

PUBL/POLS 3990 - Special Topics in Public Administration/Political Science 

PUBL/POLS 4010 - Politics of Budgetary Process 

POLS 4100 - Independent Study in American Government 

PUBL/POLS 4030 - Public Policy Development 

PUBL/POLS 4050 - Principles of Public Management 

POLS 4100 - Independent Study in American Government 

POLS 4120 - Congress and Political Parties 



90 ARMSTRONG ATLANTIC STATE UNIVERSITY 



POLS 4150 - American Supreme Court 

POLS 4180 - Administrative Law 

POLS 5120U - Congress and Political Parties 

CRJU/POLS 5500U - Law and Legal Process 

CRJU 3100 - Research Methods 
Political Theory 

POLS 3300 - Political Philosophy: Ancient and Medieval 

POLS 3310 - Modern Political Philosophy 

POLS 3320 - American Political Thought 

POLS 3330 - Contemporary Political Thought 
International Relations 

POLS 3210 - International Relations: East Asia 

POLS 3260 - International Law 

POLS 4200 - Independent Study in International Relations 

POLS 4290 - American Foreign Policy 

POLS 5280U - Seminar in Global Politics 

CRJU/POLS 5130U - Political Terrorism 
Comparative Politics 

POLS 3420 - Politics of Underdevelopment: Africa and Latin America 

POLS 3460 - Government of East Asia 

POLS 3480 - Governments of Western Europe 

POLS 3490 - Political Transformation of the Former Soviet Union 

POLS 4400 - Independent Study in Comparative Government 

CRJU/POLS 5520U - Comparative Judicial Systems 
15 hours of political science electives 
Capstone course: POLS 4950 - Seminar in Political Science 

C. Electives 23 hours 

Including a minimum of 15 hours of upper division courses 



Total Semester Hours 123 hours 

E. Regents' Exam and Exit Exam: Area Concentration Achievement Test in Political 
Science 

PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF ARTS IN POLITICAL 
SCIENCE (Public Administration) 

A. General Requirements 

Core Areas A, B, C, D, and E 42 hours 

AreaF 18 hours 

POLS 2100 - Introduction to Political Science 

MATH 2200 - Elementary Statistics 

Foreign language - six hours above 1001 or six hours of computer language 

One of the following: 

POLS 2201 - State and Local Government 

PUBL/POLS 2601 - Foundations of Public Administration 
One course selected from: 

ANTH 1 102 - Introduction to Anthropology 

ECON 2106 - Microeconomics 

GEOG 2120 - Cultural Geography 

HIST 11 12 -Civilization II 

PHIL 2201 - Introduction to Philosophy 

SOCI 1101 - Introductory Sociology 
Physical Education 3 hours 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 91 



B. Major Field Courses 31 hours 

POLS/PUBL 2150 - Careers in Political Science and Public Administration 
POLS/PUBL 4010 - Politics in Budgetary Process 

POLS/PUBL 4030 - Public Policy Development 

POLS/PUBL 4050 - Principles of Public Management 

POLS/PUBL 4180 - Administrative Law 

POLS 4950 - Seminar in Political Science 

Fifteen (15) elective upper division hours in POLS/PUBL with at least three (3) 

credits in each of the following four areas: 
American Political Institutions 

POLS 3170 - Constitutional Law and the Federal System 

POLS 3180 - Constitutional Civil Liberties 

PUBL/POLS 3990 - Special Topics in Public Administration/Political Science 

PUBL/POLS 4010 - Politics of Budgetary Process 

POLS 4100 - Independent Study in American Government 

PUBL/POLS 4030 - Public Policy Development 

PUBL/POLS 4050 - Principles of Public Management 

POLS 4100 - Independent Study in American Government 

POLS 4120 - Congress and Political Parties 

POLS 4150 - American Supreme Court 

POLS 4180 - Administrative Law 

POLS 5120U - Congress and Political Parties 

CRJU/POLS 5500U - Law and Legal Process 

CRJU 3100 - Research Methods 
Political Theory 

POLS 3300 - Political Philosophy: Ancient and Medieval 

POLS 3310 - Modern Political Philosophy 

POLS 3320 - American Political Thought 

POLS 3330 - Contemporary Political Thought 
International Relations 

POLS 3210 - International Relations: East Asia 

POLS 3260 - International Law 

POLS 4200 - Independent Study in International Relations 

POLS 4290 - American Foreign Policy 

POLS 5280U - Seminar in Global Politics 

CRJU/POLS 5130U - Political Terrorism 
Comparative Politics 

POLS 3420 - Politics of Underdevelopment: Africa and Latin America 

POLS 3460 - Government of East Asia 

POLS 3480 - Governments of Western Europe 

POLS 3490 - Political Transformation of the Former Soviet Union 

POLS 4400 - Independent Study in Comparative Government 

CRJU/POLS 5520U - Comparative Judicial Systems 

C. Related Field Course 3 hours 

CRJU 3100 - Research Methods 

D. Electives 26 hours 

Includes a minimum of 15 hours of upper division courses 



Total Semester Hours 123 hours 

E. Regents' Test and Exit Exam: Area of Concentration Achievement Test in Political 
Science 



92 ARMSTRONG ATLANTIC STATE UNIVERSITY 



PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF ARTS IN POLITICAL 
SCIENCE WITH TEACHER CERTIFICATION 

A. General Requirements 

Core Areas A, B, C, D, and E 42 hours 

AreaF 18 hours 

POLS 2100 - Introduction to Political Science 

MATH 2200 - Elementary Statistics 

Foreign language - six hours 1002 or above, or six hours of computer language 

One of the following: 

POLS 2201 - State and Local Government 

POLS 2290 - Foundations of International Relations 
One course selected from: 

ANTH 1 102 - Introduction to Anthropology 

ECON 2106 - Microeconomics 

GEOG 2120 - Cultural Geography 

HIST 11 12 -Civilization II 

PHIL 2201 - Introduction to Philosophy 

SOCI 1101 - Introductory Sociology 
Physical Education 3 hours 

B. Major Field Courses 21 hours 

Six courses from the four areas below with at least one course from each area: 
American Political Institutions 

POLS 3170 - Constitutional Law and the Federal System 

POLS 3180 - Constitutional Civil Liberties 

PUBL/POLS 4010 - Politics of Budgetary Process 

PUBL/POLS 4030 - Public Policy Development 

PUBL/POLS 4050 - Principles of Public Management 

POLS 4100 - Independent Study in American Government 

POLS 41 10 - American Presidency 

POLS 4120 - Congress and Political Parties 

POLS 4150 - American Supreme Court 

POLS 4180 - Administrative Law 

POLS 5120U - Congress and Political Parties 
Political Theory 

POLS 3300 - Political Philosophy: Ancient and Medieval 

POLS 3310 - Modern Political Philosophy 

POLS 3320 - American Political Thought 

POLS 3330 - Contemporary Political Thought 
International Relations 

POLS 3210 - International Relations: East Asia 

POLS 3260 - International Law 

POLS 4200 - Independent Study in International Relations 

POLS 4280 - Seminar in Global Politics 

POLS 4290 - American Foreign Policy 

POLS 5280U - Seminar in Global Politics 

CRJU/POLS 5130U - Political Terrorism 
Comparative Politics 

POLS 3420 - Politics of Underdevelopment: Africa and Latin America 

POLS 3460 - Government of East Asia 

POLS 3480 - Governments of Western Europe 

POLS 3490 - Political Transformation of the Former Soviet Union 

POLS 4400 - Independent Study in Comparative Government 

POLS 4520 - Comparative Judicial Systems 

Capstone course: POLS 4950 - Seminar in Political Science 






COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 93 



C. Related Field Courses 33 hours 

CEUG 1010 - Human Growth and Development 

CEUG 2100 - Teaching and the Exceptional Child 

MGSE 3351 - Secondary School Curriculum and Methods, General 

MGSE 4492 - Secondary School Curriculum and Methods, Social Science 

MGSE 4630 - Classroom Management 

MGSE 4750 - Student Teaching and Seminar (9 semester hours) 

Two upper division courses from an approved social science related field 

One course from: (or an approved elective if taken in areas B or E) 

HIST 1111 - Civilization I 

HIST 1 1 12/1 1 12H - Civilization II/Honors 

HIST 21 1 1 - History of America to 1877 

HIST 2112 - History of America since 1865 

D. Electives 6 hours 



Total Semester Hours 123 hours 

E. Regents' Test and Exit Exam 

ECONOMICS 

Faculty 

Chris Paul, Department Head 
Richard McGrath 
Yassaman Saadatmand 
Michael Toma 

General Information 

The Department of Economics offers the degree of bachelor of arts with a major in economics, 
as well as a minor in economics. The program is consistent with the liberal arts tradition, requiring 
a foundation in economic theory along with applied courses from various areas. These areas 
include international economics, financial markets, public policy issues, regional and interna- 
tional development, and quantitative applications. Graduates may find positions in business, 
government, and consulting, ranging from management and marketing to research and analysis. 
Opportunities exist for internship and research experience. 

Special Programs 

An honors program in economics is available. 

Progress Requirements 

Students must earn a grade of C or better in every course required for the major or minor. 

Minors 

Economics 15 hours 

ECON 2105 or 2106 

Twelve credit hours selected from: ECON 3100, 3200, 3300, 3400, 3500, 3630, 4210. 
4310, 4400, 4410, 4450, 4500, and 4010-4030. 



94 ARMSTRONG ATLANTIC STATE UNIVERSITY 



PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF ARTS IN ECONOMICS 

A. General Requirements 

Core Areas A, B, C, D, and E 42 hours 

AreaF 18 hours 

ECON 2105 - Principles of Macroeconomics 

ECON 2106 - Principles of Microeconomics 

MATH 2220 - Elementary Statistics 

MATH 1950 - Applied Math or MATH 1 161 - Calculus I 

Two-course sequence of foreign language above 1001 

Physical Education 3 hours 

B. Major Field Courses 36 hours 

ECON 3050 - Intermediate Macroeconomics 

ECON 3060 - Intermediate Microeconomics 

ECON 2030 - Accounting I 

ECON 2040 - Accounting II 

Eight courses from at least three of the following categories: 

International 

ECON 3100 - Multinational Economic Enterprises 

ECON 3200 - International Trade 

ECON 4310 - International Financial Institutions 

ECON 4400 - Seminar in Third World Economic Development 

ECON 4450 - Comparative Economic Systems 
Quantitative 

ECON 3600 - Mathematical Economics 

ECON 3700 - Econometrics 
Applied 

ECON 3300 - Money and Banking 

ECON 3400 - Economics of Labor 

ECON 3500 - Managerial Economics 
Public Policy and Economic History 

ECON 3630 - Economic History in the US 

ECON 4210 - International Law of Expropriation and Compensation 

ECON 4410 - Regional Economics 

ECON 4500 - Public Finance 
Internships and Specialized Courses 

ECON 4520, -30, -40 - Internship (with permission of department head) 

ECON 4010, -20, -30 - Special Topics (with permission of department head) 

C. Related Field Courses 9 hours 

CSCI 1050 - Introduction to Computer Concepts 

Two upper division courses (3000 or 4000 level) from the following: 
psychology, anthropology, political science, geography, 
philosophy, mathematics, or sociology 

D. Electives 15 hours 

One upper division 3000+ course and four other electives. 



Total Semester Hours 123 hours 

E. Regents' Test and Exit Exam 






COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 95 



HISTORY 

Faculty 

Nancy White, Department Head 
Christopher Hendricks, Graduate Coordinator 

Olavi Arens Michael Price 

Barbara Fertig George Pruden 

Mark Finlay Howard Robinson 

David Gleeson Janet Stone 

Michael Hall James Todesca 

June Hopkins Anne Yentsch 
Thomas Howard 

General Information 

The Department of History offers the degree of bachelor of arts with a major in history, or a 
major in history with broad field teacher certification. The latter prepares graduates to teach at the 
secondary level in both public and private schools. The former prepares graduates for entry level 
employment in such areas as government, public or community service, and business, as well as 
for pursuit of graduate study in history and other professional programs (law or business). The 
curriculum in public history prepares graduates for masters programs as well as entry level 
employment in the non-profit sector and various cultural resource enterprises. Minor concentra- 
tions in history offer students the opportunity to strengthen their research and writing skills and 
to better understand the development and functioning of modern society. 

Special Programs 

Honors. See the course description for HIST 4990 - Senior Thesis in History for detailed 
information. Also see University Honors Program. 

Brunswick Center. The bachelor's in history is offered in the evenings at the Brunswick 
Center (Georgia Coastal Community College) - except for HIST 4500, HIST 4960 and 4970, and 
the seminar courses. These requirements must be completed on campus. The bachelor of general 
studies with a history concentration is also available. 

Special Requirements 

Students who major in history are required to complete six semester hours of a foreign 
language sequence, or demonstrate proficiency in a foreign language offered by the university 
through the first intermediate course. Students should begin their language sequence as soon as 
possible and certainly not later than their junior year. Students should plan their programs of study 
carefully in consultation with a faculty advisor. Students who change majors or transfer may find 
it necessary to enroll beyond the traditional eight semesters if the degree requirements including 
foreign language cannot be fulfilled within that time. 

In addition to meeting minimum requirements for either degree, students contemplating 
graduate work in history are strongly advised to continue foreign language study beyond the 200 1 
level. Students with an additional double major in which computer science is a language choice 
may substitute computer science for a foreign language in history. 

Both degree programs require HIST 4500 (Methods), HIST 4900, 4910, 4920. or 4930 
(Seminar), and HIST 4960 or 4970 (Historiography). In choosing the remainder of their advanced 
courses students may choose to concentrate in one particular area of history (e.g. European. 
American, or non-western), providing they complete at least six hours outside that area. 

Progress Requirements 

Completion of the major requires students to complete the major field courses with a grade of 
C or better. All minors also require a C or better in each course. 



96 ARMSTRONG ATLANTIC STATE UNIVERSITY 



Minors 

History 15 hours 

Fifteen hours of 3000, 4000, or 5000U level history courses 
Historical Archaeology 15 hours 

HIST/PBHS/ANTH 3820, 5720U, 5740U 

Six hours from the following: 

HIST 3760, 3710, 4500, 5510U, 5560U, 5570U 
International Studies 15 hours 

Consult history and/or government departments for program of study. 
Public History 15 hours 

HIST 4500 

PBHS 4980 

Nine hours from the following: 

PBHS 3800, 3820, 5810U, 5830U, 5850U, 5750U 
Russian Studies 15 hours 

Consult the departments of history and/or criminal justice, social and political 
science for program of study. 

PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF ARTS IN HISTORY 

A. General Requirements 

Core Areas A, B, C, D, and E 42 hours 

Area F 18 hours 

HIST 1 1 1 1 - Civilization I or HIST 1 1 12/H - Civilization II/Honors (If taken to 

satisfy core area B or E, substitute an approved global perspectives course.) 
HIST 21 1 1 - History of America to 1877 (If taken to satisfy core area E, substitute 

a humanities or social science course at the 1000 or 2000 level.) 
HIST 21 12 - History of America since 1865 (If taken to satisfy core area E, 

substitute a humanities or social science course at the 1000 or 2000 level.) 
Foreign Language 1002 - Elementary Language II 
Foreign Language 2001 - Intermediate Language I 
One course selected from: 

MATH 1113-Pre-calculus 

MATH 1161 -Calculus 

MATH 2200 - Elementary Statistics 

MATH 2900 - Spirit and Structure of Math 

CSCI 1050 - Introduction to Computer Concepts and Applications 

(If a math or computer science course is taken to satisfy area D, a humanities or social 

sciences course may be substituted.) 
Physical Education 3 hours 

B. Major Field Courses 27 hours 

HIST 4500 - Historical Methods 

One course from: 

HIST 4900 - Non- Western History Seminar 

HIST 4910 - Russian History Seminar 

HIST 4920 - European History Seminar 

HIST 4930 - American History Seminar 
One course from: 

HIST 4960 - American Historiography 

HIST 4970 - European Historiography 
Six other history courses at the 3000 level or above 

C. Related Field Courses 18 hours 

One public history course (3000 or above) 

Six semester hours chosen from the social sciences and/or the humanities excluding 
history (upper or lower division). 






COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 97 



At least nine semester hours at the 3000 level or above chosen from the social 
sciences, and/or the humanities, and/or public history. 
D. Electives 15 hours 



Total Semester Hours 123 hours 

E. Regents' Test and Exit Exam 

PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF ARTS IN HISTORY 
WITH TEACHER CERTIFICATION 

A. General Requirements 

Core Areas A, B, C, D, and E 42 hours 

AreaF 18 hours 

HIST 1 1 1 1 - Civilization I or HIST 1 1 12/H - Civilization II/Honors (If taken to 

satisfy core area B or E, substitute an approved global perspectives course.) 
HIST 2 1 1 1 - History of America to 1 877 or HIST 2 1 1 2 - History of America since 

1 865 (If taken to satisfy core area E, substitute a social science course at the 1 000 or 2000 level.) 
Foreign Language 1002 - Elementary Language II 
Foreign Language 2001 - Intermediate Language I 
Math 2200 - Elementary Statistics (If taken to satisfy core area D, substitute an approved social 

science course). 
CEUG 1010 - Human Growth and Development 
Physical Education 3 hours 

B. Major Field Courses 27 hours 

One course selected from: (as determined by whether HIST 2 1 1 1 or HIST 2 1 1 2 is taken above) 

HIST 3710 - Colonial and Revolutionary America 

HIST 3770 - U. S. History 1917-1960 

HIST 4500 - Historical Methods 
One course selected from: 

HIST 4900 - Non-Western History Seminar 

HIST 4910 - Russian History Seminar 

HIST 4920 - European History Seminar 

HIST 4930 - American History Seminar 
One course from: 

HIST 4960 - American Historiography 

HIST 4970 - European Historiography 
One approved American history course 
Two approved European history courses 
Two approved non-western history courses 

C. Related Field Courses 33 hours 

One course selected from: 

ECON 3100 - Multinational Economics Enterprises 

ECON 3200 - International Trade 

ECON 4310 - International Financial Institutions 

ECON 4450 - Comparative Economics Systems 
One course selected from: 

GEOG 1 1 1 1 - Physical Geography 

GEOG 2120 - Cultural Geography 

CEUG 2100 - Teaching and the Exceptional Child 

MGSE 3351 - Secondary School Curriculum and Methods, General 

MGSE 4492 - Secondary School Curriculum and Methods, Social Science 

MGSE 4630 - Classroom Management 

MGSE 4750 - Student Teaching and Seminar (9 semester hours) 
Two approved social science courses 



Total Semester Hours 123 hours 

E. Regents' Test, General Education Exit Exam, and Major Field Exit Exam 



98 ARMSTRONG ATLANTIC STATE UNIVERSITY 



LANGUAGES, LITERATURE, AND PHILOSOPHY 

Faculty 

Robert Parham, Department Head 

Carol Andrews William Martin 

Christopher Baker David Noble 

Ellen Blossman Erik Nordenhaug 

Rick Canning Richard Nordquist 

Frank Clancy Helon Raines 

Thomas Cooksey Deborah Reese 

Isabel Cottrell Leslie Sconduto 

William Deaver James Smith 

Gary Holcomb Dabney Townsend 

Karen Hollinger John Welsh 

Carol Jamison Teresa Winterhalter 

General Information 

The Department of Languages, Literature, and Philosophy offers the degree of bachelor of arts 
with majors in English, English with teacher certification, English (Communications), Spanish, 
and Spanish with teacher certification. Minors are available in English, philosophy, linguistics, 
film and foreign languages. In addition, the department provides the composition, literature, and 
philosophy courses required by the core curriculum. Students majoring in English should satisfy 
core curriculum requirements for the bachelor of arts degree during the freshman and sophomore 
years. 

English Composition Core. Students should begin the required English core sequence in their 
initial semester of attendance, and must not delay beginning this sequence beyond their second 
semester of attendance. Students must enroll in the appropriate course in the core sequence and 
do so every semester until they complete the sequence and pass the Regents' Test. ENGL 1 101, 
1 1 02, and 2 1 00 courses may not be dropped without permission of the department head. Students 
who drop these courses without department head approval will receive failing grades in the class. 

Exemptions from Core English. Students who wish credit exemption for ENGL 1101 must 
pass the CLEP Freshman College Composition (with Essay) examination with a score of 49 (grade 
equivalent of a B) as well as pass the essay portion of the test. Students who wish a credit 
exemption for ENGL 1102 must take the CLEP Analysis and Interpretation of Literature and 
Essay examination, make a score of at least 55 (grade equivalent of B), and pass the essay portion 
of the test. Students who score a '3' or higher on the AP exam (English: Language and 
Composition or Literature and Composition), or who win an NCTE Writing Award, will have their 
ENGL 1101 requirement waived and will automatically gain entrance into ENGL 1 102H. These 
students are strongly urged to complete their remaining graduation hours by subsequently 
enrolling in ENGL 2100H and an upper-level writing class such as ENGL 3720 (Technical and 
Business Communication) or ENGL 4700 (Advanced Composition). 

English Composition Transfer Credit. Transfer students from outside the University System 
of Georgia who have not yet completed the required English composition (ENGL 1101, 1 102) 
should arrange a placement interview through the departmental office. The interviewer will 
evaluate student transcripts for English credits, administer the English placement test (if 
necessary), provide information on the composition sequence and the Georgia Regents' Test, and 
determine placement in the appropriate composition course. 

Foreign Languages. College preparatory curriculum (CPC) deficiency in foreign languages 
may be fulfilled by successfully completing any of the 1000-level courses in Spanish, French, 
Latin, or German with a final course grade of C or better. Students who take their foreign language 
courses on another campus while enrolled at Armstrong Atlantic must pass an appropriate national 
standardized test with a score not lower than the 60th percentile on each part to receive credit for 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 99 



foreign language 1002 and/or 2001. Students may receive credit by examination for French, 
German, and Spanish provided they meet requirements listed under Credit by Examination in the 
section on Admissions. For further information students should contact the department head or the 
director of the counseling and placement office. 

Progress Requirements 

Students must earn a grade of C or better in each upper-level course included in any major or 
minor area. A minor must contain 1 5 to 1 8 semester hours of course work with at least 9 hours of 
upper division course work. Courses taken to satisfy core areas A through E may not be counted 
as course work in the minor. 

Minors 

English 15-18 hours 

Must include 9 hours of English electives numbered 3000 or above (maximum of 3 hours of 

4990) 
Film 15-18 hours 

Must include THEA/FILM 3400, THEA/FILM 3510, THEA/FILM 3500, 
THEA/FILM 5010U 
Foreign Languages 15-18 hours 

Must include 9 hours of language electives numbered 3000 or above 
Linguistics 15-18 hours 

Must include ENGL 3010, LING 4700, LING 5000U, LING 5800U, LING 5820U 
Philosophy 15-18 hours 

Must include 9 hours of philosophy electives numbered 3000 or above 

PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF ARTS IN ENGLISH 

A. General Requirements 

Core Areas A, B, C, D, and E 42 hours 

AreaF 18 hours 

ENGL 2100 - Literature and Humanities (unless taken in area C) 
One course selected from: 

ENGL 21 1 1 - World Literature I 

ENGL 21 12 - World Literature II 
One course (two if ENGL 2100 is taken in area C) selected from: 

ENGL 2121 - British Literature I 

ENGL 2122 - British Literature II 

ENGL 2131 - American Literature I 

ENGL 2132 - American Literature II 
Foreign Language 1002 - Elementary Language II 
Foreign Language 2001 - Intermediate Language 
COMM 2280 - Speech Communication 
Physical Education 3 hours 

B. Major Field Courses 39 hours 

ENGL 3010 - Literary Studies 

One course selected from: 

ENGL 2121 - British Literature I 
ENGL 2122 - British Literature II 
ENGL 21 1 1 - World Literature I 
ENGL 21 12 - World Literature II 
ENGL 2 1 3 1 - American Literature I 
ENGL 2132 - American Literature II 



100 ARMSTRONG ATLANTIC STATE UNIVERSITY 



Two courses selected from: 

ENGL 5440U - Early English Literature 

ENGL 5450U OR 5460U - Shakespeare I or II 

ENGL 5470U - British Poetry and Prose: 1603-1689 

ENGL 5500U - 18th Century British Poetry and Prose 

ENGL 5520U - 19th Century British Romantic Poetry and Prose I 
Two courses selected from: 

ENGL 5200U - Postcolonial Literature 

ENGL 5380U - Southern Literature 

ENGL 5350U - African American Literature 

ENGL 5530U - 19th Century British Victorian Poetry and Prose II 

ENGL 5540U - Modernism 

ENGL 5550U - Contemporary Literature 
Two courses selected from: 

ENGL 5360U - American Novel 

ENGL 5370U - American Poetry 

ENGL 5400U - British Poetry 

ENGL 5410U - British Novel 

ENGL 5560U - British Drama: Beginning to 1630 

ENGL 5570U - British Drama: 1630-1800 

ENGL 5650U - British, American, and Continental Drama 

ENGL 5660U - Ancient Epic and Drama 

FILM/THEA 3510 - Film and Literature 
Two courses selected from: 

ENGL 3720 - Business and Technical Communications 

ENGL 4700 - Advanced Composition 

ENGL 4740 - Creative Writing (Poetry) 

ENGL 4750 - Creative Writing (Fiction) 

ENGL 5760U - Literary Nonfiction 

ENGL 5800U - Advanced Grammar 

ENGL 5820U - History of the English Language 
One course selected from: 

ENGL 5730U - Rhetoric 

ENGL 5830U - History of Criticism 

ENGL 5840U - Literary Theory 

FILM/COMM 3360 - Critical Approaches to Mass Culture 

ENGL 5990U - Capstone Seminar 

C. Related Field Courses 3 hours 

Foreign Language 2002 - Intermediate Language II 

D. Electives 18 hours 



Total Semester Hours 123 hours 

E. Regents' Test and Exit Exam 

PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF ARTS IN ENGLISH 
WITH TEACHER CERTIFICATION 

A. General Requirements 

Core Areas A, B, C, D, and E 42 hours 

AreaF 18 hours 

ENGL 2100 - Literature and Humanities (unless taken in area C) 

CEUG 1010 - Human Growth and Development 

CEUG 2100 - Teaching and the Exceptional Child 

Foreign Language 1002 - Elementary Language II 

Foreign Language 2001 - Intermediate Language 

COMM 2280 - Speech Communication 

Physical Education 3 hours 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 101 



B. Major Field Courses 36 hours 

ENGL 3010 - Literary Studies 

ENGL 3020 - Composition Studies 
Five courses selected from: 

ENGL 21 1 1 - World Literature I 

ENGL 21 12 - World Literature II 

ENGL 2121 - British Literature I 

ENGL 2122 - British Literature II 

ENGL 2131 - American Literature 

ENGL 2132 - American Literature II 
One course selected from: 

ENGL 5400U - British Poetry 

ENGL 5410U - British Novel 

ENGL 5440U - Early English Literature 

ENGL 5450U or 5460U - Shakespeare I or II 

ENGL 5470U - 17th Century British Poetry and Prose 

ENGL 5500U - 18th Century British Poetry and Prose 

ENGL 5520U - 19th Century British Poetry and Prose I 

ENGL 5530U - 19th Century British Poetry and Prose II 

ENGL 5560U - British Drama I or ENGL 5570U - British Drama II 
One course selected from: 

ENGL 5350U - African American Literature 

ENGL 5360U - American Novel 

ENGL 5370U - American Poetry 

ENGL 5380U - Southern Literature 

ENGL 5540U - Modernism 
One course selected from: 

ENGL 5800U - Advanced Grammar 

ENGL 5820U - History of the English Language 
Two courses selected from: 

Any upper division English course 

MGSE 4180 - Young Adult Literature 

C. Related Field Courses 24 hours 

Foreign Language 2002 - Intermediate Language II 

MGSE 3351 - Secondary School Curriculum and Methods 

MGSE 4280 - Teaching Literacy 

MGSE 4392 - Secondary School Curriculum and Methods, English 

MGSE 4630 - Classroom Management 

MGSE 4750 - Student Teaching and Seminar (9 semester hours) 



Total Semester Hours 123 hours 

E. Regents' Test and Exit Exam 

PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF ARTS IN ENGLISH 
(Communications) 

A. General Requirements 

Core Areas A, B, C, D, and E 42 hours 

AreaF 18 hours 

ENGL 2100 - Literature and Humanities (unless taken in area C) 
One course selected from: 

ENGL 21 1 1 - World Literature I 

ENGL 21 12 - World Literature II 



102 ARMSTRONG ATLANTIC STATE UNIVERSITY 



One course (two if ENGL 2100 is taken in area C) selected from: 

ENGL 2121 - British Literature I 

ENGL 2122 - British Literature II 

ENGL 2131 - American Literature I 

ENGL 2132 - American Literature II 
Foreign Language 1002 - Elementary Language II 
Foreign Language 2001 - Intermediate Language I 
COMM 2210 - Speech Communication 
Physical Education 3 hours 

B. Major Field Courses 21 hours 

ENGL 3720 - Technical and Business Writing 

ENGL 3010 - Introduction to Literary Studies 

ENGL 4700 - Advanced Composition 

ENGL 5730U - Rhetoric 

ENGL 4990 - Internship (3 semester hours) 

Two additional literature courses, 3000 level or above 

C. Related Field Courses 27 hours 

Foreign Language 2002 

PHIL 2201 - Introduction to Philosophy or PHIL 2251 - Introduction to Ethics 

THEA 2410 - Oral Interpretation 

JOUR 3430 - Journalistic Writing and Editing 

COMM 3360 - Critical Approaches to Mass Culture 

One of the following options: 

Professional Writing 

COMM 3060 - Public Relations 
JOUR 3270 - Journalism Lab 
ENGL 5760U - Literary Nonfiction 
JOUR 4000 - Topics in Journalism 
Communications 

COMM 3050 - Interpersonal and Small Group Communication 

COMM 3060 - Public Relations 

JOUR 3270 - Journalism Lab (1-3 hours) 

One course selected from: 

FILM/THEA 3400 - History of Film 
FILM/THEA 3490 - Television Theory and Criticism 
FILM/THEA 3500 - Introduction to Film 
FILM/THEA 3510 - Film and Literature 
FILM/THEA 5010U - Topics in Film 
Film and Television Studies 
Four courses selected from: 

FILM/THEA 3400 - History of Film 
FILM/THEA 3490 - Television Theory and Criticism 
FILM/THEA 3500 - Introduction to Film 
FILM/THEA 3510 - Film and Literature 
FILM/THEA 5010U - Topics in Film 
FILM/THEA 5020U - Film Theory and Criticism 

D. Elective Hours 12 hours 



Total Semester Hours 123 hours 

E. Regents' Test and Exit Exam 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 103 



PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF ARTS IN SPANISH 

A. General Requirements 

Core Areas A, B, C, D, and E 42 hours 

Area F 18 hours 

SPAN 1002 - Spanish II 

SPAN 2001 - Intermediate Spanish I 

SPAN 2002 - Intermediate Spanish II 

ENGL 2 100 - Literature and Humanities (if taken in Area C, replace with elective at 1 000-2000 level) 

Six semester hours of electives at the 1000-2000 level 

Physical Education 3 hours 

B. Major Field Courses 30 hours 

Four to six courses selected from: 

SPAN 3031 - Spanish Conversation and Composition I 

SPAN 3032 - Spanish Conversation and Composition II 

SPAN 3050 - Advanced Grammar and Syntax 

SPAN 3060 - Advanced Grammar and Syntax for Native Speakers 

SPAN 3 1 1 1 - Civilization and Culture of Spain 

SPAN 3120 - Civilization and Culture of Latin America 

SPAN 3200 - Introduction to Literature 
Four to six courses selected from the following three categories. Select at least one course from 

each category. SPAN 4040 must be chosen. A minimum of one other course must be at the 

4000 level. 
Category One: 

SPAN 3210 - Spanish Peninsular Literature I 

SPAN 3220 - Spanish Peninsular Literature II 

SPAN 4070 - Contemporary Spanish Peninsular Novel 

SPAN 4080 - Spanish Peninsular Theatre 

SPAN 4100 - Spanish Peninsular Poetry 
Category Two: 

SPAN 3230 - Spanish American Literature I 

SPAN 3240 - Spanish American Literature II 

SPAN 4060 - Contemporary Spanish American Novel 

SPAN 4090 - Spanish American Theatre 

SPAN 41 10 - Spanish American Poetry 
Category Three: 

SPAN 4010 - Special Genre 

SPAN 4020 - Special Author 

SPAN 4030 - Special Topics 

SPAN 4040 - Spanish Phonetics 

SPAN 4900 - Independent Study 

SPAN 4990 - Language Internship (3 semester hours) 

C. Related Field Courses 15 hours 

Fifteen (15) semester hours (minimum) of 3000-4000 level courses from the College of Arts 
and Sciences 

D. Electives 21 hours 



Total Semester Hours 123 hours 

E. Regents' Test and Exit Exam 



104 ARMSTRONG ATLANTIC STATE UNIVERSITY 



PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF ARTS IN SPANISH 
WITH TEACHER CERTIFICATION 

A. General Requirements: 

Core Areas A, B, C, D, and E 42 hours 

AreaF 18 hours 

SPAN 1002 -Spanish II 

SPAN 2001 - Intermediate Spanish I 

SPAN 2002 - Intermediate Spanish II 

ENGL 2100 - Literature and Humanities (if taken in area C, 

replace with elective at 1000-2000 level) 
CEUG 1010 - Human Growth and Development 
CEUG 2100 - Teaching and the Exceptional Child 
Physical Education 3 hours 

B. Major Field Courses 30 hours 

Four to six courses selected from: 

SPAN 3031 - Spanish Conversation and Composition I 

SPAN 3032 - Spanish Conversation and Composition II 

SPAN 3050 - Advanced Grammar and Syntax 

SPAN 3060 - Advanced Grammar and Syntax for Native Speakers 

SPAN 31 1 1 - Civilization and Culture of Spain 

SPAN 3120 - Civilization and Culture of Latin America 

SPAN 3200 - Spanish Peninsular Literature II 
Four to six courses selected from the following three categories. Select at least one course from 

each category. SPAN 4040 must be chosen. A minimum of one other course must be at the 

4000 level. 
Category One: 

SPAN 3210 - Spanish Peninsular Literature I 

SPAN 3220 - Spanish Peninsular Literature II 

SPAN 4070 - Contemporary Spanish Peninsular Novel 

SPAN 4080 - Spanish Peninsular Theatre 

SPAN 4100 - Spanish Peninsular Poetry 
Category Two: 

SPAN 3230 - Spanish American Literature I 

SPAN 3240 - Spanish American Literature II 

SPAN 4060 - Contemporary Spanish American Novel 

SPAN 4090 - Spanish American Theatre 

SPAN 41 10 - Spanish American Poetry 
Category Three: 

SPAN 4010 - Special Genre 

SPAN 4020 - Special Author 

SPAN 4030 - Special Topics 

SPAN 4900 - Independent Study 

SPAN 4990 - Language Internship 

C. Related Field Courses 18 hours 

MGSE 3351 - Secondary School Curriculum and Methods 

MGSE 4442 - Curriculum and Methods of Foreign Language Education 

MGSE 4630 - Classroom Management 

MGSE 4750 - Student Teaching and Seminar (9 semester hours) 

D. Electives 6 hours 



Total Semester Hours 123 hours 

E. Regents' Test and Exit Exam 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 105 



MATHEMATICS 

Faculty 

Ed Wheeler, Department Head 

Jane Barnard Dale Kilhefner 

Jim Brawner John Leo 

John Hansen Larry Lesser 

Sabrina Hessinger Tim McMillan 

Selwyn Hollis Richard Munson 

General Information 

The Department of Mathematics offers the degrees of bachelor of science in mathematical 
sciences. Option 1 of the mathematics major - "mathematics" - prepares students to pursue 
graduate studies. Option 2 -"applied mathematics" - is a good choice for students preparing for 
careers in business and industry, or intending to attend graduate school in a quantitative area (such 
as biostatistics, economics, or operations research), or wishing to participate in a dual-degree 
program in engineering. Option 3 - "mathematics education" - prepares students to teach in public 
and private secondary schools. This option is an approved program for the Georgia Teacher's 
Professional Four Year Certificate (T-4). 

The department also offers a wide range of services to Armstrong Atlantic students. Several 
introductory courses are available to satisfy general education needs as well as prerequisites in 
other major programs. Intermediate level courses for non-majors are available to enhance the 
quantitative skills of students in a variety of disciplines. A minor in mathematics can be designed 
to complement students' major programs. 

Special Programs 

Dual Degree Program. Under arrangements with Georgia Tech, students may in five years 
of study earn simultaneously the bachelor's degree in the mathematical sciences from Armstrong 
Atlantic and the bachelor's degree in any one of a number of fields of engineering from Georgia 
Tech. Armstrong Atlantic participates in similar programs with other major universities. Students 
considering a dual degree program should contact an advisor in the Department of Mathematics 
as soon as possible. 

Progress Requirements 

To earn the bachelor's degree in the mathematical sciences, students must complete with a 
grade of C or better all mathematics and computer science courses required in the program of 
study. A grade of C or better is also required to fulfill the prerequisites for any mathematics course 
except MATH 1111. 

Minors 

Mathematics 17 hours 

MATH 2072 
MATH 2083 

Nine additional semester hours chosen from MATH 2160 and mathematics courses 
numbered 3000 or higher (excluding MATH 391 1, 3932, and 4960, -70, -80) 



106 ARMSTRONG ATLANTIC STATE UNIVERSITY 



PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN 
MATHEMATICAL SCIENCES 

A. General Requirements 

Core Areas A, B, C, D, and E 42 hours 

Mathematics majors are required to take MATH 1 1 13 in core area A and 
MATH 1161 in core area D 

AreaF 18 hours 

One hour excess for MATH 1161 from area D 

MATH 2072 - Calculus II 

MATH 2083 - Calculus III 

MATH 2160 - Linear Algebra 

CSCI 1301 - Introduction to Programming Principles I 

Two hours of approved lower division electives 

Physical Education 3 hours 

Complete major field and related area requirements for one of the following options: 
Option 1: Mathematics 

B. Major Field Courses 27 hours 

MATH 3000 - Introduction to Mathematical Proof 

MATH 31 10 - Abstract Algebra 

MATH 3211 - Probability and Mathematical Statistics 

MATH 3411 - Differential Equations 

MATH 401 1 - Advanced Calculus I 

One course selected from: 

MATH 3170 - Advanced Linear Algebra 

MATH 4022 - Advanced Calculus II 

MATH 5160 - Theory of Numbers 
Nine semester hours of upper-division mathematics exclusive of MATH 3911, 3932, 

and 4960, -70, -80 

C. Related Field Courses 19 hours 

Six semester hours from either a single foreign language sequence or six semester 

hours from computer science courses with a prerequisite of at least CSCI 1301. 
Twelve semester hours chosen from courses in the College of Arts and Sciences to 

complete the requirement of at least 39 semester hours of upper-division courses. 
Option 2: Applied Mathematics 

B. Major Field Courses 21 hours 

MATH 3000 - Introduction to Mathematical Proof 
MATH 321 1 - Probability and Mathematical Statistics 
MATH 3411 - Differential Equations 
One course selected from: 

MATH 31 10 - Abstract Algebra 

MATH 3170 - Advanced Linear Algebra 

MATH 401 1 - Advanced Calculus I 

MATH 5160 - Theory of Numbers 
Nine additional semester hours of upper-division mathematics exclusive of 

MATH 391 1, 3932, and 4960, -70, -80 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 107 



C. Related Field Courses 25 hours 

Complete the prescribed courses in one of the following concentration areas. 
Actuarial science: 

ECON 2105 or ECON 2106 

2 courses selected from: 

ECON 3050, 3060, 3300, 3500, 3600, or 3700 
MATH 3222, 3251, 3460, or 4200 
Biology: minor in biology 
Chemistry: minor in chemistry 
Computer science: minor in computer science 
Economics: minor in economics 
Engineering studies: minor in engineering studies 
Operations research: 

MATH 3222 

MATH 3251 

MATH 3460 

MATH 3480 

MATH 4610 

MATH 4400 
Physics: minor in physics 

Additional courses to complete the requirement of at least 39 semester hours of upper- 
division courses. These courses may be chosen from mathematics, the concentration area, 

ENGL 3720, or HIST 5640. 

Option 3: Mathematics Education 

PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN 

MATHEMATICS WITH TEACHER CERTIFICATION 

B. Major Field Courses 24 hours 

MATH 3000 - Introduction to Mathematical Proof 

MATH 31 10 - Abstract Algebra 

MATH 3211 - Probability and Mathematical Statistics 

MATH 3360 - Modern Geometry 

MATH 3932 - Teaching of Middle School/General Mathematics 

One course selected from: 

MATH 5160U - Theory of Numbers 

MATH 5700U - History of Mathematics 
Six additional semester hours of upper-division mathematics exclusive of MATH 391 1, 

and 4960, -70, -80 

C. Related Field Courses 24 hours 

CEUG 1010 - Human Growth and Development 

CEUG 2100 - Teaching and the Exceptional Child 

MGSE 3351 - Secondary School Curriculum and Methods, General 

MGSE 4412 - Secondary School Curriculum and Methods, Mathematics 

MGSE 4630 - Classroom Management 

MSGE 4750 - Student Teaching (9 semester hours) 

D. Electives 12-14 hours 



Total Semester Hours 123 hours 

Regents' Test and Exit Exam 



108 ARMSTRONG ATLANTIC STATE UNIVERSITY 



PSYCHOLOGY 

Faculty 

Keith Douglass, Interim Department Head 
Joseph Lane Vann Scott 

Grace Martin Stephen Taylor 

Elliot Palefsky 

General Information 

The Department of Psychology offers two degrees, the bachelor of arts in psychology, and the 
bachelor of arts in psychology leading to teacher certification in special education: behavior 
disorders. Minors are available in psychology, mental health, and organizational psychology. 
Studies have shown that psychology majors have the opportunity to develop strengths in five 
important areas: critical thinking, problem solving, oral communication, written communication, 
and interpersonal skills. 

The psychology program is based in the research tradition and offers preparation for both 
graduate school and entry into the job market. Besides specific courses required for the degree, 
students select from a variety of content courses including clinical, developmental, testing, 
personality, physiological, social, and industrial and organizational psychology. During the 
senior year, capstone courses include research projects, community internships, and senior 
seminar. 

Special Programs 

An honors program is available, and the department recognizes student achievement by 
awarding the Stu Worthington Award for academic achievement and the Cindy McCormick 
Award for Outstanding Service to seniors in psychology. 

Progress Requirements 

Along with other academic policies of the university, candidates for bachelor's degrees in 
psychology must earn at least a C in every required course in the major. All minors also require 
a C or better in each course. 

Minors 

Psychology 15 hours 

PSYC 1101 

Twelve semester hours of upper division course work 
Mental Health 18 hours 

PSYC 1101, 3020, 3160, 3280, 4060, 5150U 
Organizational Psychology 18 hours 

PSYC 1101, 3020, 4060, 3150, 3200, 3210. 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 109 



PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF ARTS IN 
PSYCHOLOGY 

A. General Requirements 

Core Areas A, B, C, D, and E 42 hours 

AreaF 18 hours 

PSYC 1101 - General Psychology 

PSYC 2200 - Introduction to Psychological Research 

ANTH 1102 - Introduction to Anthropology 

BIOL 1 107 - Principles of Biology I 

BIOL 1 108 - Survey of the Animal Kingdom 

Physical Education 3 hours 

B. Major Field Courses 30 hours 

PSYC 3120 - Measurement 

PSYC 4080 - Learning and Motivation 
PSYC 4100 - History and Systems of Psychology 
PSYC 41 10 - Senior Seminar 
Two courses from: 

PSYC 3070 - Perception 

PSYC 3090 - Physiological Psychology 

PSYC 3190 - Animal Behavior 

PSYC 3500 - Cognitive Psychology 

PSYC 4060 - Behavior Modification 
Two courses from: 

PSYC 3030 - Experimental Social Psychology 

PSYC 31 10 - Theories of Personality 

PSYC 3160 - Clinical Psychology 

PSYC 3200 - Industrial/Organizational Psychology 

PSYC 3280 - Abnormal Psychology 
Two courses from: 

PSYC 3020 - Psychological Testing 

PSYC 3150 - Psychology of Conflict and Stress 

PSYC 3210 - Psychology of Work Behavior 

PSYC 3750 - Psychology of Aging 

PSYC 4120 - Senior Project 

PSYC 4130 - Senior Internship 

C. Related Field Courses 18 hours 

MATH 2220 - Elementary Statistics 

CSCI 1050 - Introduction to Computer Concepts and Applications 
Two course sequence of foreign language above 1002 
Two courses (3000+) from the following: 

psychology, sociology, anthropology, or economics 

D. Electives 12 hours 

One upper division course (3000+) and 3 other electives 



Total Semester Hours 123 hours 

E. Regents' Test and Exit Exam 



110 ARMSTRONG ATLANTIC STATE UNIVERSITY 



PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF ARTS IN 
PSYCHOLOGY LEADING TO TEACHER CERTIFICATION IN SPECIAL 
EDUCATION: BEHAVIOR DISORDERS 

A. General Requirements 

Core Areas A, B, C, D, and E 42 hours 

AreaF 18 hours 

PSYC 1101 - General Psychology 

PSYC 2200 - Introduction to Psychological Research 

ANTH 1 102 - Introduction to Anthropology 

BIOL 1 107 - Principles of Biology I 

BIOL 1 108 - Survey of the Animal Kingdom 

Physical Education 3 hours 

B. Major Field Courses 27 hours 

PSYC 3120 - Measurement 

PSYC 3160 - Clinical Psychology 

PSYC 3280 - Abnormal Psychology 

PSYC 3500 - Cognitive Psychology 

PSYC 4060 - Behavior Modification 

PSYC 4080 - Learning and Motivation 

PSYC 4100 - History and Systems of Psychology 

PSYC 41 10 - Senior Seminar 

One course from: 

PSYC 2010 - Human Growth and Development 

PSYC 2950 - Developmental Psychology 

CEUG 1010 - Human Growth and Development 

C. Related Field Courses 12 hours 

CSCI 1050 - Introduction to Computer Concepts and Applications 

MATH 2220 - Elementary Statistics 

Two course sequence of Spanish beyond 1001 

D. Professional Sequence 21 hours 

CEUG 2100 - Teaching and the Exceptional Child 

CEUG 3072 - Teaching of Reading 

EEXE 4100 - Student Teaching P-12 (six semester hours) 

EEXE 3500 - Characteristics of Behavioral Disorders 

EEXE 3510 - Methods for Teaching Behavioral Disorders 

CEUG 5010U - Education Tests and Measurements or PSYC 3020 - Psychological Testing 



Total Semester Hours 123 hours 

E. Regents' Test; Praxis Behavior Disorders and ACAT-P Media Module; Admission to 
Teacher Education; Student Portfolio 



COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 



College of Education 

Lloyd Newberry, Dean 
Patricia Brandt, Assistant Dean 



Accreditation 



All teacher education programs at Armstrong Atlantic State University are accredited by the 
Georgia Professional Standards Commission and the National Council for Accreditation of 
Teacher Education. 

Philosophy and Goals 

The College of Education offers a variety of degree programs designed to prepare competent 
teachers committed to excellence in the profession and prepared to ensure success for all students. 
All degree programs in the College of Education are guided by specific objectives reflecting 
university goals. Seven principles defining the conceptual framework of the College of Education 
guide curriculum activity, implementation, and evaluation of goals and objectives. These 
principles are: P-16 initiatives; collaboration with faculty in the College of Arts and Sciences; 
sensitivity to diversity within our society; management and utilization of technology; acceptance 
of the evolving definition of teaching and all the implications for curriculum activity; learned 
societies and program standards; and proactive and goal-driven programs of study that are 
developmental in scope and sequence. 

The goals of the college are to provide prospective teachers with proficiency in the content of 
their chosen teaching fields; learning theory and methodology necessary for successful imple- 
mentation of classroom plans and procedures; abilities and skills enabling them to offer 
appropriate educational opportunities to students from diverse cultural and economic back- 
grounds; abilities and skills enabling them to meet the special needs of exceptional children; and 
a professional and educational atmosphere conducive to the development of the highest qualities 
of character, commitment, and professional competence. 

Organization and Degrees 

The College of Education includes the departments of Early Childhood Education; Health and 
Physical Education; Middle Grades and Secondary Education; and Special Education. The 
degrees offered in the College of Education are as follows: 
Bachelor of Science in: 

Education in Early Childhood Education (PK-5) 

Health and Physical Education (P-12) 

Education in Middle Grades Education (4-8) 

Education in Speech-Language Pathology 
Master of Education in: 

Elementary Education 

Middle Grades Education 
Secondary Education in: 

English Education 

Mathematics Education 

Broadfield Science Education 

Broadfield Social Science Education 
Special Education in: 

Behavior Disorders 

Learning Disabilities 

Speech-Language Pathology 



112 ARMSTRONG ATLANTIC STATE UNIVERSITY 



The degrees offered in the College of Education in conjunction with the College of Arts and 
Sciences are as follows: 
Bachelor of Arts in: 

English with Teacher Certification 
History with Teacher Certification 
Political Science with Teacher Certification 

Psychology leading to Teacher Certification in Special Education: Behavior Disorders 
Spanish with Teacher Certification (P-12) 
Bachelor of Music Education (P-12) 
Bachelor of Science in: 

Biology with Teacher Certification 
Chemistry with Teacher Certification 
Mathematical Sciences with Teacher Certification 
Bachelor of Science in Education in: 
Art Education (P-12) 
Social Science Education (History) 
Social Science Education (Political Science) 
The degrees offered in the College of Education in conjunction with Savannah State University 
are as follows: 

Bachelor of Science in Education in Business Education 
Master of Education in Business Education 
Refer to the Armstrong Atlantic State University Graduate Catalog for further information on 
graduate programs. 

Special Programs 

Alternative Teacher Preparation. The Alternative Teacher Preparation Program has been 
approved for those holding a baccalaureate or higher degree from an accredited college or 
university but not yet eligible for a license to teach. Successful completion of all program 
requirements will result in recommendation for a clear renewable certificate. Admission criteria 
for the alternative preparation program include but are not limited to: (1) an earned baccalaureate 
degree or advanced degree from an accredited college or university, and (2) a cumulative grade 
point average of 2.5 (unrounded) on a 4.0 scale for all college course work attempted. 

Students who have taken staff development courses covering the content in CEUG 3072 - The 
Teaching of Reading, or MGSE 4280 - Teaching Literature Through Reading in the Content Areas, 
and CEUG 2 1 00 - Teaching and the Exceptional Child, must pass a competency examination in order 
to receive credit. Alternative preparation students must meet program and course prerequisites. 
Please see the appropriate department head for additional information. The competency examination 
can be arranged through the office of professional laboratory experiences. 

Brunswick Center. The bachelor of science in education with concentrations in early 
childhood and middle grades education is offered by Armstrong Atlantic State University at 
Coastal Georgia Community College through the Brunswick Center. The program allows students 
who have an associate degree to complete their baccalaureate degree in Brunswick. Interested 
students should contact the director of teacher education or the resident advisor at the Brunswick 
Center. 

Savannah State University Cooperative. Savannah State University cooperates with 
Armstrong Atlantic State University to offer a major in business education, with course work in 
the major field of study offered by Savannah State University. Students can also earn an 
Armstrong Atlantic degree in middle grades education on the Savannah State campus. Students 
interested in either of these programs should contact the head of the Department of Middle Grades 
and Secondary Education at Armstrong Atlantic State University. 

Policies and Procedures 

Academic Advisement. Students wishing to pursue teacher education leading to certification 
should seek academic advisement in the appropriate department — Early Childhood Education, 



COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 1 13 



Health and Physical Education, Middle Grades and Secondary Education, Special Education - or 
see one of the full-time advisors who work with College of Education students. Students are 
responsible for obtaining advisement. Advisors will help students to establish programs of study 
which must be followed precisely. Department head approval is required for all courses on the 
official program of study form. Program of study forms will be filed in the appropriate 
departments, with copies provided to students. 

Admission to Teacher Education. Students wishing to pursue teacher education leading to 
certification must apply for admission to the teacher education program. Application forms are 
available at the admission to teacher education meeting held every semester. 

Students seeking admission to the teacher education program must meet the standards 
described in the Teacher Education Program Handbook. The standards of the College of 
Education are aligned with the standards of the Georgia Professional Standards Commission for 
certification and include a criminal background check. College of Education standards also 
incorporate essential functions for teaching and a code of ethics and expected behavior for 
students in the program. 

The following criteria apply for admission to the teacher education program in the Depart- 
ments of Early Childhood Education, Middle Grades and Secondary Education, and Special 
Education: 

1 . Completion of at least 40 semester hours of college credit with a minimum cumulative 2.5 
(unrounded) grade point average over all college course work attempted. 

2. Completion of ENGL 1101 and 1 102 or their equivalents with a C or better in each course. 

3. Satisfactory completion of MATH 1111. 

4. Satisfactory completion of the Regents' Test. Students already holding baccalaureate 
degrees from an accredited institution are exempt from the Regents' Test. 

5. Successful completion of oral screening. 

6. Indication of desirable attitude, character, and teaching potential. 

7. Successful completion of Praxis I.* Students earning qualifying scores on the SAT, GRE, 
or ACT may be exempt from this requirement. 

8. Submission of four letters of recommendation (these letters may be secured from colleges 
or universities where applicants have been enrolled previously). 

9. Submission of an up-to-date copy of the program of study. 

10. Completion of approved ten hours of volunteer service in an educational setting. 

1 1 . Notarized consent form for criminal background check. 

The following criteria apply for admission to the teacher education program in the Department 
of Health and Physical Education: 

1 . Completion of at least 40 semester hours of college credit with a minimum cumulative 2.5 
(unrounded) grade point average over all college course work attempted. 

2. Completion of ENGL 1101 and 1 102 or their equivalents with a grade ofC or better in each 
course. 

3. Satisfactory completion of MATH 1111. 

4. Satisfactory completion of the Regents' Test. Students already holding baccalaureate 
degrees from an accredited institution are exempt from the Regents' Test. 

5. Successful completion of oral screening. 

6. Successful completion of Praxis I.* Students earning qualifying scores on the SAT, GRE, 
or ACT may be exempt from this requirement. 

7. Submission of an up-to-date copy of the program of study. 

8. Completion of PEHM 2900 or equivalent with a grade of C or better. 

9. Three hours of physical education core courses with a grade of B or better. 

10. An overall grade point average of 2.5 in PEHM 2500, PEHM 3080, PEHM 2701. and 
PEHM 2702. 

1 1. Submission of four letters of recommendation with at least two from major professors and 
one from the Department of Health and Physical Education. 

12. Notarized consent form for criminal background check. 



114 ARMSTRONG ATLANTIC STATE UNIVERSITY 



*Praxis I: All students (undergraduate and alternative preparation) applying for admission to 
teacher education during and since winter quarter 1998 must pass all three sections of the Praxis 
I before being admitted, even if they previously passed the written screening for admission to 
teacher education before winter quarter 1998. 

Student Teaching. Student teaching, the culminating activity of the professional sequence, is 
performed in selected off-campus school centers. Applications for admission to student teaching 
are obtained at the admission to student teaching meeting held during the semester prior to student 
teaching. Completed applications must be submitted to the director of professional laboratory 
experiences one semester prior to the student teaching semester. School placement is arranged 
jointly by the university and the participating school system; students receive letters of assign- 
ment. Students are required to adhere to established policies and procedures of the cooperating 
school system in addition to those policies and procedures established by the university. 
Orientation to student teaching will be held at the beginning of the semester in which student 
teaching is scheduled. The following requirements must be met before students may enroll in 
student teaching: 

1. Completion of all courses on the program of study. 

2. Admission to teacher education. 

3. Satisfactory completion of all related field experiences including the pre-planning practicum. 
Alternative preparation students are exempt from the pre-planning practicum. 

4. Completion of a total of nine hours of methods and curriculum courses and the classroom 
management course at Armstrong Atlantic State University. Students seeking secondary 
education certificates take the classroom management course during student teaching. 

5. A cumulative 2.5 unrounded grade point average on all courses attempted, and a grade of 
C or better in all courses in the teaching field, professional sequence, concentration, and 
related electives. 

6. Recommendation by the College of Education faculty. If other than PK-5 or 4-8, students 
must also have recommendations from their major departments as well. 

7. Valid certification in child and adult CPR and community first aid to be current throughout 
the student teaching semester. 

8. Completion of an approved pre-service portfolio (required of students in early childhood 
education, art education, music education, and Spanish education). 

9. Ten hours of professional development. 

10. Praxis II. Students must take Praxis II before beginning student teaching and must pass 
Praxis II before completing student teaching. 

11. Payment of $250.00 student teaching fee (required of students admitted to the teacher 
education program after August 20, 1998). 

Students who are unsuccessful may apply to student teach one additional time if they complete 
the prescribed program of remediation as outlined by the university supervisor. 

Internship. Applications for internship must be submitted to the office of professional 
laboratory experiences one semester prior to the semester in which the first internship is requested. 
Students will be informed of their eligibility upon receipt of the completed application and prior 
to their first internship semester. Any questions about policies or the application process should 
be addressed to the director of professional laboratory experiences. Students must show their letter 
of eligibility in order to register for internship; students cannot preregister for internship. The 
following requirements must be met before a student may enroll in internship: 

1 . Admission to teacher education. 

2. Clearance from the office of professional laboratory experiences. 

3. A bachelor's degree or higher. 

4. A 2.5 unrounded grade point average or higher on ALL previous college work attempted. 

5. A signed program of study which approves internship as an alternative to student teaching. 

6. A current provisional teaching certificate in the field of certification being pursued. Interns 
must pass PRAXIS II in order to receive a provisional certificate. Provisional certificates 
are not available in early childhood education. 

7. Employment in a full-day program of teaching, in the major field, with typical classroom 
responsibilities. 



COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 1 1 5 



8. Employment in a school accredited by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools. 

9. Completion at Armstrong Atlantic of a minimum of nine hours of curriculum and methods 
courses and the course in classroom management with a grade of C or better. 

10. Approval form completed by the principal of the school where the intern is employed. 

1 1 . Valid certification in community first aid and child and adult CPR to be current throughout 
the internship period. 

1 2. Payment of $250.00 internship fee (required of students admitted to the teacher education 
program after August 20, 1998). 

Program Completion. Students must complete the university's approved program for 
certification within four years following admission to the teacher education program. If a student 
does not complete the program in four years, he or she must meet the requirements of the program 
in effect at that time. For acceptable completion, each course in the teaching field, professional 
education sequence concentration, and related fields must be passed with a grade of C or better. 

Graduation and Certification. Students are required to submit a completed application for 
graduation, updated copy of their transcripts, and program of study form to their advisors in the 
College of Education two semesters prior to graduating. Applications will be checked and 
approved by the appropriate department heads. 

To be recommended for a teaching certificate, students must complete the requirements for an 
approved teacher certification program on an approved program of study, must pass PRAXIS II 
in the certificate field, and must complete at Armstrong Atlantic State University a majority of the 
courses in each of the following areas: the professional sequence, the teaching field, and the related 
field. 

Other Requirements 

Liability Insurance Requirement All students who participate in courses with required field 
experiences and practicums must provide evidence of liability insurance or sign a waiver of 
insurance coverage. 

Pre-Planning Practicum. The pre-planning practicum provides an opportunity for future 
teachers to learn what teachers do at the beginning of a new school term, participate in experiences 
that will help them decide whether to pursue teaching as a career, and become acquainted with the 
organization and curriculum of a particular school. 

Pre-planning practicums are scheduled at the beginning of the public school term during 
students' junior or senior years. The pre-planning practicum is required, but students do not 
receive academic credit. Alternative preparation students are exempt from this practicum. 

Applications should be made during the first week of the spring semester for pre-planning 
practicums for the next August. Students should contact the office of professional laboratory 
experiences for further information. 

Portfolio. Students are required to create portfolios demonstrating their attainment of program 
goals and Professional Standards Commission standards. See department heads for specific 
information and details. 

Minors 

A minor in teacher education is available for students who do not wish to earn teacher 
certification. The minor incorporates courses which address leading concepts and problems in the 
field of education. Students majoring in general studies, psychology, health science, and other 
fields may find this minor a valuable adjunct to their programs of study. All courses in the minor 
must be passed with a grade of C or better. See advisor for specific course information. 

Minors (and majors, if taken as double majors) are also available in library media. Refer to the 
Department of Early Childhood Education for more information. 



116 ARMSTRONG ATLANTIC STATE UNIVERSITY 



EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION 

Faculty 

Maryellen Cosgrove, Acting Department Head 
Stephen Agyekum John Hobe 

Patricia Ball Cheryl McFadden 

Bettye Anne Battiste Marsha Moore 

Patricia Brandt Margaret Walworth 

Evelyn Dandy 

General Information 

The Department of Early Childhood Education offers the degree of bachelor of science in early 
childhood education. The bachelor of science in education in art education is offered in 
conjunction with the Department of Art, Music, and Theatre. Majors and minors in library media 
are available; however, the major in library media is only available as part of a double major. For 
complete requirements for the degree leading to teacher certification at the elementary level, see 
"Special Programs," "Policies and Procedures," and "Other Requirements" in the College of 
Education section of this catalog. 

Special Programs 

Library Science/Media. The library science/media program has two emphases: (1) basic 
information skills courses and specialized skills courses designed to help students in specific 
subject areas develop research skills; and (2) a major and minor in library media designed to 
prepare students for support positions in academic, public, and special libraries. Students wishing 
to become school media specialists must complete a master's degree program to be certified in the 
state of Georgia. The library media program provides a solid foundation toward an advanced 
degree in library media and information science. 

Minors 

Library Media. A student choosing to minor in library media is required to complete the 
following courses with grades of C or better in each: 

LMUG 3000, LMUG 3100 LMUG 3200, LMUG 4100, LMUG 4200, LMUG 4250 

PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN 
EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION 

A. General Requirements (Core Areas A, B, C, D, and E) 42 hours 

Core Area F 18 hours 

CEUG 1010 - Human Growth and Development 

CEUG 2100 - Teaching and the Exceptional Child 

ECUG 2020 - Environmental, Social, and Health Issues of the Young Child 

COMM 2280 - Speech Communication 

MATH 2900 - Spirit and Structure of Math 

GEOG 1 1 1 1 - Physical Geography 

or 
GEOG 2120 - Cultural Geography 
Physical Education 3 hours 



COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 117 



B. Major Field Courses* 51 hours 

ECUG 3040 - Childhood and Adolescence 

ECUG 3050 - Curriculum and Methods P-5 

ECUG 3060 - Language and Cognition 

ECUG 307 1 - Literature and Literacy 

ECUG 3090 - Creative Activities 

ECUG 3100 - Contemporary Social Issues of the Family 

ECUG 31 10 - Pre- Kindergarten Practicum 

ECUG 3120 - Movement and Health of the Young Child 

ECUG 4070 - Social Studies 

ECUG 4080 - Life and Physical Science 

ECUG 4090 - Classroom Management 

ECUG 4100 - Student Teaching and Seminar I** 

ECUG 41 10 - Student Teaching and Seminar II** 

CEUG 3072 - Teaching of Reading 

C. Related Field Course* 3 hours 

MATH 391 1 - Math for Elementary School Teachers 

*Must be admitted into teacher education to enroll in these courses. 
**Must also be admitted into student teaching to enroll in these courses. 

D. Content Electives 6 hours 

Two courses from: 

METR 3100 - Introduction to Meteorology 

OCEA 3100 - Introduction to Oceanography 

GEOL 2010 - Introduction to Physical Geology 

GEOL 3100 - Introduction to Historical Geology 

ASTR 3100 - Introduction to Stellar Astronomy 

PSYC 3280 - Abnormal Psychology 

PSYC 3020 - Psychological Testing 

ANTH 3050 - North American Indians 

ARTS 3200 - Art and the Child 

LMUG 3100 - Reference Sources 

LMUG 3200 - Cataloguing and Classification 

MUSC 3200 - Music for the Elementary Teacher 

PEEC 3200 - Health and Physical Education for the Elementary School Teacher or 

any other English, history or science courses (3000 or above) 



Total Semester Hours 123 hours 

E. Regents' Test and Praxis I and II 

PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN 
EDUCATION IN ART EDUCATION 

A. General Requirements (Core Areas A, B, C, D, and E) 42 hours 

AreaF 18 hours 

ARTS 1020 - 2D Design 

ARTS 1030 -3D Design 

ARTS 1010 - Drawing I 

ARTS 2710 -Art History I 

CEUG 1010 - Human Growth and Development 

CEUG 2100 - Teaching and the Exceptional Child 

Physical Education 3 hours 



118 ARMSTRONG ATLANTIC STATE UNIVERSITY 



B. Major Field Courses 54 hours 

ARTS 1011 -Drawing II 

ARTS 2720 - Art History II 
ARTS 2011 -Painting I 
ARTS 2012 -Painting II 
ARTS 2040 - Photography 
ARTS 2150 - The Computer in Art 
ARTS 2400 - Introduction to Craft 
ARTS 3300 - Ceramics I 
ARTS 3400 - Printmaking I 
ARTS 3700 - Figure Sculpture 
ARTS 3750 - Contemporary Art and Criticism 
ARTS 4500 - Curriculum and Methods in Art Education 
ARTS 3500 - Art in Elementary Grades 
ARTS 3510 - Art for the Pre- Adolescent and Adolescent 
Any upper division craft class 
Any art elective 

Six semester hours of upper division studio courses from one of the following areas: drawing 
and painting, sculpture, ceramics, crafts, or photography. 

C. Related Field Courses* 12 hours 

CEUG 41 10** - Student Teaching P-12 

CEUG 4630* - Classroom Management P-12 
*Must be admitted into teacher education to enroll in these courses 
**Must also be admitted into student teaching to enroll in these courses 

Total Semester Hours 129 hours 

D. Regents' Test, Orientation to Teaching or equivalent, Admission to Teacher Educa- 
tion including Praxis I, Education Teaching Portfolio, Admission to Student 
Teaching, Current Certification in CPR/First Aid, Senior Art Show, Senior Art 
Gallery Talk, Praxis II Exit Exam. 

LIBRARY MEDIA DOUBLE-MAJOR PROGRAM (NON-CERTIFICATION) 

A. Major Field Courses 18 hours 

LMUG 3000 - Introduction to Media Profession 

LMUG 3100 - Reference Sources 

LMUG 3200 - Cataloguing and Classification 

LMUG 4100 - Media Selection 

LMUG 4200 - Administration of Information Centers 

LMUG 4250 - Media Internship 

B. Related Field Courses 3 hours 

CSCI 1050 - Introduction to Computer Concepts and Applications 

or 

CSCI 1060 - Computer Concepts and Applications for Science Students 

C. Electives 15 hours 

Total Semester Hours 36 hours 



COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 119 



HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

Faculty 

Michael Lariscy, Department Head 

Eddie Aenchbacher Virginia Knorr 

Karen Clevenger Lynn Roberts 

Roger Counsil Greg Wimer 

Andreas Koth 

General Information 

The Department of Health and Physical Education offers the degree of bachelor of science in 
education in health and physical education, as well as a physical education minor with a choice 
of coaching or athletic training emphasis. The department provides a range of academic, service, 
and athletic programs in an intellectually, physically, and socially stimulating environment. 

The bachelor's degree in health and physical education provides the student with a degree 
leading to teacher certification P-12 in the areas of health and physical education. Students 
selecting this major should seek advisement in the Department of Health and Physical Education. 
Provisions for transfer of credits are delineated in the Academic Regulations section of the 
catalog. Students pursuing this degree should read "Special Programs", "Policies and Proce- 
dures", and "Other Requirements" in the College of Education section of this catalog. 

In addition, the department provides the physical education courses required of all Armstrong 
Atlantic students. During the freshman and sophomore years, all students must complete PEBC 
2000 (Concepts of Fitness) or three semester hours of physical education activity courses. 
Students unable to participate in the regular program must plan an alternative program with the 
department head of health and physical education. 

Special Programs 

Physical Education Service Program. The department provides a wide variety of offerings 
emphasizing life-long physical activities; basic skills and appreciation of recreational sports and 
activities; and certification in aquatics and safety, first aid and CPR. The department also provides 
basic instruction in personal health practices and behaviors. 

The Intramural Program. The department provides opportunities to the entire university 
community for participation in a wide variety of sports and recreational activities, regardless of 
ability. Sportsmanship and increased physical fitness are encouraged among all participants and 
spectators. 

The Community Service Program. Activities designed to appeal to the community and allow 
access to the campus gymnasia and field facilities enhance the university's relationship w Ufa the 
community and provide an environment of learning and enjoyment for all. 

Progress Requirements 

Students must complete core requirements and pass the Regents' Test. Students declaring a 
physical education major are assigned faculty advisors. Conferences must be scheduled to 
determine any and all conditions and requirements students must meet in order to complete degree 
and certification objectives. Students are responsible for initiating and maintaining the advise- 
ment process. Students must apply for admission to teacher education, which requires .1 2.5 grade 
point average, completion of media competency, pre-planning practicum. application tor student 
teaching, Praxis I, and education orientation or equivalent. In addition, students must successful!) 
complete all departmental requirements, including all additional major courses, proficienc) tests, 
and Praxis II. Application for graduation must be made two semesters before graduation. See the 
College of Education section of this catalog for complete information. 



120 ARMSTRONG ATLANTIC STATE UNIVERSITY 



Minors 

Coaching Emphasis 18 hours 

PEAT 2100 - Prevention and Care of Sport Injuries 

Two courses selected from: PEEC 3120, PEEC 3130, PEEC 3140, PEEC 3150 
Two courses selected from: PEHM 3070, PEEC 3330, PEEC 3340 

Two courses selected from: PEHM 3500, PEHM 3700, PEHM 3770, PEHM 3780, PEHM 
3800, PEHM 4400 

Athletic Training Emphasis 18 hours 

PEHM 2282, PEHM 2283, PEHM 3500, PEAT 3450, PEAT 3460, PEAT 4050 

Athletic Training Internship 28 Hours 

PEHM 228 1 , PEHM 2282, PEHM 2283, PEHM 3500, PEHM 3780, PEAT 3450, PEAT 3460, 

PEAT 4050, PEAT 4400, PEAT 4480 
In addition to the above courses, students are required to complete 1500 hours in an athletic 
training setting to be eligible to take the NAT A boards. 

PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN 
EDUCATION IN HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

A. General Requirements (Core Areas A, B, C, D, and E) 42 hours 

Core Area F 18 hours 

CEUG 1010 - Human Growth and Development 

CEUG 2100 - Teaching and the Exceptional Child 

PEAT 2100 - Prevention and Care of Sport Injuries 

PEHM 2281 - Human Structure and Function I 

PEHM 2283 - Kinesiology 

PEHM 2500 - Foundations of Physical Education 

PEHM 2900 - Technology in Health and Physical Education 

Physical Education 3 hours 

B. Major Field Courses 58 hours 

PEHM 2701 - Team Sport Techniques I 

PEHM 2702 - Team Sport Techniques II 

PEHM 3000 - Current Health Education Issues 

PEHM 3780 - Substance Abuse Education 

PEHM 3500 - Exercise Physiology 

PEHM 3050 - Theory and Techniques of Dance 

PEHM 4701 - Elementary Curriculum and Methods 

PEHM 3770 - Health and Human Sexuality Education 

or HSCP 3770 - Health/Sexuality Education 
PEHM 3060 - Recreational Games 
PEHM 3700 - Individual and Dual Sports 
PEHM 3800 - Sport Strategies and Methods 
PEHM 4050 - School Health Education 
PEHM 4702 - Curriculum Development and Application I 
PEHM 4200 - Assessment in Health and Physical Education Programs 
PEHM 4300 - Management Skills in Health and Physical Education 
PEHM 3070 - Aquatics 
PEHM 3080 - Outdoor Education 
PEHM 4400 - Fitness Theory and Application 

PEHM 4703 - Middle/Secondary Physical Education Curriculum and Methods 
PEHM 4900 - Student Teaching/Seminar 

C. Approved Electives 3 hours 



Total Semester Hours 123 hours 

D. Regents' Test and Praxis I and II 



COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 121 



MIDDLES GRADES AND SECONDARY EDUCATION 

Faculty 

Patricia Coberly, Acting Department Head 

JoAnn Coleman Chris Schuberth 

George Chenault Michelle Sisson 

Mary-Louise Meyer Edward Strauser 

Lloyd Newberry Thomas Worley 

Warren Schollaert Freya Zipperer 

General Information 

The Department of Middle Grades and Secondary Education offers the degrees of bachelor 
of science in education in middle grades education. The degree of bachelor of science in education 
in social science education (history) is offered in conjunction with the Department of History, and 
the degree of bachelor of science in education in social science education (political science) is 
offered in conjunction with the Department of Criminal Justice, Social and Political Science. The 
department offers the degree of bachelor of science in education in business education in 
conjunction with Savannah State University. For complete requirements for degrees leading to 
teacher certification at the middle and secondary level, see "Special Programs," "Policies and 
Procedures," and "Other Requirements" in the College of Education section of this catalog. 

PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN 
EDUCATION IN MIDDLE GRADES EDUCATION 

A. General Requirements (Core Areas A, B, C, D, and E) 42 hours 

Core Area F 18 hours 

CEUG 1010 - Human Growth and Development 

CEUG 2100 - Teaching and the Exceptional Child 

COMM 2280 - Speech Communication 

GEOG 1 1 1 1 - Physical Geography 

MATH 2900 - Spirit and Structure of Math 

MGSE 2150 - Adolescent Growth and Development 

Physical Education 3 hours 

B. Major Field Courses* 36 hours 

MGSE 3060 - Curriculum and Methods (4-8) 

MGSE 3071 - Language Arts Theory and Practice 

MGSE 3080 - Student and Program Evaluation 

MGSE 3100 - Middle School Theory and Practice 

MGSE 4090 - Classroom Management (4-8) 

MGSE 4100 - Student Teaching and Seminar I** 

MGSE 41 10 - Student Teaching and Seminar II** 

MGSE 4280 - Teaching Literacy through Reading in the Content Areas 

MGSE 4342 - Social Studies Theory and Practice (4-8) 

MGSE 4340 - Physical Science Theory and Practice*** 

or 
MGSE 4350 - Life Science Theory and Practice*** 

C. Related Field Courses* 6 hours 

MATH 391 1 - Math for Elementary School Teachers 

MATH 3932 - Teaching of Middle School/General Math 
*Must be admitted into teacher education to enroll in these courses. 
**Must also be admitted into student teaching to enroll in these courses. 
***Must select MGSE 4350 if a physical science is taken in area D or select MGSE 4340 if a life 
science is taken in area D. 

D. Concentration Electives 18 hours 

Three (3) advisor-approved upper division courses (3000 level or higher) 

above the core required for each of two areas of concentration 



Total Semester Hours 123 hours 

E. Regents' Test and Praxis I & II 



122 ARMSTRONG ATLANTIC STATE UNIVERSITY 



PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN 
EDUCATION IN SOCIAL SCIENCE EDUCATION (History) 

A. General Requirements (Core Areas A, B, C, D, and E) 42 hours 

Core Area B (One of the following global perspective courses is recommended 

for certification purposes.) 

POLS 1150 -World Politics 

POLS 2250 - International Organizations 

POLS 2290 - Foundations of International Relations 

GEOG 1100 - World Regional Geography 

ANTH 1150 - Global Perspectives in Anthropology: Peoples of the World 

HIST 1111 - Civilization I 

HIST 11 12 -Civilization II 
Core Area D (The following course is recommended for certification purposes.) 

MATH 2200 

Core Area F 18 hours 

CEUG 1010 - Human Growth and Development 

CEUG 2100 - Teaching and the Exceptional Child 

GEOG 1 1 1 1 - Physical Geography or 

GEOG 2120 - Cultural Geography 

MATH 2200 - Elementary Statistics* 

Foreign Language 1002 

Foreign Language 2001 

* If taken in area D, substitute approved social science or history course. 

Physical Education 3 hours 

B. Major Field Courses 21 hours 

HIST 4500 - Historical Methods 

HIST 21 1 1 - History of America to 1877 or 

HIST 2212 - History of America since 1865 (or approved social science 

course if already taken in area E) 
HIST 3710 - Colonial and Revolutionary America or 
HIST 3770 - U.S. History 1917-1960 
Approved American history course 
One or two approved European history course(s) 
One or two approved non-western history course(s) 

C. Related Field Courses 18 hours 

MGSE 3351 - Secondary School Curriculum and Methods, General* 

MGSE 4492 - Secondary School Curriculum and Methods, Social Science* 

MGSE 4630 - Classroom Management* 

MGSE 4750 - Student Teaching and Seminar** 
*Must be admitted into teacher education to enroll in these courses. 
**Must also be admitted into student teaching to enroll in these courses. 

D. Content Electives 21 hours 

Two upper division courses each from two of four approved social science fields (as 

determined by social science courses selected in areas B, E, & F) 
Two other approved social science courses 
A second civilization course (if not already taken in areas B or E), or another approved social 

science course 

Total Semester Hours 123 hours 

E. Regents' Test and Praxis I & II 



COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 123 



PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN 
EDUCATION IN SOCIAL SCIENCE EDUCATION (Political Science) 

A. General Requirements (Core Areas A, B, C, D, and E) 42 hours 

Core Area B (One of the following global perspective courses is recommended for 
certification purposes.) 

ANTH 1 150 - Global Perspectives in Anthropology: Peoples of the World 

GEOG 1 100 - World Regional Geography 

HIST 1111 - Civilization I 

HIST 11 12 -Civilization II 
Core Area D (The following course is recommended for certification purposes.) 

MATH 2200 - Elementary Statistics 

Core Area F 18 hours 

CEUG 1010 - Human Growth and Development 

CEUG 2100 - Teaching and the Exceptional Child 

GEOG 1 1 1 1 - Physical Geography or 

GEOG 2120 - Cultural Geography 

MATH 2200 - Elementary Statistics* 

Foreign Language 1002 

Foreign Language 2001 

* If taken in area D, substitute approved social science or history course. 

Physical Education 3 hours 

B. Major Courses 21 hours 

Six courses from four areas with at least one course from each area: 

Area One 

POLS 3170 - Constitutional Law and the Federal System 

POLS 3180 - Constitutional Civil Liberties 

POLS 41 10 - American Presidency 

POLS 4120 - Congress and Political Parties 

POLS 4150 - American Supreme Court 
Area Two 

POLS 3300 - Political Philosophy: Ancient and Medieval 

POLS 3310 - Modern Political Philosophy 

POLS 3320 - American Political Thought 

POLS 3330 - Contemporary Political Thought 
Area Three 

POLS 3260 - International Law 

POLS 4200 - Independent Study in International Relations 

POLS 4280 - Seminar in Global Politics 

POLS 4290 - American Foreign Policy 

POLS 4400 - Independent Study in Comparative Government 
Area Four 

POLS 3420 - Politics of Underdevelopment: Africa and Latin America 

POLS 3460 - Governments of East Asia 

POLS 3480 - Governments of Western Europe 

POLS 3490 - The Political Transformation of the Former Soviet Union 
Capstone Course 

POLS 4950 - Seminar in Political Science 

C. Related Field Courses 18 hours 

MGSE 3351 - Secondary School Curriculum and Methods, General* 

MGSE 4492 - Secondary School Curriculum and Methods, Social Science* 

MGSE 4630 - Classroom Management* 

MGSE 4750 - Student Teaching and Seminar** 
*Must be admitted into teacher education to enroll in these courses. 
**Must also be admitted into student teaching to enroll in these courses. 



124 ARMSTRONG ATLANTIC STATE UNIVERSITY 

D. Related Field Electives 21 hours 

Two upper division courses each from two of four approved history/social science fields (as 

determined by history /social science courses selected in areas B, E, & F) 
One other upper division history course 
Two other approved social science courses 

Total Semester Hours 123 hours 

E. Regents' Test and Praxis I & II 

PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN 
EDUCATION IN BUSINESS EDUCATION 

A. General Requirements (Core Areas A, B, C, D, E) 42 hours 

Core Area F - Business Core 18 hours 

ACCT 2101 - Principles of Financial Accounting 

ACCT 2102 - Principles of Managerial Accounting 

BUS A 1 100 - Introduction to Business 

BUS A 2105 - Communicating in the Business Environment 

ECON 2105 - Principles of Microeconomics 

ECON 2106 - Principles of Macroeconomics 

Physical Education 3 hours 

Freshman Year Experience 2 hours 

B. Foundation of Knowledge of Business 36 hours 

BUS A 2106 - The Environment of Business 

BUSA 4125 -Public Policy 

BUSA 4126 - Business Policy 

CISM 3135 - Advanced Computer Applications in Business 

ECON 3145 - Global Business Issues 

FINC 3155 - Business Finance 

MKTG 3175 - Principles of Marketing 

MGNT 3165 - Organizational Behaviour and Theory 

MGNT 3167 - Management of Technology 

QUAN 2181 - Quantitative Methods of Business I 

QUAN 2182 - Quantitative Methods of Business II 

QUAN 3185 - Quantitative Methods and Production Management 

C. Major: Management with Emphasis in Business Education 24 hours 

Orientation to Business Education Module 

CEUG 1010 - Human Growth and Development 

CEUG 2100 - Teaching and the Exceptional Child 

MGNT 4167 - Training and Development for Human Resources 

MGSE 3351 - Secondary School Curriculum and Methods, General* 

MGSE 4630 - Classroom Management* 

MGSE 4750 - Student Teaching and Seminar** 
*Must be admitted into teacher education to enroll in these courses. 
**Must also be admitted into student teaching to enroll in these courses. 

Total Semester Hours 125 hours 

D. Regents' Test and Praxis I & II 



COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 125 



SPECIAL EDUCATION 

Faculty 

Pamela Harwood, Acting Department Head 

Robin Barton Donald Hall 

Joyce Bergin Robert Loyd 

Donna Brooks Constance Wambold 

Migdalia Garcia Susan White 

General Information 

The Department of Special Education offers a bachelor of science in education in speech- 
language pathology. The undergraduate speech-language pathology program does not prepare 
students for initial certification regardless of the work setting. All students must complete a 
graduate training program in speech-language pathology to be eligible for certification and/or 
licensure. 

Admission Requirements 

Interested students must meet the established requirements for admission to the speech- 
language pathology program and to the College of Education. All interested students must see a 
College of Education advisor to determine their program admission status. 

Special Requirements 

The speech-language pathology (SLP) program requires that students pass a speech, language, 
and hearing screening administered by the program faculty. Students must earn an average of 3.0 
or better in the following courses: Introduction to Communicative Disorders; Phonetics; Anatomy 
and Physiology of Speech and Hearing Mechanisms. Each student must have a positive endorse- 
ment from a member of the speech-language pathology faculty based upon established SLP 
professional conduct standards. Students must have earned a cumulative overall grade point 
average of 2.5 for acceptance into the SLP program. 

PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN 
EDUCATION IN SPEECH-LANGUAGE PATHOLOGY 

A. General Requirements (Core Areas A, B, C, D, and E) 42 hours 

Core Area F 18 hours 

CEUG 1010 - Human Growth and Development 

CEUG 2100 - Teaching and the Exceptional Child 

PSYC 1101 - General Psychology 

COMM 2280 - Speech Communication 

MATH 2900 - Spirit and Structure of Math 

ECUG 2020 - Environmental, Social, and Health Issues of the Young Child 

Physical Education 3 hours 

B. Major Field Courses 48 hours 

SLPA 1220 - Introduction to Communication Disorders 

SLPA 2250 - Phonetics 

SLPA 2230- Anatomy and Physiology of Speech and Hearing Mechanisms 

SLPA 3150 - Normal Speech and Language Development 

SLPA 3410 - Introduction to Audiology 

SLPA 3420 - Language Disorders 

SLPA 3430 - Organically Based Communication Disorders 

SLPA 3450 - Articulation Disorders 

SLPA 4140 - Non- Verbal Communication 



126 



ARMSTRONG ATLANTIC STATE UNIVERSITY 



SLPA 4170 - Introduction to Diagnostic Procedures in Speech-Language Pathology 

SLPA 4180 - Directed Observations in Speech-Language Pathology 

SLPA 4190 - Clinical Methods in Speech-Language Pathology 

SLPA 4210 - Senior Seminar 

SLPA 4350 - Speech Science 

SLPA 4450 - Practicum in Speech-Language Pathology 

SLPA 4500 - Introduction to Research in Speech-Language Pathology 

C. Related Field Courses 9 hours 

CEUG 3072 - Teaching of Reading 

PSYC 3020 - Psychological Testing 
PSYC 3280 - Abnormal Psychology 

D. Free Electives 3 hours 



Total Semester Hours 

E. Regents' Test and Praxis I 



123 hours 



COLLEGE OF HEALTH PROFESSIONS 127 

College of Health Professions 

James Repella, Dean 
Marilyn Buck, Assistant Dean 

Philosophy and Goals 

The College of Health Professions employs innovative teaching strategies to prepare compe- 
tent, caring, adaptable health care practitioners. College faculty members conduct and apply 
research to expand health care knowledge and delivery, improving the quality of life of our 
region's citizens through community and professional service. Through academic excellence the 
college provides leadership to the region in promoting health and delivering health care. 

The College of Health Professions strives to deliver innovative educational programs and 
services; achieve educational and practical excellence through creative use of traditional and 
innovative instructional techniques and technology; cultivate professional relationships through 
interactions among faculty, students, and community; communicate the humanistic values that 
underlie effective practice; utilize critical thinking to improve both the educational process and 
service delivery; and emphasize both the acceptance and initiation of change through collabora- 
tive partnerships within and without the college. 

Organization and Degrees 

The College of Health Professions includes the Departments of Dental Hygiene; Health 
Science; Medical Technology; Nursing; Physical Therapy; Radiologic Sciences; and Respiratory 
Therapy. The degrees offered in the College of Health Professions are as follows: 

Associate of Science in Dental Hygiene 
Bachelor of Health Science 
Bachelor of Science in: 

Dental Hygiene Education 

Medical Technology 

Nursing 

Physical Therapy 

Radiologic Technologies 

Respiratory Therapy 
Master of Health Services Administration 
Master of Public Health 
Master of Science in: 

Nursing 

Physical Therapy 

Those interested in detailed information on graduate programs should refer to the School of 
Graduate Studies section of this catalog and to the Armstrong Atlantic State University Graduate 
Catalog. 

Special Programs 

Interdisciplinary Core Curriculum. The College of Health Professions has developed a 
series of interdisciplinary courses designed to provide health professions students \\ ith common 
knowledge, skills and values needed to practice in evolving health care delivers systems. ThiscofC 

curriculum includes introductory courses in health care and medical terminology, research, 
pharmacology, basic patient care skills, and an interdisciplinary seminar. 



128 ARMSTRONG ATLANTIC STATE UNIVERSITY 



Policies and Procedures 

Professional Standards for Applicants and Students. All applicants and students in the 
College of Health Professions must meet and continue to meet the approved professional 
standards of the college and its programs. No one who jeopardizes the health or well being of a 
patient, client, coworker, or self, will be accepted into the College of Health Professions or 
continue as a student in one of the college's programs. To meet the intellectual, physical and social 
competencies needed for professional requirements, all applicants and students must possess the 
necessary physical attributes and exhibit qualities of good judgment, mental strength, and 
emotional stability. Individual programs will inform all applicants in writing of the technical 
standards related to the professional duties of their disciplines. The faculty of each department 
shall be responsible for applying the standards for their students and prospective students. 

The health care professional's self-presentation is a vital part of the complex relationship 
among the client, the health care provider, and the health care delivery site. The College of Health 
Professions reserves the right to limit attire and adornments (such as clothing, jewelry, piercing, 
tattooing) of the body and its parts (such as hands, hair, face, oral cavity). See the policies of the 
respective departments for the enforcement of the college-wide policy. In all cases, final appeal 
may be made to the dean of the college who will appoint an appeals committee. 

Limits on Admission and Progress Requirements. There are many more students applying 
for admission to these programs than we have spaces available. Therefore, it is important that 
you contact the program of your choice for advisement as soon as possible. Neither admission 
to Armstrong Atlantic State University nor completion of prerequisite courses guarantees your 
admission to a health professions program. Because each program has its own admission criteria 
and procedure for admission, students must apply to the particular programs they wish to enter. 

No more than two (2) science courses may be repeated, and no one course may be repeated 
more than once. If a student fails a course a second time, he or she will not be eligible for 
admission to health programs for which this course is a requirement. Only students making 
satisfactory progress toward admission to or in an Armstrong Atlantic health program will be 
assigned or retain a seat. 

Limits on Readmission. Students failing (i.e., a grade lower than C) two courses in their 
majors or failing the same major course twice are ineligible for readmission to that major. 

Other Requirements 

Health and Insurance. Completed health histories, evidence of health insurance, and 
evidence of liability (malpractice) insurance are required of students in dental hygiene, medical 
technology, nursing, physical therapy, radiologic science, and respiratory therapy. 

DENTAL HYGIENE 

Faculty 

Barbara Tanenbaum, Department Head 

Teresa Coursey Janice Mengle 

Suzanne Edenfield Barbara Stubbs 

Accreditation 

The dental hygiene curriculum is approved by the Commission on Dental Accreditation of the 
American Dental Association. 






COLLEGE OF HEALTH PROFESSIONS 129 

General Information 

The Department of Dental Hygiene offers two degrees: associate of science in dental hygiene, 
and bachelor of science in dental hygiene education. Dental hygiene programs at Armstrong 
Atlantic are designed to educate students who will demonstrate the following: competency in 
clinical skills; respect for the dental team; possession of ethical and professional standards; ability 
to apply both academic and state-of-the-art technical knowledge gained from their general 
education, dental hygiene, and biomedical and dental science courses; effective communication 
skills; and well-developed critical thinking and research skills enhancing an interest in life-long 
learning and professional improvement. 

Associate of Science in Dental Hygiene. Practicing under the supervision of dentists, dental 
hygienists provide dental health services in private dental offices, civil service positions, industry, 
and various public health fields. They must pass national and regional or state board examinations 
for licensure. This program requires completion of a two-year curriculum. Students will work with 
dental hygiene faculty and participate in classes, clinics, laboratories, and extra-mural rotations. 

Bachelor of Science in Dental Hygiene Education. The bachelor's degree program is 
designed for the post-associate degree registered dental hygienist. The program provides addi- 
tional education to prepare registered dental hygienists to assume key roles in educational and 
other settings. Students may enter the program on a full or part-time basis. The program includes 
courses that will enable graduates to be employed in areas such as dental hygiene and dental 
assisting education, consulting, management, marketing, research, and public health. Students 
will work with the dental hygiene faculty and participate in the student teaching practicums in 
various associate degree classes, clinics, laboratories, and extra-mural facilities. 

Special Programs 

Armstrong Atlantic/Coastal Georgia and East Georgia Innovative Curriculum. The 

Department of Dental Hygiene offers a part-time curriculum via distance learning for students 
who have been formally admitted to the program and reside in either the Brunswick or S wainsboro 
service areas. Application, admission, requirements, and policies for this program are consistent 
with the traditional associate degree program. Information and applications for this program can 
be obtained by contacting the department. 

Admission Requirements 

Associate of Science in Dental Hygiene. Admission to Armstrong Atlantic State University 
does not in any way guarantee admission to the associate degree program in dental hygiene. 
Applicants must first be accepted to the university with regular admission status before the dental 
hygiene admissions committee evaluates their completed applications to the associate degree 
program in dental hygiene. See "Limits on Admission" in the College of Health Professions 
section of this catalog. Students matriculate in the fall semester of every year. Applications for 
admission must be completed by the deadline for the fall semester and must include transcripts 
of all academic work. Please contact the department for application deadline date. 

Admission to the associate degree dental hygiene major is on a space-available basis, and 
meeting requirements does not guarantee admission to the dental hygiene major. The dental 
hygiene admissions committee determines the best qualified students by using an admission point 
index system. This system is based upon college grade point average, number of college credits 
completed, and science grade point average. Special emphasis is placed upon grades earned in 
CHEM 2010, BIOL 2081, BIOL 2082, and BIOL 2210 (or their equivalents). The following are 
additional admission requirements: 

• Eligibility for ENGL 1 1 1 and MATH 1101 

• Minimum adjusted college grade point average of 2.0 

• All items listed under "Special Requirements" 



130 ARMSTRONG ATLANTIC STATE UNIVERSITY 



Transfer applicants and those with degrees in other fields must meet the criteria established for 
admission to the dental hygiene major. Transfer credit will be awarded depending upon equiva- 
lency of courses. These decisions will be made by dental hygiene faculty members using actual 
course syllabi, outlines, descriptions, and the like, supplied by the transfer student. 

Upon admission, students must pay a $100.00 non-refundable deposit to reserve a place in the 
program. This deposit is applied to first semester matriculation fees. 

Bachelor of Science in Dental Hygiene Education. Applicants for the program must be 
graduates of accredited associate degree dental hygiene programs and licensed as registered dental 
hygienists. It is preferred that applicants have at least one year of professional experience, which 
may include any dental-related work experience. Students begin their course of sequenced dental 
hygiene courses in the fall semester, therefore, application for admission should be completed 
prior to the beginning of fall semester. 

Transfer credits are accepted for courses other than the professional sequence; however, a 
minimum of 30 semester hours must be earned at Armstrong Atlantic State University for this 
degree to be awarded from this institution. The office of the registrar will evaluate all transfer 
credits. The department has a formal admission process separate from the admission process for 
the university, and application to each must be made separately. Additional admission require- 
ments include the following: 

• A minimum 2.0 grade point average on all previous college work. Students transferring from 
another college must have this average to be considered for admission. The 2.0 average must 
be maintained to date of actual matriculation in the program. 

• National board scores submitted to the Department of Dental Hygiene 

• Proof of state licensure submitted to the Department of Dental Hygiene 

• Applicable items under "Special Requirements" 

Special Requirements 

Health and Insurance. All students are required to submit completed medical report forms, 
evidence of health insurance, and evidence of liability (malpractice) insurance prior to participa- 
tion in clinical experiences. 

Legal. The Georgia Board of Dentistry shall have the authority to refuse to grant a license to 
an applicant who has been convicted of any felony or any crime involving moral turpitude. This 
law is further defined in 43-1 1-47 of the Georgia Board of Dentistry Laws . Because of the inability 
of these persons to become or remain registered dental hygienists, persons to whom this law 
applies may not be admitted into or may be dismissed from the program. 

Technical. Minimum physical and communication standards are part of the admission 
process. Complete technical standards are included in the admissions information packet. 

CPR. Students must obtain certification prior to providing patient services in DH YG 1 1 02 and/ 
or entry into the bachelor of science degree program. 

Progress Requirements 

All students must earn a C or better in each dental hygiene course before entering subsequent 
dental hygiene courses. A grade of D or F will result in students' dismissal from the program. 

Students must earn a C or better in each of the four required natural science courses (CHEM 
2010, BIOL 2081, BIOL 2082, BIOL 2210) that are prerequisite to the 2000-level dental hygiene 
courses. No more than two science courses may be repeated and no more than one course may be 
repeated more than once. If a student fails a course a second time, he or she will not be eligible 
for admission to the dental hygiene program. If a student fails two courses in the dental hygiene 
major or fails the same course twice in the dental hygiene major, that student is ineligible for 
readmission to the dental hygiene program. Students must have passed the Regents' Test before 
entering their last semester, and an overall grade point average of 2.0 is required for graduation. 



COLLEGE OF HEALTH PROFESSIONS 131 



Challenge Examinations. Challenge examinations for specific dental hygiene subject areas 
are available in the department. Contact the department for information. 

Associate Degree in Dental Hygiene. Students must complete the two-year program of 78 
semester hours within four consecutive academic years from the date of initial entry into the 
program. Students who do not complete the program within this time must apply for readmission 
(see "Readmission Requirements"). 

Readmission Requirements 

Students must complete readmission applications for both Armstrong Atlantic State Univer- 
sity and the Department of Dental Hygiene, and must meet admission and curriculum requirements 
in effect at time of readmission. 

Readmission will be based upon space availability and recommendation by the dental hygiene 
admissions committee. Students' previous credits must be evaluated at the time of readmission. 
A grade of D or F in a dental hygiene course will result in dismissal and future ineligibility for 
readmission to the dental hygiene program. 

PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF ASSOCIATE OF SCIENCE IN DENTAL 
HYGIENE 

A. General Requirements 33 hours 

ENGL 1 101 - Composition I 

ENGL 1 102 - Composition II 

MATH 1 1 1 1 - College Algebra 

CHEM 2010 - Essentials of Chemistry 

BIOL 2081 - Human Anatomy and Physiology I 

BIOL 2082 - Human Anatomy and Physiology II 

BIOL 2210 - Microorganisms and Disease 

HIST/POLS 1 100 - Political History of America and Georgia 

SOCI 1101 - Introductory Sociology 

PSYC 1 101 - General Psychology 

Physical Education 2 hours 

B. Major Field Courses 43 hours 

DHYG 1 100 - Head and Neck Anatomy 

DHYG 1 101 - Clinical Dental Hygiene I 

DHYG 1 102 - Clinical Dental Hygiene II 

DHYG 1 1 10 - Dental Anatomy 

DHYG 1 120 - Dental Roentgenology 

DHYG 1 130 - General and Oral Pathology and Oral Histology 

DHYG 1 140 - Periodontics 

DHYG 2201 - Clinical Dental Hygiene III 

DHYG 2202 - Clinical Dental Hygiene IV and Ethical Decisions 

DHYG 2210 - Pharmacology, Emergency Management, and Anesthesiology 

DHYG 2220 - Dental Materials 

DHYG 2230 - Applied Nutrition 

DHYG 2240 - Preventive Periodontics 

DHYG 2250 - Dental Public Health 



Total Semester Hours 78 hours 

C. Regents' Test and Exit Exam 



132 ARMSTRONG ATLANTIC STATE UNIVERSITY 



PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN DENTAL 
HYGIENE EDUCATION 

A. General Requirements (Core Areas A, B, C, D.2.B., and E) 42 hours 

Core Area F 39 hours 

Credit based on valid dental hygiene licensure and passing applicable national, state and/or 
regional examinations and program specific courses taken as part of the career associate degree 
at AASU or another accredited dental hygiene program. The 18 hours of area F are included 
in the 39 hour career block. Area F plus lower level dental hygiene courses equal 39 hours. 
Physical Education 3 hours 

B. Major Field Courses 21 hours 

DHED 3300 - Dental Hygiene Research 

DHED 4400 - Foundations of Dental Hygiene Education 

DHED 4401 - Educational Methods in Dental Hygiene Education I 

DHED 4402 - Educational Methods in Dental Hygiene Education II 

DHED 4403 - Directed and Individual Study 

HLPR 4200 - Interdisciplinary Health Professions Seminar 

One course selected from: 

DHED 3310 - Dental Management of Medically Compromised Patients 

DHED 4410 - Advanced Periodontics 

DHED 4490H - Honors Advanced Periodontics 

C. Related Field Courses 18 hours 

HSCA 4640 - Managed Care Concepts 

HSCP 5550U - Nutrition 

PSYC 3750 - Psychology of Aging 

PSYC 3050 - Topics in Development 

or 
PSYC 3500 - Cognitive Psychology 
One course selected from: 

HSCA 4620 - Health Care Administration 

HSCC 3120 - Health Policy and Law 

HSCP 3720 - Ethical Theories and Moral Issues in Public Health 
One course selected from: 

HSCG 5500U - Survey of Gerontology 

HSCG 5510U - Healthy Aging 



Total Semester Hours 123 hours 

D. Regents' Test and Exit Exams 



HEALTH SCIENCE 

Faculty 

James Streater, Department Head and Graduate Coordinator of Public Health 
Dave Dumpe, Graduate Coordinator of Health Services Administration 
Joey Crosby Emma Simon 

Robert Lefavi Linda Wright 

General Information 

Offering the degree of bachelor of health science, the Department of Health Science provides 
educational opportunities for both those wishing to enter a health field and those experienced 
health professionals wishing to further their career opportunities by additional academic work. 
More specifically, the objectives of the program are to teach students that behavioral change can 
occur through education; to prepare students to foster health, promote health, and prevent disease; 



COLLEGE OF HEALTH PROFESSIONS 133 



and to provide opportunities for students to gain special expertise in the health-related areas of 
health promotion, education, administration, nursing and allied health professions, or athletic 
training. 

The curriculum emphasizes a view that "health" is different from "illness" and is designed to 
teach new students and practicing health professionals this difference. The curriculum permits 
students to earn a baccalaureate degree reflecting expertise in health science while focusing on an 
applied health-related area. Upon graduation, these health professionals will implement the 
concepts they have learned and direct the efforts of the public in the promotion, enhancement, and 
maintenance of health and in the prevention of health problems. 

Special Programs 

Health Science Gerontology Certificate Program. The program provides students with a 
multi-disciplinary background in aging and offers an opportunity to explore aspects of aging 
relevant to personal interests and career goals. Students who complete the application for 
admission to the certificate program and return it to the Department of Health Science will be 
invited to meet with an assigned faculty member to discuss the proposed program of study. A 
minimum grade of C or better must be earned in each course for the certificate to be awarded on 
the undergraduate level. The gerontology certificate program consists of six courses ( 1 8 semester 
hours), and all courses listed are pre- or corequisites to HSCG 5520U. 
Required courses (9 hours): 
HSCG 5500U - Survey of Gerontology 
HSCG 5510U - Healthy Aging 
HSCG 5520U - Gerontology Practicum 
Three courses (9 hours) chosen from: 
HSCP 5550U - Nutrition 
PS YC 3750 - Psychology of Aging 
PEEC 5580U - Physical Activity and the Older Adult 
Approved elective course(s) 

Admission Requirements 

In addition to a completed health science program application made to the department, students 
must seek regular admission to Armstrong Atlantic State University. Students must be eligible for 
MATH 1111 or ENGL 1101, and must undergo a formal interview conducted by health science 
faculty members. 

Progress Requirements 

Students must earn a grade of C or better in each course in the health science core and emphasis 
area. Courses may be repeated only once; thus, students failing to earn a C or better in the second 
attempt will be dismissed from the program. 

Students must complete the degree program within six consecutive years from the date of their 
initial admission to the major. Students who do not complete the program within this time limit 
must apply for readmission, meet current criteria for admission, and have their previous credits 
calculated. Students who are granted readmission must meet course requirements in effect at the 
time of readmission. 

Senior students must successfully complete the bachelor of health science exit exam, as well 
as the university's general education exit exam, during the last semester before graduation. All 
bachelor of health science students must have current CPR certification at the time of graduation. 



134 ARMSTRONG ATLANTIC STATE UNIVERSITY 



PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF HEALTH SCIENCE 

A. General Requirements (Core Areas A, B, C, D.I., and E) 42 hours 

Core Area F 18 hours 

COMM 2280 - Speech Communication 

CSCI 1050 - Computer Concepts and Applications 
HLPR 1100 - Health Care and Medical Terminology 
HSCC 21 10 - Health and Human Development 
Two courses selected from: 

MATH 2200 - Statistics* 

ANTH 1102 - Anthropology** 

ECON 2105 - Macroeconomics** 

PSYC 1101 - Psychology** 

SOCI 1101 -Sociology** 
* If not taken in area D. 
**Ifnot taken in area E. 
Physical Education 3 hours 

B. Major Field Courses 17 hours 

HLPR 2000 - Research in the Health Professions 

HSCC 3000 - Health Issues and Resources 
HSCC 3010 - Health Communication Strategies 
HSCC 3120 - Health Policy and Law 
HSCC 3140 - Epidemiology 
HSCC 4010 - Health Planning and Marketing 

C. Related Field Courses 43 hours 

Student will choose one specialty track. 

Health Services Administration 

HSCA 3601 - Health Care Finance I 

HSCA 3602 - Health Care Finance II 

HSCP 3710 - Worksite Wellness and Safety 

HSCP 3720 - Ethical Theories and Moral Issues in Public Health 

HSCA 4610 - Health Care Economics 

HSCA 4620 - Health Care Administration 

HSCA 4630 - Health Information Systems 

HSCA 4640 - Managed Care Concepts 

HSCA 4920 - Health Services Administration Practicum 

PSYC 3200 - Industrial/Organizational Psychology 

PSYC 3210 - Psychology of Work Behavior 

HLPR 4200 - Interdisciplinary Health Professions Seminar 

Electives (6 hours) 
Long Term Care 

HSCA 3601 - Health Care Finance I 

HSCA 3602 - Health Care Finance II 

HSCP 3710 - Worksite Wellness and Safety 

HSCA 4610 - Health Care Economics 

HSCA 4620 - Health Care Administration 

HSCA 4640 - Managed Care Concepts 

HSCA 4650 - Long Term Care Management 

HSCA 4901 - Health Science Practicum I 

HSCA 4902 - Health Science Practicum II 

HSCA 5650U - Seminar in Long Term Care Administration 

HSCG 5500U - Survey of Gerontology 



COLLEGE OF HEALTH PROFESSIONS 135 



HSCG 5510U - Healthy Aging 

HLPR 4200 - Interdisciplinary Health Professions Seminar 

PSYC 3200 - Industrial/Organizational Psychology 

Electives (3 hours) 
Public Health 

HSCP 3730 - Health Promotion Theory 

HSCP 3740 - Health Promotion Methods 

HSCP 3750 - Topics in Public Health 

HSCP 4900 - Health Science Practicum 

HSCP 5700U - Environmental Health Issues 

HLPR 1200 - Multidisciplinary Skills in Health Professions 

A minimum of 17 semester hours chosen from the following: 

PEHM 2281 - Human Structure and Function I 

PEHM 2282 - Human Structure and Function II 

HSCP 3710 - Worksite Wellness and Safety 

HSCP 3720 - Ethical Theories and Moral Issues in Public Health 

HSCP 3770 - Health/Sexuality Education 

HSCP 3780 - Health and Drug Education 

HSCP 3790 - Health and Fitness Management 

HSCP 4000 - Independent Study in Health Sciences 

HSCA 4620 - Health Care Administration 

HSCA 4630 - Health Information Systems 

HSCA 4640 - Managed Care Concepts 

HSCP 5550U - Nutrition 

HSCG 5500U - Survey of Gerontology 

HSCG 5510U - Healthy Aging 

PSYC 3150 - Conflict and Stress 

PSYC 3200 - Industrial/Organizational Psychology 
Electives (9 hours) 
Athletic Training 

PEHM 2281 - Human Structure and Function I 

PEHM 2282 - Human Structure and Function II 

PEHM 2283 - Kinesiology 

PEHM 3500 - Exercise Physiology 

PEHM 3770/HSCP 3770 - Health and Human Sexuality Education 

PEHM 3780/HSCP 3780 - Substance Abuse Education 

PEHM 4400 - Fitness Theory and Application 

PEAT 2100 - Prevention and Care of Sports Injuries 

PEAT 3450 - Evaluation and Treatment of Lower Body Injuries 

PEAT 3460 - Evaluation and Treatment of Upper Body Injuries 

PEAT 4050 - Therapeutic Modalities in Rehabilitation 

PEAT 4400 - Planning and Management of Athletic Training Programs and Facilities 

PEAT 4480 - Seminar in Athletic Training 

PEAT 5350U - Field Experience in Athletic Training - Training Room 

PEAT 5360U - Field Experience in Athletic Training - Lab School 

PEAT 5370U - Field Experience in Athletic Training: Clinic 



Total Semester Hours 123 hours 

D. Regents' Test and Exit Exams 



136 ARMSTRONG ATLANTIC STATE UNIVERSITY 



Pre-Physical Therapy 

A. General Requirements 42 hours 

(Core Areas A (must take MATH 1113), B, C, D.2.A., and E) 

Core Area F 18 hours 

PHYS 1111 -Physics I 

PHYS 11 11L- Physics I Lab 

BIOL 2081 - Human Anatomy and Physiology I 

BIOL 2082 - Human Anatomy and Physiology II 

CSCI 1050 - Computer Concepts and Applications 

HLPR 1 100 - Health Care and Medical Terminology 

Physical Education 3 hours 

B. Major Field Courses 24 hours 

HSCC 21 10 - Health and Human Development 

HSCC 3000 - Health Issues and Resources 
HSCC 3010 - Health Communication Strategies 
HSCC 3120 - Health Policy and Law 
HSCC 3140 - Epidemiology 
HSCC 4010 - Health Planning and Marketing 
HLPR 2000 - Research in the Health Professions 
PHYS 11 12 -Physics II 
PHYS 1112L- Physics II Lab 

C. Professional Physical Therapy Program* 36 hours 

PHTH 5101U - Functional and Structural Aspects of Movement I 

PHTH 5131U - Foundations of Physical Therapy Assessment and Treatment I 

PHTH 5161U - Physical Therapy Practice Issues I 

PHTH 5181U - Clinical Practicum I 

PHTH 5202U - Functional and Structural Aspects of Movement II 

PHTH 5232U - Foundations of Physical Therapy Assessment and Treatment II 

PHTH 5262U - Physical Therapy Practice Issues II 

PHTH 5282U - Clinical Practicum II 

PHTH 5290U - Physical Therapy Case Management 

* If admitted to the professional phase of the physical therapy program. 



Total Semester Hours 123 hours 

D. Regents' Test and Exit Exams 

MEDICAL TECHNOLOGY 

Faculty 

Lester Hardegree, Department Head 
Anne Rodgers 

Accreditation Statement 

The degree program in medical technology is accredited by the National Accrediting Agency 
for Clinical Laboratory Sciences (NAACLS) for the period 1985-2004. 

General Information 

The Department of Medical Technology offers the bachelor of science degree in medical 
technology (leading to a career in clinical laboratory science) and a post-baccalaureate certificate 
in medical technology. Medical technologists perform and/or supervise the testing of blood, urine, 
spinal fluid, and other body specimens. Applying a knowledge of chemistry, mathematics, and 
biology, the medical technologist uses both manual and automated techniques to provide 
diagnostic data to physicians. 



COLLEGE OF HEALTH PROFESSIONS 137 



During the first two or three years of the four-year program, students complete core curriculum 
courses in chemistry, biology, mathematics, humanities, and social sciences. The four-semester 
professional phase starts every fall semester. Courses cover the major laboratory areas (urinalysis, 
hematology, clinical chemistry, blood banking, microbiology, serology) and are taught on 
campus. Clinical practicums are provided in the laboratories of St. Joseph's/Candler Health 
System, the South Atlantic Red Cross Blood Center, Memorial Medical Center, and Tuttle Army 
Health Clinic, all located in Savannah; Bulloch Memorial Hospital in Statesboro; and Effingham 
Hospital in Springfield. Upon completion of the program, graduates are eligible to take the 
certification examination of the Board of Registry for Medical Technologists of the American 
Society of Clinical Pathologists, and the clinical laboratory scientist examination of the National 
Certification Agency for Medical Laboratory Personnel. 

Special Programs 

The post-baccalaureate certificate is awarded to those who have completed a degree in biology, 
chemistry, microbiology, or related sciences, and to transient students from other institutions 
affiliated with the program which award the bachelor of science degree. Applicants not wishing 
to earn a second baccalaureate degree must meet NAACT.S academic prerequisites for medical 
technology. These students will receive a certificate upon completion of the professional course 
work. 

Admission Requirements 

The professional phase of the medical technology curriculum begins in the fall semester every 
year. Students desiring acceptance to the program in medical technology should make application 
to the department before April 1 for the August class. 

Currently enrolled Armstrong Atlantic State University students must also meet the require- 
ments for admission to the medical technology program and apply separately to the department. 
Transfer students must be accepted to the university with regular admission status. Certified 
associate degree medical laboratory technicians may receive transfer credit for junior level 
medical technology courses upon presentation of acceptable certification scores and/or transfer 
credit, and satisfactory completion of written and/or practical examinations in the professional 
content areas. 

If not currently enrolled at Armstrong Atlantic, students must be accepted into the university 
with regular admission status. In addition, students should complete an application to the medical 
technology department, and have official transcripts, any certification scores, and two letters of 
reference sent to the department head. (Score and reference forms are available from the 
department.) A select number of applicants meeting the minimum admission requirements will be 
invited for interviews with the departmental admission committee. All applicants will be notified 
by letter of their application status. 

Minimum admission requirements are as follows: 

• SAT of at least 830 with 400 or more in math and 430 or more in verbal 

• Cumulative grade point average of 2.2 or more 

• Completion of required chemistry and biology courses prior to the senior year 

• Average of 2.25 or better in science courses (biology and chemistry), and no more than one 
such course with a grade of D 

• Satisfactory completion of Regents' Test 

Special Requirements 

Current Course Work. Per NAACLS requirement, all applicants must have taken the organic 
or biochemistry course and the microbiology course within the past seven years. Updating course 
work can be done by completing (with a grade of C or better) the appropriate course, or by passing 
a challenge examination. 

Health and Insurance. All students accepted into the academic program are required to 
submit complete health history forms, evidence of health insurance, and evidence of liability 
(malpractice) insurance prior to participation in clinical experiences. 



138 ARMSTRONG ATLANTIC STATE UNIVERSITY 



Transportation. Students are responsible for their own transportation to and from the clinical 
sites and are required to adhere to arranged hospital time schedules. Current requirements may be 
found in the latest medical technology application brochure. 

Progress Requirements 

Students must earn a C or better in each medical technology course. A student may repeat a 
single medical technology course only one time (at the next offering, provided space is available). 
Students who fail to earn a C or better in a repeated medical technology course, or who fail to earn 
a C in a subsequent medical technology course, will be dismissed from the program with no 
possibility of readmission. 

Students must maintain an overall adjusted grade point average of 2.0 or higher. A student who 
falls below this will be placed on suspension from the program for one semester. If the student's 
grade point average is not raised by the end of the next semester, the student will be dismissed from 
the program. 

Students must complete the professional course work within three consecutive years from the 
date of initial admission to the medical technology degree program. 

PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN 
MEDICAL TECHNOLOGY 

A. General Requirements (Core Areas A, B, C, D.2.A., and E) 42 hours 

Core Area F 18 hours 

BIOL 1 107 - Principles of Biology I 

CHEM 1211 - Principles of Chemistry I* 
CHEM 1212 - Principles of Chemistry II* 
CHEM 2101 - Organic Chemistry I 
One course from the following electives: 

BIOL 2081 - Human Anatomy and Physiology I 

BIOL 2082 - Human Anatomy and Physiology II 
Other approved courses (e.g., biology, chemistry, computer science) 
*If taken in area D, substitute elective from area F. 
Physical Education 3 hours 

B. Major Field Courses 52 hours 

MEDT 3000 - Introduction to Medical Laboratory Science 

MEDT 3001 - Introduction to Medical Laboratory Methods 

MEDT 3100 - Urinalysis and Body Fluids 

MEDT 3200 - Clinical Microbiology 

MEDT 3300 - Clinical Hematology and Hemostasis 

MEDT 3400 - Clinical Immunohematology 

MEDT 3501 - Clinical Chemistry I 

MEDT 3502 - Clinical Chemistry II 

MEDT 3600 - Clinical Instrumentation 

MEDT 3700 - Clinical Immunoserology 

MEDT 3800 - Clinical Parasitology 

MEDT 3900 - Clinical Mycology and Virology 

MEDT 41 10 - Phlebotomy Practicum 

MEDT 4210 - Clinical Microbiology Practicum 

MEDT 4310 - Clinical Hematology Practicum 

MEDT 4410 - Clinical Immunohematology Practicum 

MEDT 4510 - Clinical Chemistry Practicum 

MEDT 4600 - Senior Seminar 

MEDT 4610 - Urinalysis Practicum 

MEDT 4710 - Clinical Immunoserology Practicum 



COLLEGE OF HEALTH PROFESSIONS 139 



MEDT 4810 - Special Topics Practicum 

MEDT 4900 - Laboratory Management and Education 

C. Related Field Courses 8 hours 

BIOL 2010 - Microbiology 

CHEM 121 1L - Principles of Chemistry Lab I* 

CHEM 1212L - Principles of Chemistry Lab II* 

HLPR 2000 - Research in the Health Professions 

* Lab credit from area F. If completed in area D, substitute courses approved by department 

head. 



Total Semester Hours 123 hours 

D. Regents' Test and Exit Exam 

NURSING 

Faculty 

Sue Young, Department Head and Graduate Nursing Program Coordinator 

Carole Massey, Undergraduate Nursing Program Coordinator 

Marilyn Buck Bonnie Neuman 

Eva Caldwell Catharine Powell 

Sandra Clark Ethel Pruden 

Sara Connor Nancy Reilly 

Marian Conway James Repella 

Deanna Cross Rosalyn Roesel 

Barbara Dunn Elaine Silcox 

Marcella Hart Camille Stern 

Carola Keller Helen Taggart 

Mary Miller Jane Williamson 

Accreditation Statement 

The program in nursing is approved by the Georgia Board of Nursing and is fully accredited 
by the National League for Nursing Accrediting Commission (NLNAC), 61 Broadway, New 
York, NY 10006, Phone 212/363-5555, ext. 153. 

General Information 

The baccalaureate nursing program offers entering freshmen and transfer students the 
opportunity to earn a bachelor of science in nursing (BSN) degree. The American Nurses 
Association (ANA) and the National League for Nursing (NLN) have adopted a position statement 
calling for the baccalaureate degree in nursing as the academic preparation for professional 
nursing practice. Graduates are prepared to provide comprehensive nursing care for people in a 
variety of settings. The baccalaureate degree also provides the foundation for graduate education 
in nursing. Graduates must meet all legal requirements for licensure as established by the State 
Board of Nursing in order to be eligible to take the National Council Licensure Examination 
(NCLEX-RN) for licensure as a registered nurse (RN). 

Special Programs 

RN Options Program — Post-Licensure. This innovative program is designed for registered 
nurses who wish to pursue the bachelor's and/or master's degrees in nursing. Students take a 
common sequence of courses before they select their degree option. If students select the master 



140 ARMSTRONG ATLANTIC STATE UNIVERSITY 



of science option, the BSN degree is awarded concurrently upon completion of graduate degree 
requirements. Graduate track options include adult clinical nurse specialist, adult nurse practitioner, 
or nursing administration. The program of study is designed to meet the needs of the registered 
nurse whose dedication to life-long learning demands the attainment of formal advanced 
education. This preparation is provided by experienced, dedicated faculty in a scholarly atmosphere 
permitting students to interact regularly with leaders in nursing. Full and part-time study is 
available. 

The Georgia RN-BSN Articulation Model: Advanced Placement through Validation of 
Previous Learning. Armstrong Atlantic State University participates in the Georgia RN-BSN 
Articulation Model for RNs. Twenty-nine hours of previously earned nursing credit will be 
applied toward the baccalaureate degree after successful completion of six RN Options credit 
hours. Credit is awarded based on the fulfillment of applicable requirements as listed below: 

All Associate Degree Nursing (ADN) and Diploma Graduates of Nursing Programs in 
Georgia or NLN Accredited Programs in USA Outside Georgia: 

Fewer than four years after graduation with more than 

1000 clinical practice hours in previous three years no testing required 

Four or more years after graduation with more than 

1000 clinical practice hours in previous three years written validation 

of clinical practice 
required (no testing) 
Fewer than four years after graduation with fewer than 

1000 clinical practice hours in previous three years NMP II test required 

All ADN and Diploma Graduates of Non-NLNAC Accredited Programs Outside Georgia: 

NLN Mobility Profile (NMP) II Test is required. The NMP II consists of three exams that 
validate twenty-nine hours of general nursing knowledge in the care of the adult client, the 
childbearing client and child, and the client with mental disorders. The exams are administered 
every semester. NMP II information and applications are available in the departmental office. 

Admission Requirements 

Pre-Licensure. See "Limits on Admission" in the College of Health Professions section of this 
catalog. Applicants to the program must be regularly admitted to Armstrong Atlantic State 
University prior to making application to the nursing major. Students also must meet the 
admission requirements of the baccalaureate nursing program to be eligible for admission to the 
nursing major. Admission decisions are made by the nursing faculty. 

It should be noted that the pool of applicants has increased in quality and quantity, and that 
admission to the nursing major is competitive. Minimum requirements to be admitted include a 
grade of C or better in each science course, and a minimum adjusted grade point average of 2.5 
in all prerequisite course work attempted. However, meeting minimum requirements does not 
guarantee admission to the nursing major. Those applicants who, in the judgement of the nursing 
faculty, present the strongest academic record and show the most promise of success in the nursing 
major will be accepted. In making comparisons between applicants, the nursing faculty evaluates 
the academic record of each applicant thoroughly, including an evaluation of science grades, 
adjusted grade point average, number of hours completed at Armstrong Atlantic, and Regents' 
Test status. Students who are licensed in another health field must show a current license for 
validation. Students are expected to comply with the core performance standards for nursing listed 
on the application form. 

Transfer applicants and those with degrees in other fields must meet the criteria established for 
admission to the nursing major. Transfer credit will be awarded depending upon equivalency of 
courses. Those decisions will be made by the nursing faculty using actual syllabi, course outlines, 
descriptions, and the like, supplied by the transfer student. 

Application to the nursing major must be submitted by the published deadline. (Consult the 
departmental office for details.) Only completed applications will be considered. Students will be 
admitted to the nursing major during the fall semester of their sophomore year. Students who are 



COLLEGE OF HEALTH PROFESSIONS 141 



not admitted may reapply for the next year. Complete information regarding admission proce- 
dures is available in the Department of Nursing. 

See also "Special Requirements" below. 

RN Options Program. Students seeking admittance to this program must obtain regular 
admission to Armstrong Atlantic State University. Also required are the following items: 

• Completed RN Options application form 

• Grade of C or better in each science course 

• Minimum adjusted grade point average of 2.5 on all prerequisite course work attempted 

• Current professional Georgia nursing license 

Admitted students must meet specific criteria and complete prerequisite courses before they 
are eligible to enroll in nursing major courses. The BSN Option requires completion of RN 
Options Courses, submission of a letter of intent at least one semester before entering the BSN 
Option, and completion of nursing sequence within four years of enrollment in the RN Options 
courses. 

Special Requirements 

Legal. The Georgia Board of Nursing has the authority to refuse to grant a license to an 
applicant upon a finding by the board that the applicant has been convicted of any felony, crime 
involving moral turpitude, or crime violating a federal or state law relating to controlled 
substances or dangerous drugs in the courts of this state, any other state, territory, or country, or 
in the courts of the United States, including but not limited to a plea of nolo contendere entered 
to the charge. Unlicensed students may be employed only as unlicensed, nursing personnel. They 
may not represent themselves or practice as nursing students except as part of a scheduled clinical 
learning activity in the curriculum. Students must meet all legal requirements for licensure. 

Health and Insurance. Admitted students must submit complete health histories, evidence of 
health insurance, and evidence of liability (malpractice) insurance prior to fall semester. 

CPR. Admitted students must submit proof of CPR certification prior to fall semester. 

Progress Requirements 

Students are responsible for reading and abiding by the policies in the Baccalaureate Nursing 
Program Student Handbook, including the core performance standards. 

Students must complete the baccalaureate nursing program within four consecutive years from 
the date of their initial admission to the nursing major. Students who do not complete the program 
within this time limit must apply for readmission, meet current criteria for admission, and have 
their previous credits evaluated. Students who are granted readmission must meet course 
requirements in effect at the time of readmission. Any student not matriculating each semester, 
excluding summer semester, must apply for readmission to the program. 

The following must be maintained to continue in the nursing program: 

• Grades of C or better in each science course (see College of Health Professions policy 
regarding repeat of science courses) 

• Grades of C or better in each nursing course 

• Overall grade point average of 2.0 

• On an annual, up-to-date basis: health history; tuberculin test or proof of negative chest x-ray; 
immunizations; CPR certification; liability insurance; health insurance. (Additional institu- 
tional requirements may exist or may change over time, depending on clinical agency policy.) 
Students earning a grade lower than C in a nursing course must apply for readmission to the 

nursing major. If readmitted, students may repeat the course at its next offering, on a space 
available basis. A repeated course may be taken concurrently with a nonsequential course. No 
more than one nursing course may be repeated. 

All students must pass the Regents' Test prior to entering the last semester before graduation, 
and senior nursing students are required to take a written comprehensive exam prior to graduation. 

Failure to comply with any of the above requirements while in the nursing program constitutes 
grounds for dismissal from the program. 



142 ARMSTRONG ATLANTIC STATE UNIVERSITY 



Readmission Requirements 

Students seeking readmission must complete the readmission application for both the univer- 
sity and the nursing major. Students are required to meet admission and curriculum requirements 
in effect at the time of readmission. Readmission decisions are made by the nursing faculty, based 
upon space available and recommendation by the admission and retention progression committee. 
Prior to the semester of re-entry, readmitted students must submit a current health history, proof 
of a negative tuberculin test or chest x-ray, immunization record, CPR certification, and evidence 
of health and liability insurance. 

PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN 
NURSING — PRE-LICENSURE STUDENTS 

A. General Requirements (Core Areas, A, B, C, D. 2.B., and E) 42 hours 

Core Area F 18 hours 

BIOL 2081 - Human Anatomy and Physiology I 

BIOL 2082 - Human Anatomy and Physiology II 
BIOL 2210 - Microorganisms and Disease 
Two courses selected from: 

PSYC 1101 - General Psychology 

PSYC 2950 - Developmental Psychology 

SOCI 1101 - Introductory Sociology 
Physical Education 3 hours 

B. Major Field Courses 57 hours 

NURS 2241 - Nursing and Health Promotion I 

NURS 2260 - Health Policy in Nursing Practice 

NURS 3242 - Nursing and Health Promotion II 

NURS 3301 - Nursing Skills I 

NURS 3302 - Nursing Skills II 

NURS 3320 - Health Assessment of the Well Individual 

NURS 3330 - Leadership in Nursing Care 

NURS 3340 - Family Health Promotion 

NURS 3350 - Health Promotion of Women and Children 

NURS 3360 - Health Maintenance and Rehabilitation 

NURS 3550 - Pathophysiology 

NURS 4420 - Nursing and Health Restoration 

NURS 4430 - Health Restoration in Mental Health 

NURS 4440 - Population Focused Nursing 

NURS 4450 - Professional Nursing Practicum 

NURS 4460 - Professional Nursing Seminar 

C. Related Field Courses 7 hours 

HLPR 1200 - Multidisciplinary Skills in Health Professions 

HLPR 2000 - Introduction to Research in the Health Professions 
HLPR 4200 - Interdisciplinary Health Professions Seminar 

Total Semester Hours 127 hours 

D. Regents' Test and Exit Exam 



COLLEGE OF HEALTH PROFESSIONS 143 



PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN 
NURSING, RN OPTIONS PROGRAM — POST-LICENSURE STUDENTS 

A. General Requirements (Core Areas, A, B, C, D.2.B., and E) 42 hours 

Core Area F 18 hours 

BIOL 2081 - Human Anatomy and Physiology I 

BIOL 2082 - Human Anatomy and Physiology II 
BIOL 2210 - Microorganisms and Disease 
Two courses selected from: 

PSYC 1101 - General Psychology 

PSYC 2950 - Developmental Psychology 

SOCI 1101 - Introductory Sociology 
Physical Education 3 hours 

B. Major Field Courses 57 hours 

NURS 3000 - Professional Role Transitions: Socialization 

NURS 3150 - Professional Role Transitions: Communication 

NURS 3301 - Nursing Skills I* 

NURS 3302 - Nursing Skills II* 

NURS 3300 - Health Assessment for the Promotion of Wellness 

NURS 3310 - Nursing and Health Promotion Throughout the Lifespan 

NURS 3450 - Health Care and Families 

NURS 3350 - Health Promotion of Women and Children* 

NURS 3360 - Health Maintenance and Rehabilitation* 

NURS 3550 - Pathophysiology 

NURS 4420 - Nursing and Health Restoration* 

NURS 4430 - Health Restoration in Mental Health* 

NURS 4470 - Nursing and Population Focused Practice 

NURS 4480 - Professional Nursing Practicum 

C. Related Field Courses 7 hours 

HLPR 1200 - Multidisciplinary Skills in Health Professions* 

HLPR 2000 - Introduction to Rearch in the Health Professions 
HLPR 4200 - Interdisciplinary Health Professions Seminar 



Total Semester Hours 127 hours 

* In accordance with the Georgia RN-BSN Articulation Model (Advanced Placement Valida- 
tion of Previous Learning), credit will be awarded after successful completion of six (6) R.N. 
Options credit hours. These courses are identified with an asterisk. 
D. Regents' Test and Exit Exam 

PHYSICAL THERAPY 

Faculty 

David Lake, Department Head 

Anne Thompson, Academic Coordinator of Clinical Education 
Jody Andersen Andi Beth Mincer 

Jennifer Lander Debbie Tucker 

Accreditation Statement 

The Department of Physical Therapy is accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of 
Physical Therapy Education. The program received initial accreditation in spring of 1997. 

General Information 

Students enrolled in the Department of Physical Therapy graduate with the master of science 
degree, but may also be awarded simultaneously a bachelor of science in physical therapy. 



144 ARMSTRONG ATLANTIC STATE UNIVERSITY 



Students may enter the program either as graduate students or senior undergraduates (see 
below). 

Based upon scientific knowledge and principles, professional practitioners evaluate, diagnose, 
treat, and instruct people of all ages with movement disorders. Evaluation, diagnosis, and 
treatment planning require the ability to analyze a large number of factors, determine the most 
important, and develop a treatment plan based on that analysis. Physical therapists must 
effectively communicate their findings to clients, clients' families, other health care providers, 
and agencies that reimburse clients or physical therapists for services. Physical therapists must 
provide care in a compassionate, competent, legal, and ethical manner. Physical therapists must 
communicate plans for the prevention of injuries and disabilities, and work cooperatively and 
respectfully with both clients and other health care professionals. 

All course work in this program is clinical case-centered with the emphasis on problem 
identification and problem solving. This allows students to integrate pathophysiology, evaluation 
methods, treatment approaches, and psychosocial principles into each case. Working in small 
groups, students are encouraged to seek new solutions to clinical problems, propose new treatment 
approaches, and develop teamwork and leadership skills. Clinical experiences are designed to 
foster competency and professionalism. 

Graduates. Students who are admitted to the physical therapy program as graduate students 
will receive the master of science degree upon graduation. Sixty-five to eighty percent of students 
who are admitted to the program in physical therapy have already completed an undergraduate 
degree. 

Students must complete the entire program for the master of science degree before sitting for 
the National Physical Therapy Examination (NPTE) and qualifying for licensure. 

Undergraduates. Students admitted to the physical therapy program as undergraduates must 
meet all core and program requirements for an undergraduate degree at Armstrong Atlantic State 
University, and achieve certain scores on the graduate record examination (GRE) prior to 
admission to the program. Upon completion of the first two semesters of the physical therapy 
professional courses (PHTH prefix), students will be admitted into the graduate school. Upon 
completion of the entire program, students will be awarded the bachelor of science in physical 
therapy and the master of science degrees. Armstrong Atlantic State University does not award 
a separate undergraduate degree in physical therapy, and the bachelor of science degree is awarded 
only to students who have completed the entire master of science degree program. 

Enrollment in one of the three pre-physical therapy options allows undergraduate students to 
choose the most appropriate track for their particular needs, but does not guarantee admission to 
the physical therapy major. 

Pre-Physical Therapy Track in the Biology Major. Students take university and biology 
core courses as well as courses meeting prerequisites of the physical therapy program. If accepted 
into the physical therapy program, students in this track complete the first two semesters of work 
in physical therapy as part of the requirements for a bachelor of science degree in biology. If not 
accepted, students may complete their senior year in one of the other biology tracks and graduate 
with the bachelor of science degree in biology. This track is recommended for students whose 
interests lie in the basic sciences. 

Pre-Physical Therapy Track in the Health Science Major. Students take university and 
health science core courses as well as prerequisites for physical therapy. If accepted into the 
physical therapy program, students complete the first two semesters of work in the physical 
therapy program as part of the requirements for a bachelor of health science degree. If not 
accepted, students may complete their senior year in one of the other tracks in health science and 
graduate with the bachelor of health science degree. This track is recommended for students whose 
interests lie in health promotion or health administration. 

Pre-Physical Therapy Major in the Department of Physical Therapy. Participants in this 
major take the university and physical therapy core courses as well as prerequisite and elective 
courses required by the physical therapy program. If accepted into the physical therapy program, 
students complete the first two semesters of work in the physical therapy program as part of the 
requirements for a bachelor of science degree in physical therapy. Note, however, that the bachelor 
of science degree is not awarded until completion of requirements for the master of science degree. 



COLLEGE OF HEALTH PROFESSIONS 145 



If not accepted into the physical therapy program, students must transfer to another major in a 
different department. This option is recommended only for non-degreed transfer students whose 
academic records do not lend themselves to either of the other two options. 

Admission Requirements 

See "Limits on Admission" in the College of Health Professions section of this catalog. 
Students must be admitted to Armstrong Atlantic State University prior to enrolling in the physical 
therapy program. Students must meet departmental admission requirements for the physical 
therapy major. 

Decisions on admission to the physical therapy program are made by the physical therapy 
faculty. Enrollment as a pre-physical therapy major at Armstrong Atlantic State University does 
not guarantee admission to the physical therapy major. Meeting the minimum criteria for 
application does not guarantee admission to the physical therapy major. The pool of applicants for 
the physical therapy program includes many highly qualified applicants, and the number of 
available positions is limited. Physical therapy faculty will evaluate candidates based on evidence 
that they possess knowledge and understanding of the following: 

• effective oral and written communication skills 

• physical sciences 

• functional and structural characteristics of all human body systems 

• individual and group human behavior 

• political process at different levels 

• the scope of physical therapy practice 

• computers and computer software applications 

• basic statistics 

• basic research methodology and research design 

Consideration will also be given to student involvement in extracurricular activities and 
community service. 

Minimum satisfaction of application criteria consists of the following: 

• completion of two terms of basic chemistry with labs and two terms of basic physics with labs 
(must include mechanics, electricity, magnetism, and light) 

• two terms of anatomy and physiology with labs, completed in a basic science department 

• minimum grade point average of 2.75 on courses in science (two in anatomy and physiology, 
two in general chemistry, two in general physics). No science grade of D or F is acceptable, 
and no more than one science course may be repeated. 

• Graduate Record Exam (GRE) scores of 450 verbal and 450 quantitative at the time of 
application for regular admission to the School of Graduate Studies (scores of 400 verbal and 
400 quantitative required for provisional admission) 

Applicants must have volunteer or work experience in a physical therapy setting. Exposure to 
several different physical therapy settings is recommended. 

Applicants must obtain the most recent information and application packets from the Depart- 
ment of Physical Therapy or the School of Graduate Studies. The information packets are updated 
annually to include any changes in the program. Information in the packet supersedes that 
contained in this catalog. New information packets are available in April of the year preceding the 
application deadline (for example: for admission in 2001, the information packets are available 
in April, 2000). The application packets contain both physical therapy and university admission 
applications. Deadline for application is January 15 of ever)' year, for matriculation in the fall 
semester of that year. 

Transfer applicants wishing to complete a bachelor's degree and pre-physical therapy majors 
at Armstrong Atlantic State University must complete the core curriculum (see requirements 
elsewhere in this catalog) and pass the Regents' Test before beginning physical therapy courses 



146 ARMSTRONG ATLANTIC STATE UNIVERSITY 



Transfer credit for prerequisite courses may be accepted for required core courses if approved by 
the physical therapy faculty, the Armstrong Atlantic department in which the course is taught, and 
the office of the registrar. 

After admission to the physical therapy program, students must submit a formal acceptance 
and a non-refundable $250.00 deposit to retain their places in the physical therapy program. These 
deposits are applied to the students' first semester matriculation fees. 

Special Requirements 

Legal. Graduation from an accredited professional physical therapy education program allows 
students to take the National Physical Therapy Examination (NPTE). Passing this exam is 
required for licensure in any jurisdiction within the United States and its territories. The Georgia 
Board of Physical Therapy has the authority to refuse or revoke licensure to an applicant upon a 
finding by the board that the applicant has been convicted of any felony, crime involving moral 
turpitude, or crime violating any state, federal, or comparable jurisdictional law including laws 
relating to controlled substances or dangerous drugs. This applies to any conviction or pleas of 
nolo contendere entered to charges in the courts of this state, any other state, territory, or country, 
or in the federal courts of the United States. 

Health and Insurance. All students in the physical therapy program are required to undergo 
physical exams, keep immunizations current, and provide evidence of health and liability 
(malpractice) insurance. 

CPR. Admitted students must provide proof of certification in adult CPR and first aid. 

Progress Requirements 

Students must complete the physical therapy program within four consecutive years from the 
date of their initial admission to the physical therapy major. Students who do not complete the 
program in the required period of time may apply for readmission. Readmission decisions are 
made on a space-available basis. Former students must meet the current criteria for admission and 
be evaluated along with the other applicants to the program. 

Students must be continuously enrolled in the program through the entire seven-semester 
sequence of courses. Leave may be granted but will require that the student "drop back" to the next 
graduating class. Students may obtain faculty permission to "drop back" for academic, medical, 
or personal reasons. Students may re-enroll in PHTH courses only if faculty members have 
determined that space is available. 

Students must earn a B or better in all PHTH courses. If lower than the required grade is earned 
in a PHTH course, that course must be repeated. Only one course can be repeated, and that course 
can be repeated only once. A course can be repeated only when it is normally offered again in the 
curricular sequence. No additional courses can be taken in the physical therapy curriculum until 
the course deficiency is satisfied. Thus, failure to pass a course will require the student to "drop 
back" to the next graduating class. 

Failure to earn a grade of B or better in two or more PHTH courses will result in dismissal from 
the program. Failure to earn a grade of B or better on the second attempt of a PHTH course will 
also result in dismissal from the program. Students dismissed from the program because of 
inability to meet grade requirements are not eligible to apply for readmission. 

Readmission Requirements 

Students must complete readmission applications for both Armstrong Atlantic State Univer- 
sity and the physical therapy major, and will be required to meet admission and curriculum 
requirements in effect at the time of application for readmission. Readmission decisions will be 
based upon space available and recommendation of department faculty. Students dismissed from 
the physical therapy program for any reason whatever are not eligible to apply for readmission. 



COLLEGE OF HEALTH PROFESSIONS 147 

PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN 
PHYSICAL THERAPY (Pre-Physical Therapy Track) 

A. General Requirements (Core Areas, A, B, C, D.2.A., and E) 42 hours 

Core Area F 18 hours 

BIOL 2081 - Human Anatomy and Physiology I 

BIOL 2082 - Human Anatomy and Physiology II 

PHYS 1 1 1 1/1 1 1 1L - Introductory Physics I 

PHYS 1112/11 12L - Introductory Physics II 

Elective credits from areas A-E 

Physical Education 3 hours 

B. Related Field Courses 5-8 hours 

PSYC 1101 - General Psychology t 

HLPR 2000 - Introduction to Health Care 

CSCI 1050 - Introduction to Computer Concepts and Applications 

f If not taken in area E 

C. Field Area Electives 16-19 hours 

Eight (8) semester hours (maximum) of natural/social science electives at 

1000-2000 level. Must include PHYS 1111/1112 with labs, CHEM 
1211/1212 with labs, and/or BIOL 2081/2082 with labs if not taken in 
core areas D or F. 
Eight (8) semester hours (minimum) of natural/social science electives 
at 3000-4000 level. 

D. Professional Physical Therapy Program* 36 hours 

PHTH 5101U - Functional and Structural Aspects of Movement I 

PHTH 5131U - Foundations of Physical Therapy Assessment and Treatment I 

PHTH 5161U - Physical Therapy Practice Issues I 

PHTH 5181U - Clinical Practicum I 

PHTH 5202U - Functional and Structural Aspects of Movement II 

PHTH 5232U - Foundations of Physical Therapy Assessment and Treatment II 

PHTH 5262U - Physical Therapy Practice Issues II 

PHTH 5282U - Clinical Practicum II 

PHTH 5290U - Physical Therapy Case Management 

* Taken only after acceptance to the physical therapy professional program 



Total Semester Hours 123 hours 

E. Regents' Test and Exit Exams 

All undergraduate applicants to the physical therapy program must satisfy all Regents' 
requirements before matriculation in the professional curriculum. All students completing the 
bachelor of science degree as part of the professional curriculum must take the academic 
profile examination before receiving the bachelor's degree. To be eligible to take the National 
Physical Therapy Examination (NPTE), students must complete the master of science degree 
in physical therapy. The bachelor of science degree is only a preparation for the professional 
program. 



148 ARMSTRONG ATLANTIC STATE UNIVERSITY 



RADIOLOGIC SCIENCES 

Faculty 

Sharyn Gibson, Department Head 

Elwin Tilson, Clinical Coordinator 

Mary Lou DeMarco, Program Director, Radiation Therapy 

Deborah Lamb 

Gloria Strickland 

Accreditation Statement 

The radiologic technology program is accredited by the Joint Review Committee on Education 
in Radiologic Technology for the period 1984-1999. 

General Information 

The Department of Radiologic Sciences offers a bachelor of science degree in radiologic 
technologies, with tracks in radiation therapy and radiography. Both are highly technological 
health care professions with significant patient contact. Radiation therapists work with physicians 
to plan and deliver radiation therapy treatments, with a primary responsibility for accurate 
evaluation and effective communication with patients. Radiographers use radiation, magnetism, 
and computers in the production of diagnostic medical images. Radiography is also the traditional 
gateway into ultrasound and nuclear medicine. Advanced-level practitioners perform in special- 
ized areas such as mammography, MRI, CT, cardiovascular intervention, dosimetry, education, 
and quality management. The department also offers a post-baccalaureate certificate program. 

The department provides a comprehensive education to ensure that students will enter the 
radiologic professions as highly competent, caring practitioners, dedicated to teamwork, research, 
community service, professionalism, and life-long learning. Traditional teaching methods and 
innovative instructional technology are used to encourage students to develop critical thinking and 
problem-solving skills. 

Admission Requirements 

Baccalaureate degree programs begin in the summer of each year; however, RTs pursuing the 
baccalaureate degree or post-baccalaureate certification may begin any semester. Department 
faculty will advise anyone interested in majoring in radiologic sciences. Admission to the 
professional component of the baccalaureate degree program is competitive. Admission to the 
bridge program for registered radiologic technologists is not competitive. Detailed procedures and 
guidelines for program admission should be obtained by contacting the Department of Radiologi- 
cal Sciences. The following guidelines are provided for general information only. 

Non-RTs. Must have regular admission to Armstrong Atlantic and a grade point average of 
2.3 or higher for all college work. 

Prior to the beginning of the program the following must be successfully completed: 

• Fifty semester hours of degree requirements 

• Human Anatomy and Physiology I and II or equivalent 

• Lab science sequence (chemistry or physics) 

• CPC requirements 

• Regents' Test 

Baccalaureate Degree Program (Bridge) for RTs. Requirements are regular admission to 
Armstrong Atlantic, grade point average of 2.3 or higher for all college work, and certification in 
radiography (if not yet certified, must become certified prior to the end of the first semester at 
Armstrong Atlantic). Before beginning any of the professional courses, the following must be 
successfully completed: 

• At least 45 semester hours of degree requirements 

• Anatomy and Physiology I and II or equivalent 

• CPC requirements 

• Two college English courses and one college algebra course 



COLLEGE OF HEALTH PROFESSIONS 149 

Post-Baccalaureate Certificate Program in Radiation Therapy. Applicants must have 
regular admission to Armstrong Atlantic, a grade point average of 2.3 or higher for all college 
work, and a baccalaureate degree in radiologic technology with an emphasis in radiography. If not 
yet certified in radiography, students must become certified before the end of the first semester 
at Armstrong Atlantic. 

After admission to the Department of Radiologic Sciences, students must pay a $50.00 non- 
refundable deposit to reserve a seat in the program. Deposits are applied to students' first semester 
matriculation fees. 

Special Requirements 

Health and Insurance. Prior to matriculation in clinical education courses, students are 
required to submit evidence of liability (malpractice) insurance, health insurance, and a physical 
examination. Specific information regarding these requirements will be distributed to admitted 
students. 

CPR. Students must show proof of certification in CPR before participating in clinical 
experiences. 

ACLS Certification. Students are required to earn this during the last radiography clinical 
education course. 

Transportation. Students are responsible for providing their own transportation to the 
hospitals for clinical education courses. 

Readmission Requirements 

Students who have been admitted to and have enrolled in the programs in radiologic sciences, 
but who have either withdrawn or been dismissed without prejudice from the program, may apply 
for readmission to the program only if they have a cumulative college grade point average of 2.0 
at the time they wish to reenter. Readmission decisions will be based upon space availability and 
recommendation by the radiologic sciences admissions committee. 

PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN 
RADIOLOGIC TECHNOLOGIES 

A. General Requirements (Core Areas A, B, C, D.2.B., and E) 42 hours 

Core Area F 18 hours 

BIOL 2081 - Human Anatomy and Physiology I 

BIOL 2082 - Human Anatomy and Physiology II 

MATH1113-Pre-Calculus 

Approved Elective 

One of the following (if chemistry sequence completed in area D): 

PHSC 121 1/121 1L - Physical Environment and Lab 

PHYS 1 1 1 1/1 1 1 1L - Introductory Physics I and Lab I 
Physical Education 3 hours 

B. Major Field Courses 36 hours 

HLPR 2000 - Research in Health Professions 

BIOL 2215 - Human Physiology and Disease 

HLPR 4200 - Interdisciplinary Health Professions Seminar 

RADS 3000 - Introduction to Radiologic Sciences 

RADS 3050 - Patient Care and Interactions 

RADS 3060 - Principles of Image Formation and Evaluation 

RADS 307 1 - Radiographic Procedures I 

RADS 3090 - Introduction to Radiation Physics 

RADS 3150 - Radiobiology and Radiation Protection 

RADS 4410 - Cross Sectional Anatomy 

RADS 4430 - Professional Practice Seminar 

RADS 4450 - Radiology Management & Leadership 



150 ARMSTRONG ATLANTIC STATE UNIVERSITY 



Radiography Track 30 hours 

RADS 3072 - Radiographic Procedures II 

RADS 3073 - Radiographic Procedures III 

RADS 3161 - Clinical Education I 

RADS 3162 - Clinical Education II 

RADS 4050 - Quality Management in Radiography 

RADS 4090 - Radiographic Physics 

RADS 41 10 - Advanced Imaging 

RADS 4163 - Clinical Education III 

RADS 4164 - Clinical Education IV 

RADS 4165 - Clinical Education V 



Total Semester Hours for Radiography Track 129 hours 

Radiation Therapy Track 30 hours 

RADS 3190 - Principles of Radiation Therapy 

RADS 3301 - Clinical Education I 

RADS 3302 - Clinical Education II 

RADS 4201 - Radiation Oncology I 

RADS 4202 - Radiation Oncology II 

RADS 4240 - Radiation Therapy Physics 

RADS 4260 - Treatment Planning 

RADS 4280 - Quality Management in Radiation Therapy 

RADS 4303 - Clinical Education III 

RADS 4304 - Clinical Education IV 

RADS 4305 - Clinical Education V 



Total Semester Hours for Radiation Therapy Track 126 hours 

C. Regents' Test and Exit Exam 

CURRICULUM FOR THE POST-BACCALAUREATE CERTIFICATE 
PROGRAM 

Professional Courses: 

RADS 3 1 80 - Foundations of Radiation Therapy 

RADS 3190 - Principles of Radiation Therapy 

RADS 4201 - Radiation Oncology I 

RADS 4202 - Radiation Oncology II 

RADS 4240 - Radiation Therapy Physics 

RADS 4260 - Treatment Planning 

RADS 4280 - Quality Management in RadiationTherapy 

RADS 3302 - Clinical Education II 

RADS 4303 - Clinical Education III 

RADS 4304 - Clinical Education IV 

RADS 4305 - Clinical Education V 



Total Semester Hours 31 hours 

RESPIRATORY THERAPY 

Faculty 

Ross Bowers, Department Head 

William Smith, Director of Clinical Education 

Accreditation Statement 

The department is accredited by the Committee on Accreditation of Allied Health Educational 
Programs (CAAHEP) for the period 1997-2002. 



COLLEGE OF HEALTH PROFESSIONS 151 



General Information 

The Department of Respiratory Therapy offers a four-year program leading to the bachelor of 
science degree in respiratory therapy, as well as a career-ladder program for those already 
registered as respiratory therapists to obtain their undergraduate degree. A bachelor' s degree from 
an accredited respiratory therapy program qualifies graduates for entry into the advanced 
practitioner credentialing system, leading to the highest professional credential available in the 
field of respiratory therapy. The credentialing process is a two-part, nationally administered 
examination. Part one, a comprehensive written exam, is taken shortly after graduation. Graduates 
who pass this exam will earn the entry level credential "Certified Respiratory Therapist" (CRT), 
and will be eligible to enter the registry credentialing system. Candidates who pass both registry 
exams will earn the credential "Registered Respiratory Therapist" (RRT). The CRT credential is 
required for licensure by the State Board of Medical Examiners. 

Special Programs 

RRT Career-Ladder Program. The Department of Respiratory Therapy has adopted the 
career-ladder model as the basis for accepting RRTs into the baccalaureate program. Registered 
respiratory therapists may advance their education while minimizing duplication of knowledge 
and skills. Other goals of the career-ladder program are to educate individuals who will be able 
to contribute to the growth and development of respiratory care as a profession; educate 
respiratory care providers in a scientific approach to problem-solving and patient care; provide the 
interpersonal and communication skills needed to work effectively as a member of the interdis- 
ciplinary health care team; and foster respect, critical thinking, and a genuine desire for 
knowledge. 

RRTs may receive advanced placement via equivalency credit. (Equivalent credit will be 
awarded individually based on the candidate's academic transcript and professional portfolio.) 
Applicants who graduated more than three years before admission will need to validate current 
practice. 

Admission Requirements 

Baccalaureate Degree Program. See "Limits on Admission" in the College of Health 
Professions section of this catalog. Admission to Armstrong Atlantic State University does not 
guarantee admission to the respiratory therapy program. The department has a separate formal 
admissions process. 

Students are normally admitted to the professional component of the program in the fall. The 
application deadline is April 1 . Applications received after that date will be considered on a space 
available basis. 

Admission to the major is made on a space available basis and is limited to the best qualified 
students as determined by the admissions committee. Candidates who meet the academic criteria 
for admission will be interviewed by the departmental admissions committee. Meeting admission 
criteria does not constitute acceptance into the program. Our maximum enrollment ceiling is 16 
students. Minimum admission criteria include completion of all core requirements for the major, 
an adjusted grade point average of 2.40, no more than one grade less than C in courses related to 
area D or F of the semester core, and successful completion of the Regents' Test. 

RRT Career-Ladder. Candidates for the RRT career-ladder should have an earned associate 
degree in respiratory therapy, RRT credentials, completion of all baccalaureate core courses, a 
cumulative grade point average of at least 2.5, and have completed a professional portfolio. 

Each candidate is responsible for developing a professional portfolio as part of the application 
process. Each portfolio should contain verification of RRT credentials, a notarized copy of the 
associate degree, a resume with complete work history, a current job description, a letter of 
recommendation from an immediate supervisor, verification of current Georgia license, and 
documentation of specialty credentials and in-house certifications. 



152 ARMSTRONG ATLANTIC STATE UNIVERSITY 



Special Requirements 

Legal. The Georgia Board of Medical Examiners has the authority to refuse to grant a license 
to an applicant upon a finding by the board that the applicant has been convicted of any felony, 
a crime involving moral turpitude, or a crime violating a federal or state law relating to controlled 
substances or dangerous drugs. Unlicensed students may be employed as long as they work under 
direct supervision. Graduates must apply for a temporary permit in order to work following 
graduation. In order to attain a full license the applicant must be employed under medical direction 
and have earned a CRT credential. It is a misdemeanor to practice respiratory care or falsely 
represent oneself as a respiratory care professional unless licensed by the board. 

Health and insurance. Students are required to submit a complete health history form and 
evidence of health insurance, immunizations, and liability (malpractice) insurance prior to 
participation in clinical practicums. 

Progress Requirements 

Students must complete the respiratory therapy program within three consecutive academic 
years from the date of initial entry. Students who do not complete the program within this time 
limit must reapply for admission, meet current criteria for admission, and have their previous 
credits evaluated at the time of their subsequent admission. Students who are readmitted must 
meet course requirements in effect at the time of readmission. 

A grade of C or better is required for each course in the major field of study, which includes 
courses without a RESP prefix. A student who earns a grade of less than C must repeat the course 
the next semester it is offered. Students may repeat a course in the major field of study only once. 
Students who must repeat more than one course in the major field of study will be dismissed from 
the program with no option for readmission. Students placed on academic warning who do not 
raise their grade point average to the minimum criteria for academic good standing the following 
semester will be suspended from the program. Courses used to raise the grade point average must 
be approved by the academic advisor. Students suspended from the program are eligible for 
readmission. 

Students are required to pass three nationally standardized exit exams administered during the 
last year. Students who do not pass the exit exams will not receive a certificate of completion from 
the program. 

Readmission Requirements 

Students must complete readmission applications for Armstrong Atlantic State University and 
the respiratory therapy major. Student will be required to meet admission and curriculum 
requirements in effect at the time of readmission, and must complete a comprehensive clinical 
evaluation prior to readmission. Students are responsible for scheduling such evaluations by the 
mid-term date of the semester prior to readmission. Readmission to the respiratory therapy major 
is a faculty decision and will be based on space availability and faculty recommendation. 

PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN 
RESPIRATORY THERAPY 

A. General Requirements (Core Areas A, B, C, D.2.B., and E) 42 hours 

Core Area F 18 hours 

BIOL 2081 - Human Anatomy and Physiology I 

BIOL 2082 - Human Anatomy and Physiology II 

BIOL 2210 - Microorganisms and Disease 

PHYS 1 1 1 1 - Introductory Physics I 

or PHSC 121 1 - Physical Environment 

Approved electives 

Physical Education 3 hours 



COLLEGE OF HEALTH PROFESSIONS 153 



B. Major Field Courses 52 hours 

RESP 31 10 - Patient Assessment 

RESP 3120 - Respiratory Care Equipment 
RESP 3151C - Clinical Practicum I 
RESP 3210 - Clinical Pharmacology 
RESP 3220 - Respiratory Care Fundamentals 
RESP 3230 - Diagnostic Procedures 
RESP 3252C - Clinical Practicum II 
RESP 3310 - Basic Ventilatory Support 
RESP 3320 - Subacute/Home Care 
RESP 3353C - Clinical Practicum III 
RESP 41 10 - Advanced Ventilatory Support 
RESP 4120 - Cardiopulmonary Critical Care 
RESP 4130 - Perinatal Care 
RESP 4154C - Clinical Practicum IV 
RESP 4210 - Cardiopulmonary Medicine 
RESP 4220 - Research in Respiratory Care 
RESP 4230 - Seminar in Respiratory Care 
RESP 4255C - Clinical Practicum V 

C. Related Field Courses 14 hours 

BIOL 3400 - Human Physiology 

HLPR 1 100 - Introduction to Health Care and Medical Terminology 
HLPR 2000 - Introduction to Research in the Health Professions 
HSCA 4610 - Health Care Economics 
HSCA 4640 - Managed Care Concepts 



Total Semester Hours 129 hours 

D. Regents' Test and Exit Exams 



154 ARMSTRONG ATLANTIC STATE UNIVERSITY 

Course Index and Descriptions 

Numbering System for Courses 

In the course listings that follow, there appear three numbers in parentheses after each course 
title. The first number listed indicates the number of hours of lecture; the second number listed 
indicates the number of hour of laboratory (including field placements); the third number listed 
indicates the number of semester hours of credit carried by the course. The letter V represents a 
variable number of hours. 

Courses numbered 0000-0199 carry institutional credit only and may not be applied to a degree 
program. 

Courses numbered 1000-1999 are generally planned for the freshman year; courses numbered 
2000-2999 for the sophomore year; courses numbered 3000-3999 for the junior year; and courses 
numbered 4000-4999 for the senior year. 

Courses numbered 5000-5999U are graduate courses with dual enrollment by undergraduate 
and graduate students. (Permission is not required for undergraduate students.) 

Courses numbered 6000-6999 are graduate courses. (Graduating seniors may enroll by 
permission only.) 

Courses numbered 7000-8999 are graduate courses. (Undergraduate students may not enroll.) 

Lettering System for Courses 

Throughout the catalog, four capital letters followed by four numbers are used to designate 
individual courses. Following is a list of the prefixes (abbreviations) used, as well as an index for 
quick page location of courses in specific subject areas. 

Course Abbreviation Page 

Anthropology ANTH 156 

Art ARTS 157 

Astronomy ASTR 161 

Biology BIOL 161 

Business Education* 265 

Chemistry CHEM 167 

Classics CLAS 171 

Communication COMM 171 

Computer Science CSCI 176 

Criminal Justice CRJU 172 

Criminal Justice Training Center Courses CJTC 268 

Dental Hygiene DHYG 180 

Dental Hygiene Education DHED 179 

Economics ECON 182 

Education Core CEUG 166 

Education Foundations FOUN 194 

Education, Early Childhood ECUG 184 

Education, Elementary EELE 1 86 

Education, Exceptional EEXE 186 

Education, Middle Grades and Secondary MGSE 219 

Engineering ENGR 192 

English ENGL 186 

Ethics ETHC 194 

Film FILM 194 

French FREN 195 

Geography GEOG 196 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 155 



Geology GEOL 197 

German GRMN 197 

Health Professions HLPR 206 

Health Science Administration HSCA 206 

Health Science Core HSCC 207 

Health Science Gerontology HSCG 208 

Health Science Public Health HSCP 208 

History HIST 198 

Honors HONS 206 

Humanities HUMN 209 

Journalism JOUR 209 

Latin LATN 209 

Library Media LMUG 211 

Library Science LSLI 211 

Linguistics LING 210 

Mathematics MATH 212 

Mathematics Education MAED 212 

Medical Technology MEDT 216 

Meteorology METR 219 

Military Science Courses MILS 268 

Music MUSC 221 

Naval Science Courses NSCI 269 

Nursing NURS 227 

Oceanography OCEA . . 230 

Philosophy PHIL 237 

Physical Education Activities PEBC 232 

Physical Education - Athletic Training PEAT 232 

Physical Education Elective PEEC 234 

Physical Education - Health Major PEHM 235 

Physical Science PHSC 238 

Physical Therapy PHTH 239 

Physics PHYS 240 

Political Science POLS 242 

Psychology PSYC 247 

Public Administration PUBL 250 

Public History PBHS 230 

Radiologic Sciences RADS 25 1 

Reading READ 254 

Regents' Remediation RGTR 257 

Respiratory Therapy RESP 255 

Science SCIE 257 

Speech/Language Pathology SLPA 257 

Social Sciences SSCI 263 

Sociology SOCI 258 

Spanish SPAN 260 

Theatre THEA 263 

University Studies AASU 1 56 



* Courses at Savannah State University - various prefixes. 



156 ARMSTRONG ATLANTIC STATE UNIVERSITY 



AASU - University Studies 

AASU 1101 STRATEGIES FOR SUCCESS 2-0-2 

Skills, information, and guidance useful for success in college while focusing on the purposes of 
higher education, the roles of the student, and the resources available within the university for 
academic success and career choices. 

ANTH - Anthropology 

ANTH 1102 INTRODUCTION TO ANTHROPOLOGY 3-0-3 

Introduction to the biocultural nature of humans through a survey of the subdisciplines of 
anthropology within an ecological and evolutionary framework. 

ANTH 1150 GLOBAL PERSPECTIVES IN ANTHROPOLOGY: 

PEOPLES OF THE WORLD 3-0-3 

Peoples of the world from a cultural anthropological perspective with an emphasis on contempo- 
rary issues and problems. 

ANTH 3020 HUMAN EVOLUTION 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: ANTH 1102 

Biological anthropology through the principles of evolution and genetics, evolutionary forces, 
human variation and adaptation, primate evolution and behaviour, the fossil record of human 
ancestors and early modern humans, and the relationship between human biology and culture. 

ANTH 3050 NORTH AMERICAN INDIANS 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: ANTH 1102 

Prehistoric, historic, and contemporary Native American populations north of Mexico, with an 

emphasis on the role of the environment in the diversity and complexity of Native American 

cultures. 

ANTH 3080 PRIMATE SOCIAL BEHAVIOUR AND ECOLOGY 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: permission of instructor or ANTH 1 102 

Social behaviour and ecology of prosimians, monkeys, and apes and the implications for the 
evolution of human social behaviour. Topics include primate origins and evolutionary trends, 
survey of living primates, social organization, ecology and social behaviour, and models for the 
evolution of human behaviour. 

ANTH 3100 ANTHROPOLOGY OF SEX AND GENDER 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: ANTH 1102 

Biological determinants of sex differences and the cultural determinants of gender roles, with an 

emphasis on the cross-cultural relationship between gender roles and the control of resources. 

ANTH 3800 INTRODUCTION TO PUBLIC HISTORY 3-0-3 

An introduction to the basic historiographic and anthropological approaches used in public history 
and a survey of the different disciplines such as archaeology, architecture, folklife, decorative arts, 
museum studies, and preservation which comprise public history. Crosslisted as HIST 3800 and 
PBHS 3800. 

ANTH 3820 INTRODUCTION TO ARCHAEOLOGY 3-0-3 

Survey of archaeology using cross-cultural examples. Focus on history, basic techniques, 
concepts, theories, and types of research. Cross listed as HIST 3820 and PUBL 3820. 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 157 



ANTH 3950 RESEARCH IN THE SOCIAL AND 

BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES V-V-(l-3) 

Prerequisite: permission of instructor or department 

Open to juniors or above. Uncompensated research assigned and directed by a faculty member 
using methods appropriate to the discipline. Evaluation by a rotating committee of the faculty 
before initiation and upon completion. Up to three hours credit in one discipline, for a maximum 
of six credit hours. 

ANTH 4000 SORCERY, DEMONS, AND GODS 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: ANTH 1102 

Anthropological analysis of religion and religious beliefs across cultures, including father gods 

and mother goddesses, sorcery and magic, shamanism, sacrifice, and totemism. 

ANTH 4050 SOCIOBIOLOGY OF HUMAN BEHAVIOUR 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: ANTH 1102 

Examination of human social behaviour from a biological anthropological perspective, including 
topics such as altruism and kinship, human mating strategies, reproduction and parenting, ecology 
of social systems, and life history strategies. 

ANTH 4401, -02, -03 SPECIAL TOPICS IN ANTHROPOLOGY 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: ANTH 1102 

Upper-level courses not otherwise offered in the anthropology curriculum. Various substantive 
topics, theoretical issues and problems. Possibility to repeat with different topics. No more than 
two such courses counted in the minor. 

ANTH 5700U AMERICAN MATERIAL CULTURE 2-1-3 

Prerequisite: permission of instructor or department 

Introduction to the study of North American and Caribbean culture, ordinarily focused on the 
eighteenth and nineteenth century. Architecture, cemeteries, landscape, dress, music, art, foodways, 
status, gender, and ethnic identifiers may provide examples. Crosslisted as HIST 5700U and 
PBHS 5700U. 

ANTH 5720U HISTORICAL ARCHAEOLOGY 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: HIST 3820 or PBHS 3820 or ANTH 3820 

The historical archaeology of the new world from the first arrival of Europeans and Africans to 
circa 1 800. Attention focused on the south and the Caribbean, but other frontier contexts may also 
be included. Emphasis given to anthropological archaeology as a perspective for the writing of 
history and as a sub-field within public history. Crosslisted as HIST 5720U and PBHS 5720U. 

ANTH 5730U FIELDWORK IN HISTORICAL ARCHAEOLOGY 0-12-6 

Prerequisite: HIST 3820 or PBHS 3820 or ANTH 3820 

Application of archaeological methods to a specific field project. Excavation techniques, 
surveying and map making, data collecting and recording, and the interpretation of archaeological 
data. May be repeated for credit. Crosslisted as HIST 5730U and PBHS 5730U. 

ARTS - Art 

ARTS 1010 DRAWING I 2-4-3 

Introduction to the techniques, materials and principles of drawing. 

ARTS 101 1 DRAWING II 2-4-3 

Techniques, materials and principles of drawing. 

ARTS 1120 TWO-DIMENSIONAL DESIGN 2-4-3 

The fundamentals of two dimensional design introduced through projects in a variety of media. 



158 ARMSTRONG ATLANTIC STATE UNIVERSITY 

ARTS 1030 THREE-DIMENSIONAL DESIGN 2-4-3 

An investigation of three-dimensional forms and space using materials and methods. 

ARTS 1100 ART APPRECIATION 3-0-3 

Artistic theories, styles, media, and techniques as they relate to the visual arts. Not recommended 
for art majors. 

ARTS 1270 WORLD ART AND MUSIC 3-0-3 

Comparison of traditional art and music from a variety of world cultures. Emphasis on art and 
music's role, media and techniques, and the inherent personal expression of various artists and 
composers. Crosslisted as MUSC 1270. 

ARTS 2011 PAINTING I 2-4-3 

Prerequisite: ARTS 1010 and ARTS 1020 

Acrylic painting from observed and secondary sources. 

ARTS 2012 PAINTING II 2-4-3 

Prerequisite: ARTS 2011 

Continuation of Painting I with increased emphasis on student selected problems. 

ARTS 2040 INTRODUCTION TO PHOTOGRAPHY 2-4-3 

Black and white photographic aesthetics, processes. Functions of 35mm camera and processing 
of film and printing. 

ARTS 2150 THE COMPUTER IN ART 2-4-3 

Prerequisite: ARTS 1020 or permission of instructor or department 

Computer as a tool for making art using its unique output characteristics to produce hardcopy on 
various printers and for making art using the hardcopy combined with traditional media. Emphasis 
on image making and image manipulation. 

ARTS 2400 INTRODUCTION TO CRAFT 2-4-3 

Basic craft processes and techniques with emphasis on fibers and metalwork. 

ARTS 2710 ART HISTORY I 3-0-3 

Visual arts from prehistory to the baroque period. 

ARTS 2720 ART HISTORY II 3-0-3 

Visual arts from the baroque period to World War II. 

ARTS 3030 OIL PAINTING 2-4-3 

Prerequisite: ARTS 2011 

Special qualities and techniques of oil painting. 

ARTS 3040 WATERCOLOR PAINTING 2-4-3 

Prerequisite: ARTS 1010 

Exploration of traditional and experimental approaches to transparent watercolor. 

ARTS 3110 GRAPHIC DESIGN 2-4-3 

Prerequisite: ARTS 1020 or permission of instructor or department 

Fundamentals of visual graphic communication as related to modern advertising techniques. 

Emphasis on design, layout, typography, and reproduction. 

ARTS 3130 DRAWING III 2-4-3 

Prerequisite: ARTS 1010 

Continuation of Drawing II emphasizing complex problems in concept design and media. 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 159 



ARTS 3140 INTERMEDIATE PHOTOGRAPHY 2-4-3 

Prerequisite: ARTS 2040 

Advanced study of the aesthetics and processes in black and white photography. 

ARTS 3150 COLOR PHOTOGRAPHY 2-4-3 

Prerequisite: ARTS 2040 

Aesthetics and print processes of color photography. 

ARTS 3160 HAND-COLORED AND MANIPULATED SILVER PRINT 2-4-3 

Prerequisite: ARTS 2040 

Exploration of media and techniques to enhance and alter a silver print. Emphasis on hand applied 

color and toning. 

ARTS 3170 EXPERIMENTATION IN PHOTOGRAPHY 2-4-3 

Prerequisite: ARTS 2040 

Exploration of experimental techniques, i.e., solarization, mordancage, negative prints, photo- 
grams, double exposures, and others. Non-silver processes, cyanotype, van dyke brown and 
others. 

ARTS 3200 ART AND THE CHILD 2-4-3 

The child and his or her development in relation to qualitative art experiences including studio 
experiences. Emphasis on materials and methods suitable for teaching art at the elementary school 
level. (May not be used for credit by art education majors.) 

ARTS 3300 CERAMICS I 2-4-3 

Fundamentals of wheel thrown pottery, hand building techniques, ceramic sculpture. Emphasis 
on decoration, form, craftsmanship, creativity. Traditional glazing and firing techniques and 
exploration into non-traditional methods of coloring and construction. 

ARTS 3310 POTTERY TECHNIQUES 2-4-3 

Techniques of pottery utilizing the potter's wheel. 

ARTS 3330 CERAMIC SCULPTURE 2-4-3 

Prerequisite: ARTS 3300 

Emphasis on developing ideas into large scale ceramic sculpture. Individual attention and 
direction facilitated. Projects may include pottery, the figure, abstractions, wall relief, mixed 
media constructions. 

ARTS 3350 GLAZE EXPERIMENTATION 2-4-3 

Prerequisite: ARTS 3300 

Raw materials and chemicals used in glazes, glaze formulation, and firing glazes in oxidation, 

reduction, and raku kilns. 

ARTS 3400 PRINTMAKING I 2-4-3 

Basic printmaking processes. Emphasis on relief, intaglio and non-traditional processes, i.e. 
collagraph, monoprints. 

ARTS 3500 ART IN THE ELEMENTARY GRADES 2-4-3 

Planning and implementing art instruction at the elementary level. Emphasis on materials, 
methods, procedures, and technology appropriate to children at different developmental levels 
with directed observation. 



160 ARMSTRONG ATLANTIC STATE UNIVERSITY 



ARTS 3510 ART FOR THE PRE-ADOLESCENT AND ADOLESCENT 2-4-3 

Planning and implementing art instruction at the secondary level. Emphasis on materials, 
methods, procedures, and technology appropriate to the pre-adolescent and adolescent with 
directed observations. 

ARTS 3620 JEWELRY/ENAMELING 2-4-3 

Design and production of jewelry and enameled objects. 

ARTS 3630 FABRIC DESIGN 2-4-3 

Application of original designs to fabric with emphasis on batik, tie-dye, direct application, and 
combined techniques. 

ARTS 3640 WEAVING 2-4-3 

Basic weaves, the hand loom, and off the loom weaving techniques. 

ARTS 3660 PAPERMAKING 2-4-3 

Hand papermaking with emphasis on the production of both two- and three-dimensional pieces. 

ARTS 3700 FIGURE SCULPTURE 2-4-3 

Prerequisite: ARTS 3300 

Basic sculpture ideas, terminology, processes. Emphasis on the human figure using clay and other 

media. 

ARTS 3710 SCULPTURE MATERIALS 2-4-3 

Additive and subtractive sculpture techniques with emphasis on wood construction, carving, and 
mixed media. 

ARTS 3750 CONTEMPORARY ART AND CRITICISM 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: ARTS 2710 and ARTS 2720 

Exploration of contemporary art historical and critical issues. 

ARTS 4140 FIGURE DRAWING 2-4-3 

Prerequisite: ARTS 1011 

The human figure as structure and expressive form in various media. 

ARTS 4500 CURRICULUM AND METHODS IN ART EDUCATION 2-4-3 

Prerequisite: ARTS 3500 or ARTS 3510 and admission to teacher education 
Supervised practice designed to give students the opportunity to further their studies in art 
education theory, history of art education, methods in teaching art, and use of technology in art 
education including supervised practice in the field. 

ARTS 4700 SENIOR PORTFOLIO 2-4-3 

Open to seniors. Development of a body of work in medium of choice that demonstrates a 
consistent theme or approach. Course taken in preparation for the senior portfolio review and 
exhibition. 

ARTS 4890 SELECTED STUDIES IN ART V-V-(l-4) 

Offered on demand to meet special institutional and community needs. May be repeated for credit. 

ARTS 4900 DIRECTED INDIVIDUAL STUDY V-V-U-4) 

Prerequisite: permission of instructor 

Independent course of study for advanced students in a discipline as mutually agreed to by student 

and instructor. 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 161 



ARTS 4910 INTERNSHIP 2-4-3 

Prerequisite: permission of instructor or department and 2.5 grade point average 

Individually designed off-campus study, work, and/or research project under the joint supervision 

of an institutional sponsor and a faculty supervisor. 

ARTS 4950 SPECIAL PROBLEMS 2-4-3 

Prerequisite: Nine hours of coursework in a selected studio area 

Special problems in visual arts mutually agreed to by student and instructor. 

ASTR - Astronomy 

ASTR 1010 ASTRONOMY OF THE SOLAR SYSTEM 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: eligibility for MATH 1111 

Astronomy from early ideas of the cosmos to modern observational techniques. Solar system 

planets, satellites, and minor bodies. Origin and evolution of the solar system. 

ASTR 3100 INTRODUCTION TO STELLAR ASTRONOMY 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: eligibility for MATH 1111 

Introduction to stellar astronomy. Stars, evolution of stars, galaxies, active galaxies and quasars, 

structure of the universe, and cosmology. 

BIOL - Biology 

BIOL 1107 PRINCIPLES OF BIOLOGY I 3-3-4 

Prerequisite: eligibility for ENGL 1 101 

Characteristics of living systems, structure and function of cells, genetics, evolution, biological 

chemistry, photosynthesis, principles and global aspects of ecology. 

BIOL 1108 SURVEY OF THE ANIMAL KINGDOM 3-3-4 

Prerequisite: BIOL 1107 

Evolutionary survey of the major animal phyla with special consideration of organ systems and 

natural history. 

BIOL 1120 DIVERSITY OF LIFE 3-3-4 

Prerequisite: BIOL 1107 

Survey of the kingdoms of life, including monera, protista, fungi, plantae, animalia, and sub-life 

groups such as viruses. (Credit may not be applied toward a major in biology.) 

BIOL 1121 HUMAN BIOLOGY 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: BIOL 1107 

Structure and function of human organ systems, human heredity, evolution, and ecology. (Credit 

may not be applied toward a major in biology.) 

BIOL 1122 ENVIRONMENTAL BIOLOGY 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: BIOL 1107 

Relationship of humans to their environment with consideration of natural cycles and balances. 
populations, energy, air and water pollution, solid waste issues and environmental regulation and 
legislation. (Credit may not be applied toward a major in biology.) 

BIOL 2010 MICROBIOLOGY 3-3-4 

Prerequisite: BIOL 1107 

Corequisite: CHEM 1211 

Genetics, classifications and methods of control of bacteria, fungi, protozoa and viruses, with 

introduction to medical, industrial and environmental microbiology. 



162 ARMSTRONG ATLANTIC STATE UNIVERSITY 



BIOL 2020 SURVEY OF THE KINGDOMS PLANTAE AND FUNGI 3-3-4 

Prerequisite: BIOL 1107 

Phylogeny, morphology and ecology of plants, fungi, and lichens including prokaryotic and 
eukaryotic algae, bryophytes, extinct early land plants and their extant species and fossil records 
of ferns, gymnosperms and flowering plants. 

BIOL 2081 HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY I 3-2-4 

Gross anatomy, histology and physiology of human organ systems. (Non-majors course intended 
for health professions students.) 

BIOL 2082 HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY II 3-2-4 

Prerequisite: BIOL 2081 

A continuation of BIOL 2081. Anatomy, histology, and physiology of human organ systems. 

(Non-majors course intended for health professions students.) 

BIOL 2150 HUMAN PHYSIOLOGY AND DISEASE 3-2-4 

Prerequisite: BIOL 2082 

Disease as a disruptive factor of physiological homeostasis: normal function, control, and 
environment of cells as a basis for understanding cellular and systemic responses to agents of 
injury and organismic effects to those responses. (Credit may not be applied to a major in biology.) 

BIOL 2210 MICROORGANISMS AND DISEASE 3-3-4 

Prerequisite: BIOL 2082 

Morphology, genetics, physiology, and public health importance of microorganisms with empha- 
sis on bacterial pathogens. 

BIOL 2230 FOOD SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: BIOL 2010 and CHEM 1211 

Interdisciplinary survey of the chemical and biological nature and utilization of foods, including 

storage and processing technologies affecting health, safety, and consumption. 

BIOL 2500 PRINCIPLES OF MODERN BIOLOGY 2-0-2 

Prerequisite: BIOL 1107 

Modern theories of gene structure, regulation and expression and principles of metabolism. 

BIOL 3000 CELL BIOLOGY 4-0-4 

Prerequisite: BIOL 2500 

Corequisite: CHEM 1211 

Evolution of cells from prokaryotic and from unicellular to multicellular. Structure of membranes, 

organelles, and cytoplasmic background, mitosis, meiosis, and the cell division cycle. 

BIOL 3010 MODERN BIOLOGY LABORATORY 0-4-1 

Prerequisite: BIOL 2500 

Corequisite: CHEM 1211 

Methods, techniques, and computer programs in modern cell and organismal biology. Micropipeting, 

protein assay including spectrophotometry and use of Kohler illumination, ocular micrometer 

calibration, plate magnification, DNA isolation and electrophoresis, and polymerase chain 

reaction. 

BIOL 3100 MAN AND THE ENVIRONMENT 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: BIOL 1107 

Interactions between humans and the support systems of the earth which are essential to their 

existence. (Credit for this course may not be applied toward a major in biology.) Crosslisted as 

GEOG3100. 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 163 






BIOL 3150 HORTICULTURE 3-2-4 

Prerequisite: BIOL 2020 

Basic gardening principles with emphasis on plant growth and development as responses to 
environmental conditions; plant classification, growth and development, environment, propaga- 
tion, disease, pest control. 

BIOL 3200 TAXONOMY AND IDENTIFICATION OF FLOWERING PLANTS 1-7-4 

Prerequisite: BIOL 2020 

Taxonomic systems used in plant classification, dichotomous keys, phytography, concepts of 
taxa, and uses of herbaria. Characteristics of major flowering plant families in the southeastern 
United States. Museum quality plant collection required. Weekly local field trips and trips to 
mountain regions and Florida. 

BIOL 3230 ANATOMY OF THE SEED PLANTS 3-3-4 

Prerequisite: BIOL 2020 

The cells, tissues, and internal organ structure of seed plants with emphasis on conifers and 
flowering plants. Coverage includes a detailed treatment of wood structure and wood identifica- 
tion techniques. 

BIOL 3300 ENTOMOLOGY 3-4-4 

Prerequisite: BIOL 1108 

Insects: structure, identification, and biology. 

BIOL 3310 INVERTEBRATE ZOOLOGY 3-3-4 

Prerequisite: BIOL 1108 

Structure, body functions, interrelations, and natural history of invertebrate groups. 

BIOL 3400 HUMAN PHYSIOLOGY 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: BIOL 2500 

Human organ systems with special attention to neuromuscular and cardiopulmonary function. 

BIOL 3410 FUNDAMENTALS OF NUTRITION 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: BIOL 1 108 and BIOL 2082 and CHEM 1211 

Biological bases of animal, including human, nutrition; sources, biological utilization, and 

functions of nutrients. 

BIOL 3510 BACTERIOLOGY 3-3-4 

Prerequisite: BIOL 2500 
Corequisite: CHEM 1211 
Prokaryotic cell structure and function including methods of control, industrial uses, and ecology. 

BIOL 3520 MEDICAL MICROBIOLOGY 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: BIOL 2010 and CHEM 1211 

Disease causing microbes, their diagnosis, pathogenesis, and epidemiology. 

BIOL 3530 IMMUNOLOGY AND SEROLOGY 3 3-4 

Prerequisite: BIOL 2010 and CHEM 121 1 

Humoral and cellular immunity, structure and biosynthesis o( antibodies, and interactions 

between antigens and antibodies. Emphasis on allergic states and immunological diseases. 

BIOL 3580 HISTOLOGICAL TECHNIQUE 1 4M 

Prerequisite: BIOL 1 108 and BIOL 2010 and BIOL 2020 

Principles and methods of killing, fixing, embedding, sectioning, staining, and mounting plant and 

animal materials. 



164 ARMSTRONG ATLANTIC STATE UNIVERSITY 



BIOL 3700 GENETICS 3-4-4 

Prerequisite: BIOL 2500 and BIOL 3000 

Classical, sex-associated, linkage and mapping, chromosomal, cytoplasmic, quantitative, popu- 
lation, and basic genetics of microorganisms and viruses. Lab emphasis on drosophila, plants, and 
the ascomycetes. 

BIOL 3750 NATURAL HISTORY OF VERTEBRATE ANIMALS 3-4-4 

Prerequisite: BIOL 1108 

Life histories, taxonomy, evolution, and adaptations of vertebrate animals with emphasis on 

identification and examination of local vertebrates through field oriented labs. 

BIOL 3770 DEVELOPMENTAL AND COMPARATIVE ANATOMY OF THE 
VERTEBRATES 3-6-4 

Prerequisite: BIOL 1108 

Development, anatomy, and evolution of vertebrate organ systems. 

BIOL 3870 ANIMAL HISTOLOGY 3-3-4 

Prerequisite: BIOL 1108 

Tissues and their organization into organs and organ systems in animals. 

BIOL 3920 PARASITOLOGY 3-4-4 

Prerequisite: BIOL 1108 

Comparative study of the internal and external parasites of humans and other animals. 

BIOL 4000 ADVANCED CELLULAR PHYSIOLOGY 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: BIOL 2500 and BIOL 3000 

Corequisite: CHEM 2101and CHEM 2101L 

Mechanisms, models, and theories explaining cellular phenomena with emphasis on eukaryotic 

animal cells, to include activities, electrical properties of cells, motility and communication. 

BIOL 4010 EVOLUTION 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: BIOL 1 108 and BIOL 2010 and BIOL 2020 and BIOL 2500 
Fossil and molecular evidence for the evolution of life on earth, mechanisms for evolution, rates 
of evolution, extinction, times of appearance, and dominance of the major vertebrate classes and 
vascular plant groups. 

BIOL 4090 MOLECULAR GENETICS 1-8-4 

Prerequisite: BIOL 2010 and BIOL 2500 and BIOL 3000 

Corequisite: CHEM 2101and CHEM 2101L 

Theories and principles in molecular biology including applications and ethical issues associated 

with new technologies. Laboratory emphasis on DNA isolation, quantification, hybridization and 

sequencing using prokaryotic systems. Methodologies include gel electrophoresis, Southern 

blotting and polymerase chain reaction. Term paper with oral and written presentations required. 

BIOL 4150 PLANT PHYSIOLOGY 3-3-4 

Prerequisite: BIOL 2010 and BIOL 2500 and BIOL 3000 

Physiologic processes occurring in plants and the conditions which affect these processes. 

BIOL 4200 GENERAL VERTEBRATE PHYSIOLOGY 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: BIOL 1108 and BIOL 2500 
Corequisite: BIOL 4220 and CHEM 2101 
General physiologic processes of vertebrates. 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 165 



BIOL 4210 COMPARATIVE PHYSIOLOGY 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: BIOL 2010 and BIOL 2500 and BIOL 3000 

Corequisite:CHEM2101 

Homeostatic mechanisms in animals, with emphasis on differing organs and adaptations which 

allow organisms to survive and succeed in their normal habitats, and animals' responses to normal 

environmental conditions and to experimental conditions. 

BIOL 4220 ENDOCRINOLOGY 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: BIOL 2010 and BIOL 2500 and BIOL 3000 

Corequisite: BIOL 4200 and CHEM 2101 

Vertebrate endocrine systems: glands, targets, mechanisms of action, and control of metabolism. 

BIOL 4300 MICROBIAL PHYSIOLOGY 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: BIOL 2010 and BIOL 2500 and BIOL 3000 

Corequisite: CHEM 2101 

Basic principles of chemical cytology of the microbial cell. Cell membrane structure and function, 

biochemistry of the cell, substrate uptake, energy production and conversions, metabolism, 

monomer and polymer biosynthesis, regulation and differentiation. 

BIOL 4310 APPLIED MICROBIOLOGY 3-3-4 

Prerequisite: BIOL 2010 and BIOL 2500 and BIOL 3000 

Corequisite: CHEM 2101 

Microbiological aspects of food, milk, water, domestic wastes, and industry. 

BIOL 4320 ENVIRONMENTAL MICROBIOLOGY 4-0-4 

Prerequisite: BIOL 2010 and BIOL 2500 and BIOL 3000 
Corequisite: CHEM 2101 

Principles and applications of environmental microbiology. Topics include habitat and commu- 
nity ecology; biogeochemical cycles; biodegradation; pollution control; resource recovery; soil, 
water, and waste management. Lab research project with oral and written presentations required. 

BIOL 4400 VIROLOGY 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: BIOL 2010 and BIOL 2500 and BIOL 3000 

Chemical and physical characteristics of viruses including pathogenesis and epidemiology. 

BIOL 4450 MORPHOLOGY OF VASCULAR PLANTS 3-3-4 

Prerequisite: BIOL 2020 

Vascular plants with emphasis on form, anatomy, organography, reproduction, and evolutionary 
relationships; gametophyte and sporophyte structure, gametangia, sporangia, and embryogeny. 
Plant divisions from the extinct Rhyniophytes to the Magnoliophyta. 

BIOL 4510 MODERN PRINCIPLES OF DEVELOPMENT 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: BIOL 1 108 and BIOL 2500 and BIOL 3000 

Cellular and molecular level signals which guide differentiation and morphogenesis. 

BIOL 4550 BIOLOGY OF MARINE ORGANISMS 3-4-4 

Prerequisite: BIOL 1 108 and BIOL 2020 

Relationship between organisms and abiotic and biotic features of the marine environment, with 

emphasis on local marine ecosystems. Field labs. 

BIOL 4560 PHYSIOLOGICAL ECOLOGY 3-3-4 

Prerequisite: BIOL 1 108 and BIOL 2020 and BIOL 2500 

Organismal level, especially animal, responses and adaptations to biotic and abiotic environmen- 
tal variables, primarily heat, light, and water. 



166 ARMSTRONG ATLANTIC STATE UNIVERSITY 



BIOL 4700 GENERAL ECOLOGY 3-4-4 

Open to seniors only. Principles of ecology and their application to the welfare of humans; field 
study of populations and communities, research project with oral and written presentation. 
Ecology is a discipline which draws on information and methods from other areas of biology and 
science, and constitutes a capstone experience for biology students. Required for biology major. 
Must have two biology courses numbered 3000 or above to register. 

BIOL 4800 SENIOR SEMINAR 1-0-1 

Open to seniors only. Library research, oral and written presentations, discussions in related areas 
of biology. Open to seniors in the last two semesters of their biology major program. Required for 
biology majors. 

BIOL 4910 RESEARCH I V-V-3 

Prerequisite: permission of instructor or department 

Assigned research activity directed by a faculty member in the department: literature search, field 
and/or laboratory investigation and presentation (oral and written) of results. Project to be 
approved by the faculty member and department head. Must have three biology major courses at 
the 3000+ level and a B average in biology courses and overall work. 

BIOL 4920 RESEARCH II V-V-3 

Prerequisite: permission of instructor or department 

Assigned research activity directed by a faculty member in the department: literature search, field 
and/or laboratory investigation and presentation (oral and written) of results. Project to be 
approved by the faculty member and department head. Must have three biology major courses at 
the 3000+ level and a B average in biology courses and overall work. 

BIOL 4950 INTERNSHIP I V-V-3 

Prerequisite: permission of instructor or department 

Biological project sponsored by an outside agency. Project selected, supervised, evaluated by 

faculty advisor and department head in consultation with outside agency. 

BIOL 4960 INTERNSHIP II V-V-3 

Prerequisite: permission of instructor or department 

Biological project sponsored by an outside agency. Project selected, supervised, evaluated by 

faculty advisor and department head in consulatation with outside agency. 

BIOL 4970 SPECIAL TOPICS V-V-3 

Prerequisite: permission of instructor or department 
Topics of special interest. 

BIOL 5810U HUMAN PHYSIOLOGY 3-0-3 

Functioning of human organs and systems. Some neuromuscular and cardiopulmonary emphasis. 

CEUG - Education Core 

CEUG 1010 HUMAN GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT 3-1-3 

Lifespan development that focuses on physical, emotional, cognitive, and social development. 
Application to classroom teaching and learning. 

CEUG 2100 TEACHING AND THE EXCEPTIONAL CHILD 3-1-3 

Prerequisite: CEUG 1010 

Orientation to professional teaching and to the exceptional child with emphasis on educational 

implications and rehabilitation requirements. 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 167 



CEUG 3072 TEACHING OF READING 3-4-3 

Prerequisite: ECUG 3071 or permission of instructor 

Developmental reading program with emphasis on reading skills, approaches, techniques, 

materials and evaluation including directed field experiences. Crosslisted as ECUG 3072. 

CEUG 3500 ORAL COMMUNICATION FOR TEACHERS 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: permission of instructor or department 

Morphological, phonological, syntactical, grammatical, and semantic structures of student 

idiolects and strategies for moving to standard American English. 

CEUG 3351 GENERAL SCHOOL CURRICULUM AND METHODS (P-12) 3-6-3 

Prerequisite: admission to teacher education 

Directed field experience. Study of P-12 curriculum and methods. Detailed study of techniques 

of systematic observation, preparation of behavioral objectives, analysis of critical incidents, 

production of media materials, practices of classroom control, instructional models, and technical 

applications. 

CEUG 4100 INDEPENDENT STUDY 1-8-3 

Prerequisite: admission to teacher education 

An in-depth, closely supervised, instructor-approved study in education. Student must have skills 

in independent research and study. 

CEUG 4110 STUDENT TEACHING P-12 O-V-9 

Prerequisite: admission to teacher education 

Provides opportunities to use knowledge and skills in a supervised P-12 public school setting. 

CEUG 4630 CLASSROOM MANAGEMENT P-12 3-8-3 

Prerequisite: admission to teacher education 

Provides research knowledge base to create a well-managed classroom and guide the behavior of 

P-12 students. Field placement. 

CEUG 4811, -12 INTERNSHIP P-12 O-V-6 

Prerequisite: permission of the director of professional laboratory experiences. 

Students who hold teaching positions in school and/or clinical settings will be supervised by a 

university faculty member for one academic semester. 

CEUG 5010U EDUCATION TESTS AND MEASUREMENTS 3-2-3 

Prerequisite or corequisite: CEUG 3072 or ECUG 3072 

Measurements which cover statistical methods, research designs, and research problems; admin- 
istration and evaluation of psychological tests. 

CHEM - Chemistry 

CHEM 1151 SURVEY OF CHEMISTRY I 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: eligibility for MATH 1111 

First course in a two-semester sequence covering elementary principles of general, organic, and 

biochemistry designed for allied health profession majors. 

CHEM 1151L SURVEY OF CHEMISTRY I LABORATORY 0-3-1 

Prerequisite: eligibility for MATH 1111 

Corequisite: CHEM 1151 

Laboratory exercises supplement the lecture material of CHEM 1151. 



168 ARMSTRONG ATLANTIC STATE UNIVERSITY 



CHEM 1152 SURVEY OF CHEMISTRY II 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: CHEM 1151 

Second course in a two-semester sequence covering elementary principles of general, organic, and 

biochemistry designed for allied health profession majors. 

CHEM 1152L SURVEY OF CHEMISTRY II LABORATORY 0-3-1 

Prerequisite: CHEM 1151L 

Corequisite: CHEM 1152 

Laboratory exercises supplement the lecture material of CHEM 1152. 

CHEM 1211 PRINCIPLES OF CHEMISTRY I 3-0-3 

Prerequisite or Corequisite: MATH 1111 

Corequisite: CHEM 121 1L 

First course in a two-semester sequence covering the fundamental principles and applications of 

chemistry designed for science majors. Topics include composition of matter; nomenclature; 

atomic structure; bonding and molecular geometries; stoichiometry; properties of solids, liquids, 

gases; acids and bases; solutions; thermochemistry; and periodic relations. 

CHEM 1211L PRINCIPLES OF CHEMISTRY I LAB 0-4-1 

Corequisite: CHEM 1211 

Analytical applications of chemical laws and principles emphasized through laboratory investi- 
gations. 

CHEM 1212 PRINCIPLES OF CHEMISTRY II 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: CHEM 1211 
Corequisite: CHEM 121 2L 

Second course in a two-semester sequence covering the fundamental principles and applications 
of chemistry designed for science majors. Topics include thermodynamics; equilibria (including 
complex equilibria); kinetics; electrochemistry; nuclear chemistry; descriptive inorganic chem- 
istry; and introduction to organic chemistry. 

CHEM 1212L PRINCIPLES OF CHEMISTRY II LAB 0-4-1 

Corequisite: CHEM 1212 

Analytical applications of chemical laws and principles emphasized through laboratory investi- 
gations. 

CHEM 2010 ESSENTIALS OF CHEMISTRY 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: eligibility for MATH 1111 

Quantitative survey of chemical sciences emphasizing applications in human physiology, clinical 
chemistry, inorganic, organic, and biochemistry. Experimental principles illustrated with class- 
room demonstrations. (Credit in CHEM 2010 may not be applied to the major field requirement 
in chemistry.) 

CHEM 2101 ORGANIC CHEMISTRY I 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: CHEM 1212 

Prerequisite or corequisite: CHEM 2101L 

Fundamental principles and theories of organic chemistry. Topics include bonding, organic 

functional groups, organic synthesis, and spectroscopic analysis of organic molecules. 

CHEM 2101L ORGANIC CHEMISTRY I LAB 0-4-1 

Prerequisite or corequisite: CHEM 2101 

Experiments utilize laboratory techniques in organic chemistry; reactions of organic compounds, 

organic synthesis, and spectroscopic analysis. 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 169 



CHEM 2102 ORGANIC CHEMISTRY II 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: CHEM 2101 and CHEM 2101L 
Prerequisite or corequisite: CHEM 2102L 
Continuation of CHEM 2101, Organic Chemistry I. 

CHEM 2102L ORGANIC CHEMISTRY II LAB 0-4-1 

Prerequisite or corequisite: CHEM 2102 

Experiments utilize laboratory techniques in organic chemistry; reactions of organic compounds, 

organic synthesis, and spectroscopic analysis. 

CHEM 2200 SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY, AND THE MODERN WORLD 3-0-3 

Prerequisite or corequisite: MATH 1111 

Impact of science and technology on everyday life using quantitative case studies. 

CHEM 2230 FOOD SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY 3-0-3 

Interdisciplinary study of the chemical and biological nature and utilization of foods, including 
storage and processing technologies affecting health, safety, and consumption. 

CHEM 2300 PRINCIPLES OF CHEMICAL ANALYSIS 3-4-4 

Prerequisite: CHEM 1212 

Classical methods of analysis including gravimetric and volumetric as well as statistical treatment 
of data and aqueous equilibria. Practical applications of fundamental principles of chemical 
analysis emphasized in the lab. 

CHEM 2600 ETHICAL THEORIES AND MORAL ISSUES IN THE SCIENCES 2-0-2 

Prerequisite or corequisite: 6 semester hours of science 

Examination of the relationship between ethical theory and moral practice in specific areas of our 
society. This course involves two parts: (1) an explanation and analysis of the principal ethical 
theories of the Western world and (2) the application of those ethical theories to moral issues and 
case studies in the physical sciences. 

CHEM 3071 PRINCIPLES OF CHEMICAL PROCESSES I 2-0-2 

Prerequisite: CHEM 1212 and MATH 1 161 

Introduction to methods of material and energy balance in chemical processes. Emphasis on 
process variables, systems of units, gas behavior, single/multiphase systems, and energy changes 
in reactive/non-reactive processes. (Credit in CHEM 3071 may not be applied to the major field 
requirement in chemistry.) 

CHEM 3072 PRINCIPLES OF CHEMICAL PROCESSES II 2-0-2 

Prerequisite: CHEM 3071 

Continuation of CHEM 3071. (Credit in CHEM 3072 may not be applied to the major field 

requirement in chemistry.) 

CHEM 3100 CHEMICAL FORENSICS 3-4-4 

Prerequisite: eligibility for MATH 1111 and 3 semester hours of lab science 
Fundamental principles of chemical forensics. Topics include but are not limited to explosives, 
soil, paint, blood and body fluid chemistry. Laboratory component reinforces the topics covered 
with a hands-on approach. 

CHEM 3200 INORGANIC CHEMISTRY 3-4-4 

Prerequisite: CHEM 2300 
Prerequisite or corequisite: CHEM 2101 

Fundamental principles in inorganic chemistry. Topics include electronic structure of atoms, 
inorganic bonding theories, group theory, coordination chemistry, and spectroscopic applica- 
tions. The lab reinforces theoretical aspects. 



170 ARMSTRONG ATLANTIC STATE UNIVERSITY 



CHEM 3300 INSTRUMENTAL ANALYSIS 3-4-4 

Prerequisite: CHEM 2102 and CHEM 2300 

Modern methods of instrumental analysis with emphasis on electroanalytical, spectrophotometric 
and chromatographic techniques. Practical applications of fundamental principles of instrumental 
analysis reinforced in the lab. 

CHEM 3401 PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY I 3-4-4 

Prerequisite: CHEM 2300 and MATH 1 161 and either PHYS 1 1 1 1 or PHYS 221 1 
Fundamentals of physical chemistry including gas laws, heat and work, and laws of thermody- 
namics. Material and reaction equilibrium and standard thermodynamic functions. Single and 
multi-component phase equilibria. Analytical applications of physical chemistry emphasized 
through lab investigations. 

CHEM 3402 PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY II 3-4-4 

Prerequisite: CHEM 3401 

Continuation of CHEM 3401. Kinetic-molecular theory, transport processes, reaction kinetics, 
quantum mechanics, theories of atomic/molecular structure, spectroscopy, photochemistry. 
Analytical applications of physical chemistry emphasized through lab investigations. 

CHEM 3801 BIOCHEMISTRY I 3-4-4 

Prerequisite: CHEM 2102 

Chemistry of cellular components. Protein structure and function, enzyme kinetics, and mecha- 
nisms of catalysis, carbohydrate and lipid metabolism and biosynthesis. Analytical applications 
of biochemistry emphasized through lab investigations. 

CHEM 3802 BIOCHEMISTRY II 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: CHEM 3801 

Chemistry of cellular components: function and biosynthesis of nucleic acids, DNA manipula- 
tions and recombinant technology, DNA transcription, translation, protein synthesis, and regulation 
of gene expression. 

CHEM 3900 CHEMICAL RESEARCH 0-V-V 

Prerequisite: permission of department head 

Prerequisite or corequisite: CHEM 2102 

Open only to majors in chemistry. Faculty originated chemical lab-based research project. Written 

report. Open to transient students only with permission of the department head. 

CHEM 4100 ADVANCED ORGANIC CHEMISTRY 3-4-4 

Prerequisite: CHEM 2102 and CHEM 2102L and CHEM 3402 

Topics include synthesis of complex molecules and natural products, asymmetric synthesis and 
mechanistic organic chemistry. Analytical applications of organic chemistry emphasized through 
lab investigations. 

CHEM 4200 ADVANCED INORGANIC CHEMISTRY 3-4-4 

Prerequisite: CHEM 3200 and CHEM 3401 

Topics include mechanisms of inorganic reactions, bioinorganic chemistry, solid state, organo- 
metallic and others of current interest. Independent research project including a literature search, 
lab research, and oral presentation of results required. 

CHEM 4300 ADVANCED INSTRUMENTAL ANALYSIS 3-4-4 

Prerequisite: CHEM 3300 and CHEM 3402 

Spectrometric and chromatographic analysis. Ultraviolet, atomic emission, atomic absorption, 
infrared, nuclear magnetic resonance, mass spectrometry, gas and high performance liquid 
chromatography. Applications of instrumental analysis emphasized in the lab. 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 171 



CHEM 4940 SPECIAL TOPICS IN CHEMISTRY V-V-U-3) 

Prerequisite: announced with the topic, permission of department head 

Topics chosen from all fields of chemistry dependent on instructor and student interest. Offered 

by special arrangement. 

CHEM 4960 INTERNSHIP V-V-U-12) 

Prerequisite: CHEM 2102 and CHEM 3300 and CHEM 3402 and permission of department head 
Supervised individual research in a non-academic lab setting. Directed by a scientist onsite. Work 
and credit pre-approved by department head. Paper and oral presentation required. 

CHEM 4991, -2, -3, -4 ADVANCED CHEMICAL RESEARCH 0-(3-9)-(l-3) 

Prerequisite: permission of department head and CHEM 2101 and CHEM 550 1U and CHEM 
3401 

Faculty-originated chemical lab-based research project. Literature evaluation and lab investiga- 
tion. Scientific paper and oral presentation to faculty. 

CHEM 5501U CHEMISTRY SEMINAR I 1-0-1 

Prerequisite: CHEM 2102 

Introduction to use of the chemistry library, journals, references, and electronic information 
sources. Students select approved topics of scientific interest, perform literature searches, and 
prepare written critiques. Students required to attend faculty and scientific lectures. 

CHEM 5502U CHEMISTRY SEMINAR II 1-0-1 

Prerequisite: CHEM 5501U 

Continuation of CHEM 550 1U. Students select approved topics, perform literature searches, 

prepare written reports, and make oral presentations at faculty/student forums. 

CHEM 5600U CHEMICAL SAFETY 2-0-2 

Prerequisite: CHEM 2102 

Standard laboratory safety practices emphasizing the hazardous properties of chemicals, safe 

storage, chemical disposal and government regulations. 

CHEM 5700U HISTORY OF CHEMISTRY 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: CHEM 1212 or PHSC 1212 

Survey of the development of chemistry and its relationship to the study of science. Prominent 
chemists, chemical theories, and implications of science covered. Written and oral presentations. 
(Credit may not be applied to the major field requirements in chemistry.) 

CLAS - Classics 

CLAS 3351, -2, -3 STUDY ABROAD IN ROME AND ATHENS 9-0-9 

Prerequisite: LATN 1002 

An 8-9 week summer semester's residence and study in Rome and Athens in conjunction with the 
Studies Abroad Program of the University System of Georgia. Through visits to monuments, 
museums, and classical ruins, and on excursions to Crete, Delphi, Ostia, Tivoli, Tarquinia. and 
Frascati, the student experiences first hand the reality of life in the ancient world. Crosslisted as 
LATN 3351, -2, -3. 

COMM - Communication 

COMM 2280 SPEECH COMMUNICATION 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: ENGL 1101 

Practice and theory of communication and public speaking, focusing on developing the skills 

required to prepare and deliver a public address. 



172 ARMSTRONG ATLANTIC STATE UNIVERSITY 



COMM 3050 INTERPERSONAL AND SMALL GROUP COMMUNICATION 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: ENGL 1101 

Examination of communication as a tool in creation and implementation of organizational policy. 

COMM 3060 PUBLIC RELATIONS 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: ENGL 2100 

Introduction to the nature and scope of public relations, the principles and techniques underlying 

the practice. 

COMM 3270 VIDEO LAB 0-1-1 

Prerequisite: ENGL 1102 

Practical experience in video production through work on approved projects under supervision of 
Armstrong Atlantic's video production coordinator. Only one hour of credit may be earned per 
semester. Repeatable up to three hours. Crosslisted as THEA 3270. 

COMM 3360 CRITICAL APPROACHES TO MASS CULTURE 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: ENGL 2100 or PHIL 2201 or PHIL 2251 

Examination of the theoretical and critical approaches to the study of various forms of cultural 
expression, including film television, popular literature, magazines, music, video, and radio. 
Applications of various critical methodologies to these forms. Crosslisted as FILM 3360. 

COMM 4000 SPECIAL TOPICS IN COMMUNICATION V-V-3 

Prerequisite: COMM 2280 or permission of instructor 

Subject announced when course offered. Subjects vary, such as: environmental impacts on 

communication, transactional analysis theory. 

CRJU - Criminal Justice 

CRJU 1010 INTRODUCTION TO CRIMINAL JUSTICE 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: eligibility for ENGL 1101 

Emergence and current state of formal institutions established within the American experience to 
deal with criminal behavior. Philosophical, cultural, social, economic, and political aspects of the 
justice system and process. 

CRJU 1020 ETHICAL THEORIES AND MORAL ISSUES IN 

CRIMINAL JUSTICE 2-0-2 

Relationship between ethical theory and criminal justice policies and practices. Principal ethical 
theories of the western world and the application of these theories to the administration of justice 
in the United States. Ethical underpinnings of the crime control and due process models of justice. 

CRJU 1030 INTERPERSONAL COMMUNICATION SKILLS 3-0-3 

Development of interpersonal communication skills to improve interaction among agency 
employees and between employees and the public. 

CRJU 1200 INTRODUCTION TO LAW ENFORCEMENT 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: CRJU 1010 

History, philosophy, and basic objectives of the police system in the U.S. and Georgia. Empha- 
sizes applications of the law for law enforcement officers. 

CRJU 2010 UNIVERSAL JUSTICE 2-0-2 

Prerequisite: eligibilty for ENGL 1101 

Critical juxtaposition of the justice ideal in actual practice in the U.S. and other countries. 

Development of universal justice construct rooted in the rule of law and applicable to terrorism, 

piracy, international criminal conspiracy, immigration, sanctuary, asylum, amnesty, and war 

crimes. 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 173 



CRJU 2100 CRIMINOLOGY 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: eligibility for ENGL 1101 

Nature and extent of crime in the U.S. Evaluation of factors leading to criminal behavior and 

measures proposed to control it. 

CRJU 2200 CRIMINAL INVESTIGATION 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: eligibility for ENGL 1101 

Investigative methodology focusing on techniques employed in criminal investigation, including 

crime scene searches, use of informants and surveillance. Presentation of police cases in court. 

CRJU 2500 CRIMINAL EVIDENCE AND PROCEDURE 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: CRJU 1010 

Historical and contemporary overview of rules governing criminal procedure and rules of 
evidence as they affect the accused, the convicted, the functions of law enforcement, and the 
conduct of criminal prosecutions. Constitutional rights of the accused and the conflict of those 
rights with maintenance of public order and enforcement of criminal law. 

CRJU 2510 INTRODUCTION TO CRIMINAL LAW 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: CRJU 1010 

Origin and evolution of legal norms used by government to control deviant behavior, and their 
distinct form and overlap with moral and social norms. Emphasis on the role of criminal law in 
a system of ordered liberty. 

CRJU 2700 DIRECTED READINGS IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE V-V-(l-3) 

Prerequisite: CRJU 1010 

Independent study and research on an approved topic, directed by a faculty member. 

CRJU 3100 RESEARCH METHODS 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: ENGL 1 101 and ENGL 1 102 and MATH 2200 

Open to juniors and seniors only. Methods and techniques of research in the social sciences. 

Emphasis on evaluating research. 

CRJU 3110 CRITICAL THEORY OF CRIMINAL JUSTICE 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: CRJU 2100 

Critiques of American criminal justice theory and practice from alternative viewpoints. 

CRJU 3120 ILLEGAL IMMIGRATION 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: CRJU 1010 and either HIST 1 100 or POLS 1 100 

Political and legal aspects of immigration in a nation of immigrants. Emphasis on operational and 

bureaucratic impediments of enforcement of immigration laws. 

CRJU 3130 HATE CRIMES AND ORDERED LIBERTY 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: HIST 1 100 or POLS 1 100 

Racial, ethnic, cultural, and religious strife and the tension between freedom and equality in 
democratic societies. Focus on the governmental definition of hate crimes and the historical, 
economic, and political roots of such crimes. Crosslisted as SOCI 3130. 

CRJU 3140 POLITICAL CRIMES 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: CRJU 1010 and either HIST 1 100 or POLS 1 100 

Crimes committed by and against the governments and officers of modern democratic states. 
Focus on criminal activity by government leaders acting in official capacity and on all illegal 
activities at all levels of government in the United States. 



174 ARMSTRONG ATLANTIC STATE UNIVERSITY 



CRJU 3160 WHITE-COLLAR AND ORGANIZED CRIME 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: CRJU 1010 

Nature, scope, and impact of white collar, corporate, and organized crime on the individual and 

American society. 

CRJU 3200 CRIMINALISTICS 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: 6 semester hours of science 

Problems and techniques of scientific criminal investigation. The role of science and technology 

in modern law enforcement. 

CRJU 3210 LAW ENFORCEMENT: STRUCTURE AND PROCESS 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: CRJU 1010 

Philosophical, cultural, and historical background of policing, focusing on the role of police in 

contemporary society, quasi-military organization, and community relations. 

CRJU 3220 INDUSTRIAL, COMMERCIAL, AND PRIVATE SECURITY 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: CRJU 1010 

History, development, and analysis of privately employed police and security in the U.S. Topics 
include an analysis of public vs. private agencies, types (contract and proprietary), and compo- 
nents (physical, information and personnel) of private security. Special emphasis on the functions, 
strengths, and problems encountered by privatized agencies. 

CRJU 3400 CORRECTIONS 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: CRJU 1010 

Analysis and evaluation of both historical and contemporary correctional systems. Development, 

organization operation, and results of the different correctional systems in the U.S. 

CRJU 3410 COMMUNITY-BASED TREATMENT 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: CRJU 3400 

Review of community-based treatment programs, emphasizing functions of halfway houses and 

use of volunteers in corrections. 

CRJU 3510 FAMILY VIOLENCE 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: CRJU 1010 or SOCI 1101 or permission of the instructor 

Study of the family as an institution that may produce violent individuals. Correlates of family 
violence, theoretical explanations, impact on public policy, effects on victims and society. 
Crosslisted as SOCI 3510. 

CRJU 3600 TOPICS IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE V-V-(l-3) 

Prerequisite: permission of instructor or department 

Substantive topics, problems, and issues not covered in other courses but of importance to 
contemporary study of criminal justice. Topics to be announced before each offering; course may 
be repeated if topic is substantially different. 

CRJU 4100 CRIMINALITY AND ABNORMAL BEHAVIOR 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: CRJU 1010 

Interface between abnormal behavior and criminality regarding identification, classification, and 
treatment of criminals. Emphasis on behavioral patterns and motivations of repeat offenders such 
as child molesters and serial killers. 

CRJU 4400 SEMINAR IN CORRECTIONS MANAGEMENT 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: CRJU 3400 

Basic principles and practices of administration and their application to adult and juvenile 
corrections. Special emphasis upon organizational structure, planning, decision making, manage- 
ment strategies, and personnel management. 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 175 



CRJU 4500 ADVANCED LAW OF EVIDENCE 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: CRJU 2500 and CRJU 5500U 

Epistemological assumptions and policy purposes of evidentiary rules, doctrines and concepts. 

CRJU 4510 ADVANCED CRIMINAL LAW 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: CRJU 2510 and CRJU 5500U 

Criminal law as social control within ordered liberty. Emphasizes economic and moral compo- 
nents of undergirding public policy. 

CRJU 4800 INTERNSHIP V-V-12 

Prerequisite: permission of instructor or department 

Open to juniors or above. Application of academic knowledge in criminal justice setting. Joint 
supervision by faculty internship coordinator and agency officials. Open to transient students only 
with permission of the department head. 

CRJU 4900 DIRECTED RESEARCH IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: CRJU 3100 

Open to seniors. Conduct of a major research project with presentation of the results orally and 

in a paper conforming to departmental guidelines. 

CRJU 4910 SEMINAR IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: CRJU 3100 

Open to seniors. Conduct of research and presentation of results orally and in a paper conforming 

to departmental guidelines. 

CRJU 5130U POLITICAL TERRORISM 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: CRJU 1010 and either HIST 1 100 or POLS 1 100 

International and domestic terrorism undertaken for political purposes in liberal states. Primary 
focus on state-sponsored international terrorism, American domestic revolutionary terrorism, and 
the dilemmas of counterterrorism in a democracy. Crosslisted as POLS 5130U. 

CRJU 5200U ALCOHOL, DRUGS, AND CRIMINAL JUSTICE 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: CRJU 1010 

Exploration of the pharmacological effects and medical uses of drugs and alcohol; the relation- 
ships between drugs and crime, the criminal justice system, and government's crime control 
policy. 

CRJU 5300U JUVENILE DELINQUENCY 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: CRJU 1010 

Theories of juvenile delinquency, emphasizing sociological, biological, and psychological 

factors. Modern trends in prevention and treatment. 

CRJU 5500U LAW AND LEGAL PROCESS 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: HIST 1 100 or POLS 1 100 

Law as a dynamic societal institution. Sources and functions of both civil and criminal law and 
operation of the legal process viewed from the perspectives of jurisprudence, political science, and 
sociology. Crosslisted as POLS 5500U. 

CRJU 5520U COMPARATIVE JUDICIAL SYSTEMS 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: CRJU 5500U or POLS 5500U 

Law enforcement and judicial procedure in political systems of Great Britain, France, Russia, and 

Japan. Crosslisted as POLS 5520U. 



176 ARMSTRONG ATLANTIC STATE UNIVERSITY 



CSCI - Computer Science 

CSCI 1050 INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTER 

CONCEPTS AND APPLICATIONS 2-3-3 

Prerequisite: MATH 1111 

Study of hardware and software components of computers, and the impact of computers on 
society. Discussion of the capabilities and the limitations of computers, and the kinds of problems 
that are best solved by computers. Experience with using personal computer productivity tools to 
solve representative problems. Emphasis on the major uses of computers. Not designed for the 
computer science major. Credit granted for only one of CSCI 1050, 1060 or 2060. 

CSCI 1060 COMPUTER CONCEPTS AND APPLICATIONS 

FOR SCIENCE STUDENTS 2-3-3 

Corequisite: MATH 1113 

Introduction to computing and algorithmic development including data structures (not computer 
programming). Laboratory emphasis on using personal computer productivity tools and campus 
computing resources. Includes operating systems and application of standard tools to solve 
representative problems from science and engineering. Credit granted for only one of CSCI 1050, 
1060, or 2060. 

CSCI 1301 INTRODUCTION TO PROGRAMMING PRINCIPLES 3-3-4 

Prerequisite: MATH 1113 

Fundamentals of computer programming, including: structured programming, control structures; 
input/output, functions and procedures, fundamental data types, arrays and records, elementary 
searching and sorting; debugging techniques. 

CSCI 1302 ADVANCED PROGRAMMING PRINCIPLES 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: MATH 1 1 13 and CSCI 1301 

Advanced computer programming, including: introduction to algorithmic analysis, abstract data 

types, recursion, binary files, pointers, lists, queues, stacks, trees, efficient sorting algorithms. 

CSCI 1330 RPG PROGRAMMING 1-0-1 

Prerequisite: CSCI 1301 

Introduction to RPG including programming applications for small computer systems. 

CSCI 1360 FORTRAN PROGRAMMING 1-0-1 

Prerequisite: CSCI 1301 

Algorithmic processes of computer problem solving in a scientific context using FORTRAN 

programming language. Topics include syntax, arrays, input-output, subroutines, functions. 

CSCI 1370 PROGRAMMING PRINCIPLES WITH COBOL 1-0-1 

Prerequisite: CSCI 1301 

Introduction to COBOL programming language. Topics include basic syntax, input-output, 
debugging, table handling, sorting, searching, sequential and random file manipulation, struc- 
tured programming. 

CSCI 2060 COMPUTER LITERACY FOR EDUCATORS 2-0-2 

Prerequisite: MATH 1111 

Hardware and software components of computers, elementary programming and the impact of 
computers on curriculum. Discussion of the capabilities and limitations of computers, and the 
kinds of problems that are best solved by computers. Experience with developing and modifying 
algorithms to solve such problems. Emphasis on instructional uses of microcomputers. Not 
designed for the computer science major. May not be applied as part of a language sequence. 
Credit granted for only one of CSCI 1050, 1060, or 2060. 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 177 



CSCI 2070 ETHICAL CONSIDERATIONS IN COMPUTER SCIENCE 1-0-1 

Study of ethical considerations for computer professionals and users. Topics include issues of 
privacy, security, intellectual rights. 

CSCI 2252 COMPUTATIONAL METHODS IN STATISTICS 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: MATH 2200 and either CSCI 1050 or CSCI 1301 

Statistical programming with Minitab and SAS software, including data analyses involving 

ANOVA, multiple regression, nonparametric statistics. Crosslisted as MATH 2252. 

CSCI 2390 PROGRAMMING IN C++ 1-0-1 

Prerequisite: CSCI 1302 

Introduction to C++ programming language. Topics include syntax of C++, input7output, control 

structures, data types, compilation units. Introduction to classes, including use and simple class 

implementation. 

CSCI 2620 DISCRETE STRUCTURES FOR COMPUTER SCIENCE 4-0-4 

Prerequisite: MATH 1 1 13 and CSCI 1 301 

Introduction to proportional and predicate logic; naive set theory; relations and functions; graphs; 

finite automata; Turing machines; formal languages and grammars. 

CSCI 2990 TOPICS IN COMPUTER SCIENCE V-V-(l-3) 

Prerequisite: announced with the topic 

Special topics at freshman and sophomore level of current interest in computer science. 

CSCI 3201 COMPUTER ORGANIZATION AND ARCHITECTURE I 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: CSCI 1302 

Hardware and software concepts of digital computing systems, with emphasis on fundamental 
system software and details of hardware operation. Virtual machines, systems organization, 
digital logic, microprogramming, instruction on data formats, addressing modes, instruction 
types, flow of control, virtual memory, assembly language programming, advanced computer 
architectures (including RISC machines and parallel architectures). 

CSCI 3202 COMPUTER ORGANIZATION AND ARCHITECTURE II 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: CSCI 3201 
Continuation of CSCI 3201. 

CSCI 3321 SOFTWARE ENGINEERING CONCEPTS 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: CSCI 3450 and ENGL 3720 

Principles and techniques of designing and implementing software systems, including system life- 
cycle models, planning techniques, requirements analysis and systems specifications, human 
interfaces, design, implementation, testing, maintenance, team structure, project management. A 
student project encompassing some or all of these techniques with oral and written presentation. 

CSCI 3330 COMPARATIVE LANGUAGES 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: CSCI 2390 and CSCI 2620 
Corequisite: CSCI 3202 

Comparative study of programming languages including facilities for procedures, parameter 
passing and recursion, control structures, and storage allocation techniques. Methods of specify- 
ing syntax and semantics. Introduction to program translation. 

CSCI 3341 OPERATING SYSTEMS I 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: CSCI 3202 

Concepts, structure, and mechanisms of operating systems. Topics include processes, concurrency, 
memory management, scheduling, I/O management, disk scheduling, file management, basic 
aspects of protection and security, distributed systems. 



178 ARMSTRONG ATLANTIC STATE UNIVERSITY 



CSCI 3410 ALGORITHMS AND DATA STRUCTURES 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: CSCI 2390 and CSCI 3450 and CSCI 2620 

Introduction to design and analysis of algorithms and data structures. Topics include abstract data 
types, algorithms for the manipulation of data structures, analysis of algorithms, concepts related 
to the interaction between data structures and storage structures, algorithms for memory manage- 
ment, other fundamental algorithms in computer science. 

CSCI 3450 INTRODUCTION TO FILE STRUCTURES 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: CSCI 1302 

Introduction to concepts and techniques of accessing data in files on secondary devices including 
sequential, relative and indexed access methods, tree-structured organizations, introductory and 
relational database system concepts, external sorting. 

CSCI 3961, -72, -83 INTERNSHIP IN COMPUTER SCIENCE V-V-(l-3) 

Prerequisite: permission of instructor or department 

Practical study experiences in a variety of computing environments under the direction of faculty 

and appropriate off-campus supervisors. 

CSCI 3990 PROGRAMMING SEMINAR 0-2-1 

Prerequisite: CSCI 1302 

Development of problem solving techniques in a team environment. (Designed for but not 

restricted to, programming contests.) 

CSCI 4210 INTRODUCTION TO PARALLEL COMPUTING 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: CSCI 3201 

Introduction to parallel computing through study of hardware and software. Architecture, 
algorithms, programming languages and environments, operating systems, interconnection 
networks, and performance characteristics of parallel systems. Programming required. 

CSCI 4220 DATA COMMUNICATIONS AND COMPUTER NETWORKS 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: CSCI 3202 

Introduction to data communications and networking. Topics include communications media, 

codes, data transmission, multiplexing, protocols, layered networks. 

CSCI 4322 SOFTWARE ENGINEERING II 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: CSCI 3321 

Advanced software engineering principles, including software processes and methodologies, 
CASE tools, software metrics, software quality assurance, reusability and reengineering, and 
future trends. A major project encompassing some or all of these concepts. 

CSCI 4342 OPERATING SYSTEMS II 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: CSCI 3341 

Case studies of UNIX (tm) and/or similar operating systems. Elementary knowledge of C/C++ 

required. 

CSCI 4343 SYSTEMS PROGRAMMING UNDER UNIX (tm) 2-0-2 

Prerequisite: CSCI 2390 and CSCI 3341 

UNIX (tm) system programming techniques in C. Topics include I/O forking, pipes, signals, 
interrupts software tools, macros, conditional compilation, passing values to the compiler, lint, 
symbolic debugging, source code control, libraries. 

CSCI 4350 COMPILER THEORY 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: CSCI 3330 and CSCI 3410 

Programming language translation and basic compiler implementation techniques, formal gram- 
mars and languages, specification of syntax and semantics, lexical analysis; parsing, semantic 
processing. A major project encompassing some or all of these concepts. 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 179 



CSCI 4390 SENIOR PROJECT 0-3-3 

Prerequisite: permission of instructor or department and CSCI 3321 

Development of requirement definitions, architectural design specification, detailed design 
specification, testing plan, documentation, and implementation for the software and/or hardware 
components of a comprehensive project. Oral and written presentation of project required. 

CSCI 4610 NUMERICAL ANALYSIS 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: MATH 2072 and CSCI 1301 

Introductory numerical analysis and scientific computation. Topics include computer arithmetic, 
numerical error, polynomial interpolation, systems of linear equations, iterative methods for 
nonlinear equations, least squares approximation, numerical and integration. 

CSCI 4720 DATABASE SYSTEMS 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: CSCI 3321 

Database management system concepts and architecture; the relational, hierarchical, network, 

entity-relationship, and other models; design concepts; internal implementation techniques. 

CSCI 4820 INTRODUCTION TO ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE 4-3-3 

Prerequisite: CSCI 3330 

Basic concepts of artificial intelligence including production systems, knowledge representation, 
pattern matching, heuristic search, logical and probabilistic reasoning, and expert systems. The 
social, cultural, and economic impact of artificial intelligence. 

CSCI 4830 COMPUTER GRAPHICS 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: CSCI 3410 

Introduction to computer graphics. Topics include hardware and software, algorithms for 
computer graphics programming, windows, clipping, two- and three-dimensional transforma- 
tions, hidden line and hidden surface removal, graphics standards for hardware and software 
systems. Major project encompassing some or all of these concepts. 

CSCI 4880 INTRODUCTION TO KNOWLEDGE-BASED SYSTEMS 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: CSCI 4820 

Overview of knowledge-based systems. Knowledge representation: frames, objects, logic. 
Reasoning: rule-based, uncertainty, inexact. Architecture: production, blackboard. Major project 
encompassing some or all of these concepts. 

CSCI 4990 SPECIAL TOPICS IN COMPUTER SCIENCE V-V-(l-3) 

Prerequisite: announced with the topic 

Selected topics in some area of current interest in computer science. Possible areas include system 

simulation, graphics and microcomputers. 

CSCI 5010U COMPUTER LITERACY FOR EDUCATORS 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: MATH 1111 

Study of computers with emphasis on instructional use. Hands-on experience with the use of 

widely used commercial packages. (This course may not be counted toward the M. Ed. in 

mathematics.) 

CSCI 5990U TOPICS IN COMPUTER SCIENCE V-V-(l-3) 

Prerequisite: announced with the topic 

Selected topics in current areas of interest in computer science. 

DHED - Dental Hygiene Education 

DHED 3300 DENTAL HYGIENE RESEARCH 3-0-3 

Open to majors in dental hygiene education. Research and the scientific method with application 
to the field of dental hygiene. 



180 ARMSTRONG ATLANTIC STATE UNIVERSITY 



DHED 3310 DENTAL MANAGEMENT OF MEDICALLY 

COMPROMISED PATIENTS 3-0-3 

Open to majors in dental hygiene education. Important factors in the dental management of 
medically compromised patients. 

DHED 4400 FOUNDATIONS OF DENTAL HYGIENE EDUCATION 2-3-3 

Open to majors in dental hygiene education. An introduction to the foundations of dental hygiene 
education including educational process, licensure, and application of information systems. All 
1 100 level dental hygiene courses must have been completed. 

DHED 4401 EDUCATIONAL METHODS IN DENTAL 

HYGIENE EDUCATION I 2-3-3 

Prerequisite or corequisite: DHED 4400 

Teaching methods, program objectives, and establishment and organization of content including 

methods of evaluation, various testing strategies, and supervision in the dental hygiene clinic. 

DHED 4402 EDUCATIONAL METHODS IN DENTAL 

HYGIENE EDUCATION II 2-3-3 

Prerequisite: DHED 3300 and DHED 4400 and DHED 4401 

Learning styles and activities, teaching procedures, and the presentation of dental hygiene 

education materials. 

DHED 4403 DIRECTED AND INDIVIDUAL STUDY V-V-3 

Prerequisite: DHED 3300 and DHED 4400 and DHED 4401 

Directed individual study in an area of major interest of research with emphasis relevant to dental 

hygiene research and future career objectives. 

DHED 4410 ADVANCED PERIODONTICS 2-3-3 

Open to majors in dental hygiene education. Advanced knowledge of and current trends in 
periodontics including a clinical component. 

DHED 4490H HONORS ADVANCED PERIODONTICS 2-3-3 

Open to majors in dental hygiene education. Advanced knowledge of complex clinical skills and 
responsibilities and current trends in periodontics. Must have minimum 3.2 GPA in major field 
of study, selection by program and approval by the affiliate. 

DHYG - Dental Hygiene 

DHYG 1100 HEAD AND NECK ANATOMY 2-0-2 

Open to majors in dental hygiene. Gross anatomical relationships in the head and neck with 
emphasis on anatomy of the oral cavity and its clinical application. 

DHYG 1101 CLINICAL DENTAL HYGIENE I 2-6-4 

Open to majors in dental hygiene. Introduction to the dental hygiene profession including clinical 
procedures on mannequins and student partners. 

DHYG 1102 CLINICAL DENTAL HYGIENE II 2-9-5 

Prerequisite: DHYG 1 100 and DHYG 1 101 and DHYG 1 1 10 
Application and integration of oral prophylactic techniques. 

DHYG 1110 DENTAL ANATOMY 2-0-2 

Open to majors in dental hygiene. Nomenclature, morphology, and eruption sequence of the 
primary and secondary dentitions. 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 181 



DH YG 1 120 DENTAL ROENTGENOLOGY 2-3-3 

Prerequisite: DHYG 1 100 and DHYG 1 101 and DHYG 1110 

Fundamentals of dental radiology using intra-oral and extra-oral techniques for the taking and 

processing of radiographs. 

DHYG 1130 GENERAL AND ORAL PATHOLOGY AND ORAL HISTOLOGY 2-0-2 

Open to majors in dental hygiene. Principles of general and oral pathology in relation to common 
oral diseases. Histology and embryology of the oral cavity. 

DHYG 1 140 PERIODONTICS 2-0-2 

Open to majors in dental hygiene. Basic principles of periodontal health and disease in relation 
to the total health of the patient including concepts of etiology and periodontal pathology. 

DHYG 2201 CLINICAL DENTAL HYGIENE III 2-12-6 

Prerequisite: all 1000 level DHYG courses and CHEM 2010 and BIOL 2081 and BIOL 2082 and 
BIOL 2210 

Continuation of preceding clinical courses with emphasis on students' advancement and im- 
proved proficiency in clinical skills and integration of didactic knowledge into the clinical arena. 

DHYG 2202 CLINICAL DENTAL HYGIENE IV AND ETHICAL DECISIONS 2-15-7 
Prerequisite: DHYG 2201 

Continuation of preceding clinical courses with emphasis on students' advancement and im- 
proved proficiency in clinical skills and integration of didactic knowledge into the clinical arena. 
Jurisprudence and ethical decisions. 

DHYG 2210 PHARMACOLOGY, EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT, AND 
ANESTHESIOLOGY 2-0-2 

Open to majors in dental hygiene. Drugs and anesthetics with emphasis on those used in dentistry. 
Emergency management of clinical situations. 

DHYG 2220 DENTAL MATERIALS 1-3-2 

Prerequisite: DHYG 1101 and DHYG 1102 

Chemical, physical, and mechanical properties of dental materials and application during the 

clinical experience. 

DHYG 2230 APPLIED NUTRITION 2-0-2 

Open to majors in dental hygiene. Nutrition and nutrition education as applied to the practice of 
dental hygiene. 

DHYG 2240 PREVENTIVE PERIODONTICS 1-0-1 

Prerequisite: DHYG 1 102 and DHYG 1 140 

Prevention of periodontal diseases, treatment planning, and case presentations. 

DHYG 2250 DENTAL PUBLIC HEALTH 2-3-3 

Prerequisite: DHYG 2201 

Aspects of public health and needs of the community. Application of modern methods of dental 

health education. Field experiences. 

DHYG 2290 INDEPENDENT STUDY FOR RE-ENTRY INTO 

PROFESSIONAL DENTAL HYGIENE V-V-U-6) 

Prerequisite: permission of instructor or department 

Didactic and clinical component for updating knowledge of and skills in current dental hygiene 

practice. 



182 ARMSTRONG ATLANTIC STATE UNIVERSITY 



ECON - Economics 

ECON 1150 GLOBAL ECONOMIC PROBLEMS 3-0-3 

Impact of international trade, international finance, and foreign direct investment on various parts 
of the world with emphasis on current world economic problems. 

ECON 2030 PRINCIPLES OF ACCOUNTING I 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: eligibility for MATH 1111 

Fundamental principles and practices of accounting; the construction and interpretation of 
balance sheets and profit and loss statements; the theory of debits and credits and their application 
to the accounting process. 

ECON 2040 PRINCIPLES OF ACCOUNTING II 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: ECON 2030 

The application of accounting principles to specialized problems found in proprietorships, 
partnerships and corporations, with emphasis on cost accounting theory, modern methods of data 
processing, and the sources and applications of funds. 

ECON 2105 PRINCIPLES OF MACROECONOMICS 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: eligibility for ENGL 1 101 and eligibility for MATH 1111 

Intended to introduce students to concepts that will enable them to understand and analyze 

economic aggregates and evaluate economic policies. 

ECON 2106 PRINCIPLES OF MICROECONOMICS 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: eligibility for ENGL 1 101 and eligibility for MATH 1111 

Intended to introduce students to concepts that will enable them to understand and analyze 

structure and performance of the market economy. 

ECON 3050 INTERMEDIATE MACROECONOMICS 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: ECON 2105 

Analysis of theories of national income determination and the factors affecting employment and 

price level as presented. 

ECON 3060 INTERMEDIATE MICROECONOMICS 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: ECON 2106 

Theory of pricing, distribution, and allocation of resources in a market economy including 

production and cost theory. 

ECON 3100 MULTINATIONAL ECONOMIC ENTERPRISES 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: ECON 2105 

Evolution of multinational economic enterprises and their effect on jobs and exports/imports in 

the U.S. and on the economics of less developed countries. 

ECON 3200 INTERNATIONAL TRADE 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: ECON 2106 

Economic importance and problems of international trade including theories of international 
trade, the gains from trade, tariffs and non-tariff barrier to trade, U.S. commercial policy, 
economic integration, and trade policies of developing countries. 

ECON 3300 MONEY AND BANKING 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: ECON 2105 

Governmental and corporate finance with emphasis on fiscal and monetary policy, open market 

operations, discount policy, and the functions and problems associated with central banking. 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 183 



ECON 3400 ECONOMICS OF LABOR 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: ECON 2106 

Survey of labor economics and labor relations including organization and operation of American 

trade unionism, collective bargaining, economics of the labor market, wage theory, and economic 

distribution. 

ECON 3500 MANAGERIAL ECONOMICS 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: ECON 2106 

Examination of economic theories used to aid in decision making in the private sector including 
demand and elasticity, production and cost theory, pricing policies, linear programming, and 
capital budgeting. 

ECON 3600 MATHEMATICAL ECONOMICS 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: MATH 1 161and MATH 1950 and ECON 2105 and ECON 2106 
Examination of selected topics in economic theory using mathematics including development of 
portions of consumer and producer theory and static and dynamic models from macro theory and 
international finance. 

ECON 3630 ECONOMIC HISTORY OF THE U.S. 3-0-3 

Growth and development of economic institutions in the United States from the colonial period 
to the present with emphasis on the period since 1860. Developments in agriculture, industry, 
labor, transportation, and finance. Crosslisted as HIST 3630. 

ECON 3700 ECONOMETRICS 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: ECON 2105 and ECON 2106 and MATH 2200 

Applied econometrics including parameter estimation, inference, hypothesis testing, and prob- 
lems of designing econometric models. 

ECON 4010, -20, -30 SPECIAL TOPICS IN ECONOMICS 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: ECON 2105 

Upper-level courses not otherwise offered in the economics curriculum. Various substantive 
topics, theoretical issues and problems, with possibility to repeat with different topics. No more 
than two such courses counted in the minor. 

ECON 4210 INTERNATIONAL LAW OF EXPROPRIATION AND 
COMPENSATION 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: HIST 1 100 or POLS 1 100 
Corequisite: POLS 3260 

Examination of the traditional western view of the right of governments to expropriate foreign- 
owned property compared to the view of many third-world and Marxist governments expropriating 
property owned by U.S. citizens and corporations. Focus on arbitration and adjudication 
processes, as well as the role of the executive and legislative branches. 

ECON 4310 INTERNATIONAL FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: ECON 2105 

International monetary relations, different exchange rate systems, the balance of payments 
disequilibrium, and a survey of major international financial institutions, including IMF and the 
World Bank. 

ECON 4400 SEMINAR IN THIRD WORLD ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: ECON 2105 

Developing areas and their prospects for economic betterment and different theories of underde- 
velopment including import substitutions and export-led growth. Focus on problems presently 
facing the third world. 



184 ARMSTRONG ATLANTIC STATE UNIVERSITY 



ECON 4410 REGIONAL ECONOMICS 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: permission of instructor or department and ECON 3200 

The economic structure, growth of regions, city locations, industrial locations, the short-run 

impact of industrial change upon employment, and long-run per capita income between regions. 

ECON 4450 COMPARATIVE ECONOMIC SYSTEMS 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: ECON 2105 

Basic tenets of the major economic systems developed in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries 
and the role of government and politics along with the contributions to economic and political 
thought of such men as Adam Smith, Karl Marx, John Maynard Keynes, and Milton Friedman. 

ECON 4500 PUBLIC FINANCE 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: ECON 2105 

Application of economic principles to the study of the role of government. Emphasis on the 
reasons for and the effects of government intervention in the economy including market failure, 
public goods and externalities, public choice, and political equilibrium. Focus on taxation, public 
debt and cost benefit analysis, and some selected areas of public policy such as welfare, defense, 
and health care. 

ECON 4520, -30, -40 INTERNSHIP 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: permission of instructor or department 

Open to juniors or above. Applied economic setting using nonprofit agencies such as the Chamber 
of Commerce, as well as financial institutions and international businesses. Supervision by 
departmental instructors and agency officials. Open to transient students only with permission of 
department head. 

ECUG - Early Childhood Education 

ECUG 2020 ENVIRONMENTAL, SOCIAL, AND HEALTH ISSUES 

OF THE YOUNG CHILD 3-2-3 

Prerequisite: CEUG 1010 

Health and safety issues in early childhood emphasizing factors affecting physical, social, and 

emotional health (including disease and trauma). 

ECUG 3040 CHILDHOOD AND ADOLESCENCE 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: CEUG 2100 and ECUG 2020 

Corequisite: ECUG 3050 

Comprehensive overview of developmental process from prenatal through adolescence. Directed 

field experience. 

ECUG 3050 CURRICULUM AND METHODS P-5 3-4-3 

Prerequisite: CEUG 2100 and ECUG 2020 

Corequisite: ECUG 3040 

Development of curricula and selection of instructional strategies and materials appropriate for 

P-5 level. Directed field experience. 

ECUG 3060 LANGUAGE AND COGNITION 3-2-3 

Prerequisite: admission to teacher education 

Normal development of language with emphasis on oral language and the relationships between 

cognition, speech and language. Directed field experience. 

ECUG 3071 LITERATURE AND LANGUAGE ARTS 4-3-4 

Prerequisite: admission to teacher education and ECUG 3040 and ECUG 3050 and ECUG 3060 
Emergence of reading/writing processes during preschool, kindergarten, and early first grade 
years and the methods of presenting and integrating literature in the curriculum. Directed field 
experience. 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 185 



ECUG 3072 TEACHING OF READING 3-4-3 

Prerequisite: ECUG 3071 or permission of instructor 

Developmental reading program with emphasis on reading skills, approaches, techniques, 

materials, and evaluation including directed field experiences. Crosslisted as CEUG 3072. 

ECUG 3090 CREATIVE ACTIVITIES 3-3-3 

Prerequisite: admission to teacher education and ECUG 3040 and ECUG 3050 
The role of music, art, drama in the lives of young children. Organizing, designing, and analyzing 
creative activities and classroom environments with emphasis on integration into curriculum. 
Directed field experience. 

ECUG 3100 CONTEMPORARY SOCIAL ISSUES OF THE FAMILY 3-2-3 

Prerequisite: admission to teacher education and ECUG 3040 and ECUG 3050 

The institution of family in its cultural context as a living, dynamic system with attention to social 

context of parenting and parents as advocate for children. Directed field experience. 

ECUG 3110 PRE-KINDERGARTEN PRACTICUM 3-6-3 

Prerequisite: admission to teacher education and ECUG 3040 and ECUG 3050 

Appropriate methods for diagnosing and evaluating the young child using an integrated approach 

to curriculum planning and scheduling. Directed field experience. 

ECUG 3120 MOVEMENT AND HEALTH OF THE YOUNG CHILD 3-3-3 

Prerequisite: admission to teacher education and ECUG 3040 and ECUG 3050 

Analysis of theories and factors influencing motor development of children and the learning of 

gross and fine motor skills. Directed field experience. 

ECUG 4070 SOCIAL STUDIES 3-2-3 

Prerequisite: admission to teacher education and ECUG 3040 and ECUG 3050 

Selected themes, problems, concepts, and organization of instruction for social studies skills and 

processes needed by young children. Directed field experience. 

ECUG 4080 LIFE AND PHYSICAL SCIENCE 4-2-4 

Prerequisite: admission to teacher education 

Content and skills to plan and implement a discovery science program for young child including 

strategies, evaluation, technology, materials and current practices. Directed field experience. 

ECUG 4090 CLASSROOM MANAGEMENT 3-8-4 

Prerequisite: admission to teacher education and ECUG 3100 and ECUG 3040 and ECUG 3050 
Research knowledge base to create a well managed classroom and guide the behavior of young 
children. Directed field experience. 

ECUG 4100 STUDENT TEACHING AND SEMINAR I 2-V-6 

Prerequisite: admission to teacher education 

Corequisite:ECUG4110 

Opportunities to use knowledge and skills in a supervised P-2 public school setting. 

ECUG 4110 STUDENT TEACHING AND SEMINAR II 2-V-6 

Prerequisite: admission to teacher education 

Corequisite: ECUG 4100 

Opportunities to use knowledge and skills in a supervised 3-5 public school setting. 

ECUG 4240 PRACTICUM IN INDIVIDUAL READING INSTRUCTION 3-8-3 

Prerequisite: admission to teacher education, 
Pre- or corequisite: CEUG 3072 or ECUG 3072 



186 ARMSTRONG ATLANTIC STATE UNIVERSITY 



Directed practice in the teaching of reading with emphasis on diagnosis and teaching of needed 
reading skills. 

ECUG 4300 DIAGNOSING AND PRESCRIBING FOR LEARNING PROBLEMS 3-3-3 

Pre- or corequisite: ECUG 4090 and either CEUG 3071 or ECUG 3071 
Diagnostic and prescriptive principles underlying assessment and correction of learning prob- 
lems. Directed field experience. 

ECUG 4811 INTERNSHIP I O-V-6 

Prerequisite: permission of director of professional laboratory experiences 

Supervision for one semester by college staff for students who hold teaching positions in school 

and/or clinical settings. 

ECUG 4812 INTERNSHIP II O-V-6 

Prerequisite: permission of director of professional laboratory experiences and ECUG 481 1 
Supervision for one semester by college staff for students who hold teaching positions in school 
and/or clinical settings. 

EELE - Elementary Education 

EELE 5450U ECONOMICS EDUCATION FOR TEACHERS 3-0-3 

The study of basic microeconomic and macroeconomic concepts, methodology, resources for 
incorporating economics in the school curriculum, and teaching material development at the 
appropriate grade levels. 

EEXE - Education - Exceptional 

EEXE 3500 CHARACTERISTICS OF BEHAVIORAL DISORDERS 3-0-3 

Characteristics of the types of emotional and behavior disorders encountered among children and 
youth are reviewed along with currently accepted theories and systems for their behavioral and 
educational management. 

EEXE 3510 METHODS FOR TEACHING BEHAVIORAL DISORDERS 3-2-3 

Prerequisite: EEXE 3500 

Individualized and group methods of teaching students with behavior disorders are analyzed. An 

ecological developmental approach to behavioral and educational needs is emphasized. 

EEXE 4100 STUDENT TEACHING P-12 1-3-3 

Prerequisite: completion of all course work in program of study 

Students are placed in selected schools for one semester. Classroom and staff responsibilities are 

jointly supervised by the university staff, supervising teachers and principals in the selected 

schools. 

ENGL - English 

ENGL 0097 ENGLISH SKILLS 2-1-2 

Guidance and intensive practice in correcting errors in grammar and standard English. Editing for 
clarity and correctness, with emphasis on the student's own writing. Computer-assisted learning. 
Open to all students; especially helpful to students taking courses that require writing. 

ENGL 0098 BASIC WRITING SKILLS 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: placement according to CPE score 

Sequence for reading and writing assignments. Writing process. Practice in correcting errors in 

grammar and standard English. 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 187 



ENGL 0099 BASIC COMPOSITION 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: placement according to CPE score 

Sequence of reading and writing assignments. Writing process with emphasis on invention and 

revision. Editing skills for refining and correcting prose. CPE preparation. 

ENGL 0099T THEMATIC APPROACHES TO BASIC COMPOSITION 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: placement according to CPE score 

Corequisite: READ 0099T 

A thematic approach to teaching basic composition. Focus on sequence of reading and writing 

assignments. Writing process with emphasis on invention and revision. Editing skills for refining 

and correcting prose. CPE preparation. 

ENGL 1101 COMPOSITION I 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: Each student must attain at least one of the following prior to enrolling: (a) a score 
of at least 380 SAT Verbal and 40 or above on the TSWE (Test of Standard Written English) or 
20 on the verbal section of the ACT; or (b) a passing score on the CPE in English and in reading; 
or (c) exit learning support English and learning support reading successfully. 
A composition course focusing on skills required for effective writing in a variety of contexts, with 
emphasis on exposition, analysis, and argumentation, and also including introductory use of a 
variety of research skills. 

ENGL 1102 COMPOSITION II 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: ENGL 1101 

A composition course that develops writing skills beyond the levels of proficiency required by 
ENGL 1101, that emphasizes interpretation and evaluation, and that incorporates a variety of more 
advanced research methods. 

ENGL 1102H HONORS COMPOSITION II 3-0-3 

Advanced reading of and writing about literary texts; fulfilment of all ENGL 1 102 requirements 
at a higher level of achievement. Student must have any one of the following: admission to 
Armstrong Atlantic Honors Program; a score of three or above on AP exam; winner of an NCTE 
writing award; recommendation of English instructor and approval of department head with a 
minimum final grade of B in ENGL 1101. 

ENGL 2050 AFRICA AND THE DIASPORA 3-0-3 

Broad interdisciplinary inquiry into creative literature and social criticism as well as other forms 
of cultural expression of Africa, Caribbean, black U.S. and Europe. Interrogation of such issues 
as effects of migration and transculturation; dissent from traditional cultural formations in terms 
of gender; identity formations according to national, traditional, global values. 

ENGL 2000 ETHICS AND VALUES IN LITERATURE 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: ENGL 1102 or ENGL 1 102H 

Examination of ethical issues and human values in the context of selected literary works. Topics 
may include moral relativism and absolutism; ethical encounters with suffering; meanings and 
descriptions of evil; models of character and virtue; the role and relation of motivation and 
behavior to morality. 

ENGL 2100 LITERATURE AND HUMANITIES 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: ENGL 1 102 or ENGL 1 102H 

Examination of literature as an expression of the humanities through study of several complete 
works from at least two historical periods, two genres, and two cultures/countries. Includes an 
essay or project involving documentation. 



188 ARMSTRONG ATLANTIC STATE UNIVERSITY 



ENGL 2100H HONORS LITERATURE AND HUMANITIES 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: acceptance in honors program 

Advanced reading of and writing about literary texts; fulfilment of all ENGL 2100 requirements 
at a higher level of achievement. Recommendation of English instructor and approval of 
department head based on a minimum final grade of B in ENGL 1 102 or ENGL 1 102H. 

ENGL 2111 WORLD LITERATURE I 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: ENGL 2100 

A survey of important works of world literature from ancient times through the mid-seventeenth 

century. 

ENGL 2112 WORLD LITERATURE II 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: ENGL 2100 

A survey of important works of world literature from the mid-seventeenth century to the present. 

ENGL 2121 BRITISH LITERATURE I 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: ENGL 2100 

A survey of important works of British literature from the Old English period through the 

neoclassical age. 

ENGL 2122 BRITISH LITERATURE II 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: ENGL 2100 

A survey of important works of British literature from the romantic era to the present. 

ENGL 2131 AMERICAN LITERATURE I 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: ENGL 2100 

A survey of American literature from the pre-colonial age to the mid-nineteenth century. 

ENGL 2132 AMERICAN LITERATURE II 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: ENGL 2100 

A survey of American literature from the mid-nineteenth century to the present. 

ENGL 3010 INTRODUCTION TO LITERARY STUDIES 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: ENGL 2100 

Vocabulary and approaches of modern literary criticism, reading and interpretation of literary 

texts, and the tools of literary research and writing. 

ENGL 3020 INTRODUCTION TO COMPOSITION STUDIES 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: ENGL 2100 

Application of theories to the teaching of composition. Devising assignments, conducting class 

sessions, writing essays, and responding to academic writing. 

ENGL 3720 BUSINESS AND TECHNICAL COMMUNICATION 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: ENGL 2100 

Reporting of technical information in descriptions, instructions, memos, reports, and proposals. 

Emphasizes writing clear, persuasive prose and giving effective oral presentations. 

ENGL 4700 ADVANCED COMPOSITION 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: ENGL 2100 

Advanced study of expository and argumentative techniques. Crosslisted as LING 4700. 

ENGL 4740 CREATIVE WRITING (POETRY) 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: ENGL 2100 

Workshop format. Critique of poems by other students and professor through written statement 

and class discussion. Relevant textbook. 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 189 



ENGL 4750 CREATIVE WRITING (FICTION) 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: ENGL 2100 

Workshop format. Critique of stories by other students and professor through written statement 

and class discussion. Relevant textbook. 

ENGL 4900, -10 INDEPENDENT STUDY V-V-3 

Prerequisite: ENGL 2100 and ENGL 2121 and ENGL 2122 

Open to seniors. To be determined by student and professor. Available to transient students only 

with approval of the department head. 

ENGL 4990 INTERNSHIP V-0-(l-9) 

Prerequisite: 2.5 grade point average; supervisory staff member; recommendation of the depart- 
ment head. 

Open to juniors and above. Offered by special arrangement. Repeatable up to a maximum of nine 
credit hours. Off-campus study, work and/or research, jointly supervised by sponsoring institution 
and staff member. Nine hours credit requires forty hours a week at sponsoring institution, 6 hours 
credit requires twenty-five hours, 3 hours credit requires fifteen hours. 

ENGL 5000U SPECIAL TOPIC 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: ENGL 2100 and ENGL 2121 and ENGL 2122 
Subject announced when course is offered. 

ENGL 5200U POSTCOLONIAL LITERATURE 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: ENGL 2100 (also recommended: all of ENGL 2121 and 2122 and 2131 and 2132) 
Introduction to postcolonial literature and critical theory, including works from Africa, India, and 
the Caribbean. Literary expressions of such topics as social transformation, migration, national- 
ism, gender difference. 

ENGL 5340U LITERATURE BY WOMEN 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: ENGL 2100 

Exploration of literature written by women within its social, historical, and theoretical contexts. 
Topics such as renaissance and medieval women writers, nineteenth century novels by women, 
feminist theory and criticism, contemporary poetry by women. 

ENGL 5350U AFRICAN-AMERICAN LITERATURE 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: ENGL 2100 

African-American literature, with emphasis on historical, philosophical, and cultural contexts. 

Topics such as the oral tradition, autobiographies, the Harlem renaissance, literary criticism and 

theory. 

ENGL 5360U AMERICAN NOVEL 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: ENGL 2100 

American novel as a distinctive literary form. 

ENGL 5370U AMERICAN POETRY 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: ENGL 2100 

American poetry in the context of technological developments, philosophical movements, and 

literary currents. 

ENGL 5380U SOUTHERN LITERATURE 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: ENGL 2100 

Southern literature in its distinctive social and aesthetic contexts. 



190 ARMSTRONG ATLANTIC STATE UNIVERSITY 



ENGL 5400U BRITISH POETRY 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: ENGL 2100 

Forms and themes in British poetry with emphasis on questions of British prosody and interpre- 
tation. Topics to include the sonnet, the lyric, the dramatic monologue. Time periods to reflect 
sixteenth through twentieth-century verse. 

ENGL 5410U BRITISH NOVEL 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: ENGL 2100 

Origins and development of the British novel as a distinct literary form, examining the aesthetic, 
philosophical, and social concerns that inform selected works from the eighteenth, nineteenth, and 
twentieth centuries. 

ENGL 5440U EARLY ENGLISH LITERATURE, 

BEGINNINGS THROUGH 1603 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: ENGL 2100 

English literature from its beginnings to the fifteenth century. Writers include the Beowulf poet 
and other old English authors, early Middle English lyrics and the major figures of the fourteenth 
century (the Pearl poet, Chaucer, Langland, Gower). In alternate years, course will be devoted to 
Chaucer and his context. 

ENGL 5450U SHAKESPEARE I 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: ENGL 2100 

Tragedies, comedies, and history plays drawn from The Taming of the Shrew, The Merchant of 
Venice, The Merry Wives of Windsor, Much Ado About Nothing, As You Like It, Troilus and 
Cressida, Measure for Measure, Richard II, Henry IV, Henry V, Titus Andronicus, Julius Caesar, 
King Lear, Macbeth, Antony and Cleopatra, and Coriolanus. 

ENGL 5460U SHAKESPEARE II 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: ENGL 2100 

Tragedies, comedies, and history plays drawn from The Comedy of Errors, Love's Labor's Lost, 
Romeo and Juliet, A Midsummer Night's Dream, Twelfth Night, Hamlet, Othello, The Winter's 
Tale, The Tempest, Pericles, Cymbeline, All's Well That Ends Well, The Two Gentlemen of 
Verona, King John, Timon of Athens, Richard III, Henry VI, and Henry VIII. 

ENGL 5470U 17TH CENTURY BRITISH POETRY AND PROSE: 1603-1689 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: ENGL 2100 

Non-dramatic literature from the death of Elizabeth I to the reign of William and Mary, with an 
emphasis upon the metaphysical and classical traditions. Typical authors include Donne, Jonson, 
Herbert, Herrick, Crashaw, Vaughan, Marvell, Milton, Bacon, Burton, Brown, Bunyan, and 
Dryden. In alternate years, course will be devoted to Milton and his context. 

ENGL 5500U 18TH CENTURY BRITISH POETRY AND PROSE 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: ENGL 2100 

British poetry and prose from 1690 to 1784, with an emphasis on the philosophic and aesthetic 

concerns of the age. Authors include but are not limited to Swift, Pope, Johnson, and Fielding. 

ENGL 5520U 19TH CENTURY I: BRITISH ROMANTIC POETRY AND PROSE 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: ENGL 2100 

Examination of the works and contexts of the major British Romantic writers, including Blake, 

Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, Keats, and Shelley. 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 191 



ENGL 5530U 19TH CENTURY II: BRITISH VICTORIAN 

POETRY AND PROSE 3-0-3 

Examination of the responses of novelists, poets, and prose writers to the issues of the era, 
including the conflict between science and religion, faith in "progress" and the growth of 
industrialism, the rights of the individual and of society, and the role of the artist. 

ENGL 5540U MODERNISM 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: ENGL 2100 (also recommended: all of ENGL 2121, 2122, 2131, 2132) 

British and American fiction and poetry of early twentieth century in context of continental 

developments; possible authors include Conrad, Proust, Joyce, Woolf, Yeats, Eliot, Faulkner. 

ENGL 5550U CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: ENGL 2100 (also recommended: all of ENGL 2121, 2122, 2131, 2132) 

Fiction and/or poetry since World War II as it relates to literary traditions and cultural movements; 

topics possibly including postmodernist fiction, ethnic writers, confessional poetry. 

ENGL 5560U BRITISH DRAMA: BEGINNINGS TO 1630 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: ENGL 2100 (also recommended: all of ENGL 2121, 2122, 2131, 2132) 
Medieval and renaissance non-Shakespearean drama; Marlowe, Jonson, Beaumont, Fletcher, 
Middleton, Webster; conventions and traditions of medieval and Tudor drama. 

ENGL 5570U BRITISH DRAMA II: 1630-1800 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: ENGL 2100 (also recommended: all of ENGL 2121, 2122, 2131, 2132) 
Restoration and eighteenth-century drama; pre-restoration, late Caroline drama; Ford, Shirley, 
Dryden, Lee, Otway, Etherege, Wycherley, Congreve, Goldsmith, Sheridan. 

ENGL 5650U BRITISH, AMERICAN, AND CONTINENTAL DRAMA: IBSEN TO 
THE PRESENT 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: ENGL 2100 (also recommended: all of ENGL 2121, 2122, 2131, 2132) 
Nineteenth and twentieth-century British, American, European plays including realism, Irish 
renaissance movements, expressionism, impressionism, theatre of the absurd; Ibsen, Shaw, Yeats, 
O' Casey, Wilde, Strindberg, O'Neill, Williams. 

ENGL 5660U ANCIENT EPIC AND DRAMA 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: ENGL 2100 (also recommended: all of ENGL 2121, 2122, 2131, 2132) 

Major works of antiquity; Homer, Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides, and other significant figures. 

ENGL 5730U RHETORIC 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: ENGL 2100 

History of rhetoric from Aristotle to the present with emphasis on rhetorical analysis of literature 

and other forms of discourse. 

ENGL 5760U LITERARY NONFICTION 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: ENGL 2100 

History of the personal essay from Greek philosophers through contemporary authors. Reading 
and writing journals, letters, memoirs, biographies, autobiographies, editorials, and essays about 
travel, nature, history, current events, and other topics of "fact." Crossing genres by employing 
authors' private voices and other creative techniques in developing informative, persuasive, 
entertaining, scholarly, public inquiry. 

ENGL 5800U ADVANCED GRAMMAR 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: ENGL 2100 

Current approaches to grammar, including generative, transformational. Phonology, morphol- 
ogy, syntax. Crosslisted as LING 5800U. 



192 ARMSTRONG ATLANTIC STATE UNIVERSITY 



ENGL 5820U HISTORY OF THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: ENGL 2100 

English language from its beginnings in the fifth and sixth centuries to its worldwide expansion 
in the twentieth. Chronological consideration of language from Old to Middle to modern English. 
Phonetic, syntactic, and lexical changes emphasizing both external and internal influences. 
Crosslisted as LING 5820U. 

ENGL 5830U HISTORY OF CRITICISM 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: ENGL 2100 

Historical survey of the major theories and statements on the nature of literature and interpretation 
from the ancients through "New Criticism," examining concepts, philosophical assumptions, and 
historical figures including Plato, Aristotle, Longinus, Sidney, Dryden, Johnson, Schiller, 
Wordsworth, Coleridge, Arnold, Eliot, and Frye. 

ENGL 5840U INTRODUCTION TO LITERARY THEORY 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: ENGL 2100 

Introduction to the major currents and figures in modern critical and literary theory since the "New 
Critics," examining the basic concepts, philosophical assumptions, and historical and ideological 
contexts of figures such as Lukacs, Benjamin, Adorno, Bakhtin, Derrida, Foucault, Barthes, 
Deleuze, Jauss, DeMan, Lacan, Cixous, Irigaray, Kristeva, and Homi Bhabha. 

ENGL 5990U SENIOR CAPSTONE SEMINAR 3-0-3 

Capstone course required of English majors. Engages students in advanced critical analysis. 
Requires students to reflect on their process of study. Preparation, revision, and oral presentation 
of an original research project. Must be taken within 30 hours of graduation. 

ENGR - Engineering 

ENGR 1 100 FRESHMAN ENGINEERING 2-0-2 

Prerequisite: eligibility for ENGL 1 101 and eligibility for MATH 1111 

Orientation to the engineering process from problem formulation to the evolution of creative 
design. Surveys of the various fields of engineering, critical thinking, graphical communications, 
professional ethics, and fundamental concepts of engineering. 

ENGR 1170 ENGINEERING GRAPHICS 2-3-3 

Prerequisite: MATH 1111 

Basic graphical concepts including projection theory, sketching, solid modelling, and computer 

aided design (CAD). Development and interpretation of drawing and specification for product 

realization. 

ENGR 2200 STATICS 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: PHYS 2211 and MATH 2072 

Forces and moments; equilibrium of particles and bodies in two and three dimensions, introduc- 
tory structural analysis, friction, centroids and application to loaded members. 

ENGR 2210 DYNAMICS 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: ENGR 2200 and MATH 2072 

Kinematics of particles and rigid bodies; kinetics of particles and rigid bodies using work-energy 

and momentum methods in two-and-three dimensional motion. 

ENGR 3100 ELECTRICAL CIRCUIT ANALYSIS 3-0-3 

Prerequisite or corequisite: MATH 341 1 

Prerequisite: PHYS 2212 

Analytical tools for passive networks. Kirchhoff's laws, mesh and node analysis, network 

theorems, DC and AC circuits, Laplace transform methods. Numerical simulation of circuits via 

SPICE. 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 193 



ENGR 3111 ELECTRONICS I 3-2-4 

Prerequisite: ENGR 3100 

Introduction to P-N junction theory and the concepts of solid-state devices; development of the 
electrical characteristics of diodes and transistors; bipolar and field-effect amplifying circuits; 
operational amplifiers and analog systems. 

ENGR 3112 ELECTRONICS II 3-2-4 

Prerequisite: ENGR 31 11 

Operation and application of integrated circuits used in digital systems; gates, flip-flops, counters, 

registers and memory devices. 

ENGR 3220 MECHANICS OF MATERIALS 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: ENGR 2200 

Internal effects and dimension changes of solids resulting from externally applied loads; shear and 
bending moment diagrams, analysis of stress and strain; torsion; beam deflection; column 
stability; thin-walled vessels with applications to problems. 

ENGR 3230 FLUID MECHANICS 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: ENGR 2210 and ENGR 3301and MATH 3411 

Fluid statistics; analysis of fluid motion using the continuity, momentum, and energy conservation 

relationships; introduction to viscous flow. 

ENGR 3301 THERMODYNAMICS 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: PHYS 2211 and MATH 2072 

Basic concepts of thermodynamics; properties of substances; conservation principles; the first and 

second laws of thermodynamics; entropy; analysis of thermodynamic systems. 

ENGR 3302 THERMODYNAMICS II 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: ENGR 3301 

Gas cycles; vapor cycles; thermodynamic relationships; thermodynamic behavior in real gases; 

non-reacting gas mixtures; thermodynamics of chemical reactions. 

ENGR 3320 HEAT TRANSFER 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: ENGR 3230 and ENGR 3300 

Fundamental principles of heat transfer; steady and transient conduction in solids; introduction to 

convective heat transfer; thermal radiation. 

ENGR 3500 COMPUTER APPLICATIONS IN ENGINEERING 2-2-3 

Prerequisites: CSCI 1360 and ENGR 2210 and ENGR 3100 and ENGR 3220 
Use of digital computers to solve selected engineering problems; emphasis on problem analysis 
and solution techniques. 

ENGR 3700 ENGINEERING ECONOMIC ANALYSIS 2-0-2 

Prerequisite: MATH 1161 

Fundamental principles of basic techniques of economic analysis of engineering projects 
including economic measure of effectiveness; time value of money, cost estimation, break-even 
and replacement analysis. 

ENGR 3960 ENGINEERING INTERNSHIP V-V-V 

Prerequisite: permission of instructor or department and ENGR 1 170 and ENGR 3220 
Project will be determined, supervised and evaluated by the sponsor of the activity and the EIP 
director. Application and arrangement must be made through the department by mid-semester 
preceding the semester of internship. 



194 ARMSTRONG ATLANTIC STATE UNIVERSITY 



ETHC - Ethics 

ETHC 2000 INTERDISCIPLINARY ETHICS AND VALUES (2-3)-0-(2-3) 

Prerequisite: ENGL 1101 

An interdisciplinary examination of the relation between ethical theory and moral practice in 
specific areas of our society. This course involves several modules taught by different professors: 
the first philosophical framework module will provide an explanation and analysis of the principal 
ethical theories of the western world and subsequent modules will focus on moral issues and case 
studies in specified areas. 

FILM - Film 

FILM 3360 CRITICAL APPROACHES TO MASS CULTURE 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: ENGL 2100 or PHIL 2201 or PHIL 2251 

Examination of the theoretical and critical approaches to the study of various forms of cultural 
expression, including film television, popular literature, magazines, music, video, and radio. 
Applications of various critical methodologies to these forms. Crosslisted as COMM 3360. 

FILM 3400 HISTORY OF FILM 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: ENGL 2100 or PHIL 2201 or PHIL 2251 

History and development of cinema from the silent period to the present time. Crosslisted as 

THEA 3400. 

FILM 3490 TELEVISION THEORY AND CRITICISM 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: ENGL 2100 or PHIL 2201 or PHIL 2251 

Television theory and criticism with special emphasis on television as a media form. Crosslisted 

as THEA 3490. 

FILM 3500 INTRODUCTION TO FILM 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: ENGL 2100 or PHIL 2201 or PHIL 2251 

Emphasis on critical appreciation of film as an art form. Crosslisted as JOUR 3500 and THEA 

3500. 

FILM 3510 FILM AND LITERATURE 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: ENGL 2100 or PHIL 2201 or PHIL 2251 

Relationship between film and literature with special emphasis on the adaptation of literature into 

film. Crosslisted as THEA 3510. 

FILM 5010U TOPICS IN FILM 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: ENGL 2100 or PHIL 2201 or PHIL 2251 

Special topics in film announced when course is offered. For example, film genres, auteurs, 

critical approaches, and individual historical periods. Crosslisted as THEA 5010U. 

FILM 5020U FILM THEORY AND CRITICISM 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: ENGL 2100 or PHIL 2201 or PHIL 2251 

Introduction to the history of film theory and criticism, including classical and contemporary film 
theories and their applications to film criticism. Examination of classical film aesthetics, form, 
language realism, and formalism as well as contemporary approaches to film criticism. Applica- 
tion of various theoretical perspectives to selected filmic texts. Crosslisted as THEA 5020U. 

FOUN — Education Foundations 

FOUN 5010U EDUCATIONAL TESTS AND MEASUREMENT 3-0-3 

Beginning course in measurement which covers statistical methods, research design, and research 
problems. Students are provided experiences in the design, administration, and evaluation of 
teacher-made tests. 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 195 



FREN - French 

FREN 1001 ELEMENTARY FRENCH I 3-0-3 

D rerequisite: eligibility for ENGL 1101 

Elements of French grammar, pronunciation, and oral comprehension. Emphasis on communica- 
ion skills and listening and reading strategies. Introduction to culture and civilization of the 
French-speaking world. 

FREN 1002 ELEMENTARY FRENCH II 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: eligibility for ENGL 1 101 and FREN 1001 

Continuation of FREN 1001. Elements of French grammar, pronunciation, and oral comprehen- 
;ion. Emphasis on communication skills and listening and reading strategies. Introduction to 
culture and civilization of the French-speaking world. 

FREN 2001 INTERMEDIATE FRENCH I 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: eligibility for ENGL 1 101 and FREN 1002 

"urther development of reading, writing, listening, and speaking skills, with emphasis on oral 

)roficiency. 

FREN 2002 INTERMEDIATE FRENCH II 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: eligibility for ENGL 1 101 and FREN 2001 

Continuation of FREN 2001. Further development of reading, writing, listening, and speaking 

>kills, with emphasis on conversational French in simulated situations. 

FREN 3010 FRENCH CONVERSATION AND COMPOSITION I: CULTURE 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: FREN 2002 

Development of oral proficiency and writing skills through group discussions and guided essays, 

vith emphasis on Francophone culture. 

FREN 3020 FRENCH CONVERSATION AND COMPOSITION II: 

LITERATURE 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: FREN 2002 

Development of oral proficiency and writing skills through group discussions and guided essays, 

vith emphasis on literature. 

FREN 3030 ADVANCED GRAMMAR AND SYNTAX 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: FREN 3010 and FREN 3020 

Advanced analysis and examination of the grammar and syntax of French, stressing written usage 

hrough written grammar exercises, translations from French to English, and essays. 

FREN 3100 FRENCH CIVILIZATION I 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: FREN 3010 and FREN 3020 

Survey of the culture and civilization of France. History, geography, politics, the arts and daily 

life in France from the middle ages to the French Revolution. 

FREN 3110 FRENCH CIVILIZATION II 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: FREN 3010 and FREN 3020 

Analysis of contemporary French society and survey of the Francophone world: geography, 

sociology, politics, the arts and sciences since 1789 (the French Revolution). 

FREN 3200 SPECIAL TOPICS IN FRENCH LITERATURE 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: FREN 3030 

Subject announced at time course is offered. Includes surveys of nineteenth and twentieth century 

literature. 



196 ARMSTRONG ATLANTIC STATE UNIVERSITY 



FREN 3510, -20, -30 STUDY ABROAD IN FRANCE 5-5-9 

Prerequisite: FREN 1002 

Summer session residence and study in France in conjunction with the Studies Abroad Program 
of the University System of Georgia. Intensive instruction in language and culture and participa- 
tion in related activities. 

FREN 4010 SPECIAL GENRE 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: FREN 3200 

French Literature. Subject announced at time of course offering. 

FREN 4020 SPECIAL AUTHOR 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: FREN 3200 

French Literature. Subject announced at time of course offering. 

FREN 4900 INDEPENDENT STUDY 1-0-1 

Prerequisite: FREN 3200 

Open to transient students only with permission of the department head. 

FREN 4990 LANGUAGE INTERNSHIP V-V-l 

Prerequisite: permission of instructor or department 

Open to juniors or above. Individually designed project involving off-campus instruction at the 

elementary school level (grades 1 -6). Three preparation hours per one hour classroom instruction. 

Supervision by sponsoring institution and French faculty member and coordinated with intern, 

faculty member, and classroom teacher. Must have minimum 2.75 overall GPA; 3.0 GPA in 

French. 

GEOG - Geography 

GEOG 1100 WORLD REGIONAL GEOGRAPHY 3-0-3 

Various regions of the world - natural, cultural, political, and economic with emphasis on 
fundamental geographic information. 

GEOG 1111 PHYSICAL GEOGRAPHY 

Topics covered include earth-sun relationships, weather, climate and climate classification, soils, 
bio-geography, vegetation, and landforms with emphasis on global patterns of distribution. 
GEOG1 100 recommended. 

GEOG 2010 INTRODUCTION TO PHYSICAL GEOLOGY 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: 6 semester hours of science and GEOG 1111 

Introduction to physical geology focusing on common earth materials, dynamic processes of 
change, volcanology, seismology, plate tectonics, and the structure and evolution of the earth's 
crust and inner regions. Crosslisted as GEOL 2010. 

GEOG 2120 CULTURAL GEOGRAPHY 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: GEOG 1 100 recomended 

Topics include the concept of culture, population settlement patterns, technological origins and 
diffusions, types of economies, and the relationship of man to his environment, with emphasis 
given to the process of cultural change through time and place. GEOG1 100 recommended. 

GEOG 3100 MAN AND THE ENVIRONMENT 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: BIOL 1107 

Open to sophomores or above. Considerations of the interactions between humans and the support 

systems of the earth which are essential to their existence. Crosslisted as BIOL 3100. 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 197 



GEOG 5530U HISTORICAL BIOGEOGRAPHY 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: GEOG 1111 

Survey of interrelationships between the growth and dispersal of human populations, and of other 

living organisms, such as crop plants, domesticated animals, weeds, and microbes. 

GEOG 5870U HISTORICAL GEOGRAPHY IN NORTH AMERICA 3-0-3 

Geographic relationships in the exploration, settlement, and changing patterns of human occu- 
pancy of North America from the seventeenth century to the present. 

GEOL - Geology 

GEOL 2010 INTRODUCTION TO PHYSICAL GEOLOGY 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: eligibility for MATH 1111 

Introduction to physical geology focusing on common earth materials, dynamic processes of 
change, volcanology, seismology, plate tectonics, and the structure and evolution of the earth's 
crust and inner regions. Crosslisted as GEOG 2010. 

GEOL 3100 INTRODUCTION TO HISTORICAL GEOLOGY 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: eligibility for MATH 1111 

History of the earth. Determining geologic time, the history of life as revealed in the fossil record, 

reconstructing a chronology of events from associated rock bodies. 

GRMN - German 

GRMN 1001 ELEMENTARY GERMAN I 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: eligibility for ENGL 1101 

Elements of German grammar, pronunciation, and oral comprehension, together with an introduc- 
tion to the culture and civilization of the German-speaking world. Regular practice in language 
lab is required. 

GRMN 1002 ELEMENTARY GERMAN II 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: eligibility for ENGL 1101 and GRMN 1001 

Elements of German grammar, pronunciation, and oral comprehension, together with an introduc- 
tion to the culture and civilization of the German- speaking world. Regular practice in language 
lab is required. 

GRMN 2001 INTERMEDIATE GERMAN I 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: eligibility for ENGL 1101 and GRMN 1002 

Continuation of GRMN 1002. Continued development of reading, writing, listening, and speaking 

skills. 

GRMN 2002 INTERMEDIATE GERMAN II 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: eligibility for ENGL 1 101 and GRMN 2001 

Continued development of reading, writing, listening, and speaking skills. 

GRMN 3301 GERMAN CONVERSATION AND COMPOSITION I 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: GRMN 2002 

Conversational German in simulated situations to develop greater oral proficiency and to promote 
continued awareness of German culture. Grammar and syntax review through guided essays to 
develop writing skills in the contact language. Class entirely in German. 

GRMN 3302 GERMAN CONVERSATION AND COMPOSITION II 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: GRMN 3301 
Continuation of GRMN 3301 . 



198 ARMSTRONG ATLANTIC STATE UNIVERSITY 



GRMN 3510, -20 STUDY ABROAD IN GERMANY 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: GRMN 1002 

An 8-9 week summer semester's residence and study at the Friedrich Alexandar University of 

Erlangen, Germany. Intensive instruction in the German language and culture, complemented by 

excursions. 

GRMN 4010 SPECIAL GENRE 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: GRMN 3302 

Subject announced when course offered. Typical subjects: medieval poetry; prose, poetry, and 
drama in the seventeenth and eighteenth century; the novella in the nineteenth century; twentieth 
century prose. 

GRMN 4020 SPECIAL AUTHOR 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: GRMN 3302 

Subject announced when course offered. Typical authors: Grimmelshausen, Goethe, Schiller, 

Thomas Mann, Kafka, Grass. 

GRMN 4900 INDEPENDENT STUDY 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: GRMN 2001 

Open to transient students only with permission of the department head. 

HIST - History 

HIST 1100 POLITICAL HISTORY OF AMERICA AND GEORGIA 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: eligibility for ENGL 1101 

Origins and development of constitutional theory and its political, intellectual, and cultural impact 
on American society from the seventeenth century to the present. Emphasis is placed on the 
political history of Georgia and the principles of its constitution. Crosslisted as POLS 1 100. 

HIST 1111 CIVILIZATION I 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: eligibility for ENGL 1101 

A survey of the main currents of political, social, religious, and intellectual activity from the 

earliest civilizations to about 1500. Major civilized traditions of the world considered and 

compared. 

HIST 1112 CIVILIZATION II 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: eligibility for ENGL 1101 

A survey of the main currents of political, social, religious, and intellectual activity from about 

1500 to present. Major civilized traditions of the world considered and compared. 

HIST 1 1 12H HONORS CIVILIZATION II 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: acceptance in honors program 

Replaces HIST 1 1 15 as a component of the university honors program. While the subject matter 
is the same as HIST 1115, treatment of it varies greatly. Likewise, instruction goes beyond the 
usual lecture method, allowing students to read widely under the direction of the professor. 

HIST 2000 ETHICS AND VALUES IN HISTORY 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: ENGL 1101 

Selected issues in ethics and values considered from a historical perspective. Topics may include 

ethics and values in western and/or non-western cultures, the relationship of the good of the citizen 

to that of the state, family relationships and values, environment and bio-ethics, world view and 

ethnocentrism. 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 199 



HIST 2100 THE AFRICAN DIASPORA 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: ENGL 1101 

Overview of the origins of humanity in East Africa and its subsequent spread throughout the 
continent and the world. Emphasis on the migration of people and culture of West Africa, 
transportation to the Americas, experiences of Africans in Mexico, South America, Central 
America and the Caribbean, and twentieth century movement towards a pan-Africanism in North 
America, the Caribbean, Europe, and Africa. 

HIST 2111 HISTORY OF AMERICA TO 1877 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: ENGL 1101 

A survey of American and United States history from the pre-Columbian period through the Civil 
War and reconstruction. 

HIST 2112 HISTORY OF AMERICA SINCE 1865 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: ENGL 1101 

A survey of United States history from reconstruction to the present. 

HIST 2950 INTERNSHIP V-V-(l-3) 

Prerequisite: permission of instructor or department head 

Open only to sophomores or above. An individually designed course involving off-campus study 
and research or work in an appropriate public agency or private business. Assignments normally 
designed to require the full semester for completion. Joint supervision by the sponsoring 
organization and the academic instructor. Graded on satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis (S/U). 
Student must have at least nine hours of history courses with a history grade point average of 2.5. 
Application and credit arrangements must be made through the department in advance, normally 
by mid-semester preceding the internship. 

HIST 3000 SPECIAL TOPICS IN HISTORY 3-0-3 

Reserved for courses not in the regular curriculum which may be taught by visiting professors with 
expertise in areas of history other than those normally taught by members of the department. May 
be repeated for credit as topics vary. 

HIST 3100 HISTORY OF LATIN AMERICA TO 1850 3-0-3 

A survey of Latin American history and culture to 1850. Examines the historical origins of Latin 
American society. 

HIST 3110 HISTORY OF LATIN AMERICA SINCE 1850 3-0-3 

A survey of Latin American history and culture since 1850. Examines the causes and conse- 
quences of structural instability in Latin America today. 

HIST 3130 HISTORY OF AFRICA TO 1800 3-0-3 

African history and culture from human origins through the seventeenth century. Includes ancient 
civilizations of the Nile valley as well as eastern, southern, and western Africa. 

HIST 3140 HISTORY OF AFRICA SINCE 1800 3-0-3 

African history with emphasis on the political, economic, social, and cultural processes of the last 
two centuries with some particular attention to the emergence of new states and nations, and their 
challenges as they enter the twenty-first century. 

HIST 3200 TRADITIONAL CHINA 3-0-3 

History of Chinese civilization from ancient times to the early nineteenth century, with emphasis 
on its characteristic political, social, economic, and cultural developments. 



200 ARMSTRONG ATLANTIC STATE UNIVERSITY 



HIST 3210 MODERN CHINA 3-0-3 

History of China from the nineteenth century to the present, with emphasis on political, social, 
economic, and intellectual developments. 

HIST 3220 HISTORY OF JAPAN 3-0-3 

History of Japan from earliest times to present, with primary emphasis on its emergence as a world 
power since the late nineteenth century. 

HIST 3230 HISTORY OF THE MIDDLE EAST 3-0-3 

Middle eastern history and Islamic culture and civilization from Muhammad to the present. 
Emphasis on the background of current issues and conflicts in the region. 

HIST 3290 MEDIEVAL RUSSIA 3-0-3 

Economic, social, and political development of the Russian state from its foundation in the ninth 
century through its modernization by Peter the Great in the early eighteenth century. 

HIST 3300 MODERN RUSSIA 3-0-3 

Russian history from Peter the Great to the present, covering the major political, economic, and 
social developments of Russia in both the imperial and soviet periods as well as the collapse of 
the Soviet Union. 

HIST 3320 FRANCE 1660-1783 3-0-3 

French history from the reign of Louis XIV to the eve of the French Revolution. 

HIST 3330 MODERN GERMANY 3-0-3 

History of Germany from the mid-eighteenth century through reunification. Attention given to 
national socialism and the Third Reich. 

HIST 3360 MODERN EAST CENTRAL EUROPE 3-0-3 

History of nations between Germany and Russia in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Topics 
covered include the rise of nationalism, the gaining of independence, problems in establishing 
democracy, experience in World War II, the establishment of communist control, and post- 
communist developments. 

HIST 3420 ANCIENT HISTORY 3-0-3 

Early civilizations of the middle east, the Greek states, the Roman republic and empire, with 
emphasis on the social, political, and cultural contributions. 

HIST 3440 EUROPE IN THE MIDDLE AGES 3-0-3 

Survey of major political, economic, and cultural developments from 300-1400. 

HIST 3460 THE RENAISSANCE AND REFORMATION 3-0-3 

A study of major political, cultural, economic, and religious developments in Europe from 1400- 
1648. 

HIST 3480 EUROPE IN THE 19TH CENTURY 3-0-3 

The social, political, and intellectual directions of European history from the Congress of Vienna 
to the end of the nineteenth century. 

HIST 3490 EUROPE IN THE 20TH CENTURY 3-0-3 

Major developments in Europe since 1900. 

HIST 3510 POPULAR CULTURE IN THE U.S. 3-0-3 

Examination of the major trends in the news media, popular literature, entertainment, and 
recreational activities in the United States. 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 201 



HIST 3570 AMERICAN MILITARY HISTORY 3-0-3 

History of warfare and military technique in their social, economic, and political contexts, with 
emphasis on the American military traditions. 

HIST 3630 ECONOMIC HISTORY OF THE U.S. 3-0-3 

Growth and development of economic institutions in the United States from the colonial period 
to the present, with emphasis on the period since 1860. Developments in agriculture, industry, 
labor, transportation, and finance. Crosslisted as ECON 3630. 

HIST 3640 AMERICAN SOCIAL HISTORY 3-0-3 

An examination of American social patterns. Topics may include economics, demographics, 
immigration, gender, politics, and religion. 

HIST 3710 COLONIAL AND REVOLUTIONARY AMERICA 3-0-3 

Discoveries of the new world and the settlement and growth of the English colonies of North 
America, triumph over France in the new world, the drastic change in British colonial policy and 
the rise of the American opposition to it, the achievement of independence, and the establishment 
of the United States under the constitution. 

HIST 3730 JACKSONIAN AMERICA (1815-1848) 3-0-3 

Prerequisites: HIST 21 1 1 and HIST 2112 

United States history between 1815 and 1848 with attention to economic, political, social, and 
intellectual developments. Topics include the growth of a more democratic political culture; the 
market revolution and the commercialization of society; mass immigration and labor; revivalism, 
reform, manifest destiny, and the beginnings of modern American culture. 

HIST 3740 WOMEN IN AMERICAN HISTORY 3-0-3 

Examination of the changing political, social, and economic roles of American women from the 
colonial times to the present. Emphasis on the pre-Civil War feminist reform movements, 
women's broader social and economic roles after the war, increased awareness of the need for 
political power, the mid-twentieth century revolution, and the particular experiences of southern 
women. 

HIST 3750 CIVIL WAR AND RECONSTRUCTION 3-0-3 

Causes and significance of the American Civil War, with substantial consideration of military 
campaigns; political, economic, and social aspects of reconstruction. 

HIST 3760 U.S. HISTORY 1877-1917 3-0-3 

Presentation of the major subjects of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, including 
the emergence of a national economy, its theory and policies; partisan and reform politics; 
American society and social thought; and territorial aggrandizement. 

HIST 3770 U.S. HISTORY 1917-1960 3-0-3 

Analysis of the institutions and forces that molded life in the United States from 1917 to 1960. 

HIST 3780 POLITICAL PARTIES AND POLITICAL CULTURE 

IN 20TH CENTURY AMERICA 3-0-3 

Prerequisites: HIST 21 1 1 and HIST 2112 

Emergence of modern political parties in the United States from 1896 through the 1970s. Topics 
include gilded age politics and the urban political machine; the progressive presidents; FDR, the 
New Deal, and World War II; cold war politics; Lyndon Johnson and the Great Society; the war 
in Vietnam; the Nixon years. 



202 ARMSTRONG ATLANTIC STATE UNIVERSITY 



HIST 3790 U.S. HISTORY SINCE 1960 3-0-3 

Examination of the society of the United States since 1960, with special emphasis given to the 
major social and cultural trends. 

HIST 3800 INTRODUCTION TO PUBLIC HISTORY 3-0-3 

An introduction to the basic historiographic and anthropological approaches used in public history 
and a survey of the different disciplines such as archaeology, architecture, folklife, decorative arts, 
museum studies, and preservation which comprise public history. Crosslisted as ANTH 3800 and 
PBHS 3800. 

HIST 3820 INTRODUCTION TO ARCHAEOLOGY 3-0-3 

Survey of archaeology using cross-cultural examples. Focus on history, basic techniques, 
concepts, theories, and types of research. Crosslisted as ANTH 3820 and PBHS 3820. 

HIST 3900 AFRICAN-AMERICAN HISTORY TO 1865 3-0-3 

Prerequisites: HIST 21 1 1 and HIST 2112 

Introduction to West African cultural antecedents, attempts at acculturation of Africans into Euro- 
American culture, the resiliency of African traditions, the dynamics of family and community, the 
abolition of slavery, and the struggle for equality. 

HIST 3910 AFRICAN-AMERICAN HISTORY SINCE 1865 3-0-3 

Prerequisites: HIST 21 1 1 and HIST 21 12 

Second half of the African-American survey. Explores the different approaches of African- 
Americans to realize liberty, citizenship, due process, and suffrage. Follows the struggle of 
African-Americans from 1 865 to the present. 

HIST 3990 FIELDWORK IN HISTORY V-V-(l-3) 

Prerequisite: permission of instructor or department 

Field-trip based courses or extended site visits, abroad or in the United States. Research, reading, 
and written assignment tailored to the specific nature of each study tour or site visitation. (Specific 
area of study indicated on transcript. ) Course may be repeated as topics vary, but no more than five 
hours counted among the 40 hours required for the major in history. Offered only by special 
advance arrangement with department. 

HIST 4500 HISTORICAL METHODS 2-2-3 

Introduction to the nature and methods of historical research, treating problems of investigation, 
data organization, and writing through discussion and actual research experience. Required of all 
history and public history majors. 

HIST 4811, -12 INDEPENDENT STUDY IN NON- WESTERN HISTORY 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: HIST 4500 

Available only by special arrangement with the history department, made in advance. Ask in the 

department for specific information. 

HIST 4831, -32 INDEPENDENT STUDY IN EUROPEAN HISTORY 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: HIST 4500 

Available only by special arrangement with the history department, made in advance. Ask in the 

department for specific information. 

HIST 4851, -52 INDEPENDENT STUDY IN AMERICAN HISTORY 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: HIST 4500 

Available only by special arrangement with the history department, made in advance. Ask in the 

department for specific information. 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 203 



HIST 4871, -72 INDEPENDENT STUDY IN PUBLIC HISTORY 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: HIST 4500 

Available only by special arrangement with the history department, made in advance. Ask in the 

department for specific information. Crosslisted as PBHS 4871, -72. 

HIST 4900 SEMINAR IN NON-WESTERN HISTORY 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: HIST 4500 

Detailed analysis of a specific problem, theme, or topic in non-western history. Writing-intensive. 
Format varies: colloquia with extensive readings and the writing of several critical essays, or a 
research class with a formal research paper. 

HIST 4910 SEMINAR IN RUSSIAN HISTORY 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: HIST 4500 

Detailed analysis of a specific problem, theme, or topic in Russian history. Writing-intensive. 
Format varies: colloquia with extensive readings and the writing of several critical essays, or a 
research class with a formal research paper. 

HIST 4920 SEMINAR IN EUROPEAN HISTORY 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: HIST 4500 

Detailed analysis of a specific problem theme, or topic in European history. Writing-intensive. 
Format varies: colloquia with extensive readings and the writing of several critical essays, or a 
research class with a formal research paper. 

HIST 4930 SEMINAR IN AMERICAN HISTORY 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: HIST 4500 

Detailed analysis of a specific problem, theme, or topic in American history. Writing-intensive. 
Format varies: colloquia with extensive readings and the writing of several critical essays, or a 
research class with a formal research paper. 

HIST 4950 PROFESSIONAL INTERNSHIP V-V-(l-3) 

Prerequisite: HIST 4500 

An individually designed course project involving off-campus study and research in a government 
or private agency. Supervision by sponsoring agency and faculty advisor. May be repeated for 
credit. Graded on a satisfactory /unsatisfactory (S/U) basis; credited among upper level courses but 
not part of the minimum 27 hours required for the major. Application and credit arrangements 
should be made through the department in advance, normally by mid-semester preceding the 
semester of internship. Must have a minimum grade point average in all history courses and 12 
hours of upper level history including HIST 4500. 

HIST 4960 AMERICAN HISTORIOGRAPHY 3-0-3 

A study of the writing of American history with emphasis on the historical philosophies and 
interpretations of the major schools of thought as well as individual historians. 

HIST 4970 EUROPEAN HISTORIOGRAPHY 3-0-3 

A study of the writing of history in the western cultural tradition, with an emphasis on the historical 
philosophies, interpretations, and problems raised by major modern historians. 

HIST 4990 SENIOR THESIS IN HISTORY 0-6-3 

Prerequisite: HIST 4500 

Open only to seniors. Directed research under the supervision of a permanent member of the 
history department. Application to the academic affairs committee of the history department by 
mid-term of semester (excluding summer) before enrollment in course. Completed thesis 
submitted four weeks prior to end of semester, and oral presentation to the history department 
faculty. If the department faculty approve the completed thesis for honors, the degree designation 
on the student's transcript will be noted "Honors in History." Consult the department office for 



204 ARMSTRONG ATLANTIC STATE UNIVERSITY 



details. Students must have completed 15 semester hours of upper division history courses, 
including HIST 4500, and have a 3 .5 grade point average in all history courses. May not be counted 
in the 27 hours required for the major. This course meets the "honors in the major" component for 
students in the university honors program. 

HIST 5300U HISTORY OF RUSSIAN AND SOVIET FOREIGN POLICY 3-0-3 

Examination of topics of Russian and soviet foreign policy from the end of the tsarist period to 
the present. Analysis of the effect on the international system of the collapse of the Soviet Union 
and the place of Russia in the world today. 

HIST 5450U TOPICS IN MEDIEVAL HISTORY 3-0-3 

Study of a topic in medieval history such as the crusades, Byzantine history, or other medieval 
subjects based on available primary source material. May be repeated as topics vary. 

HIST 5470U FRENCH REVOLUTION AND NAPOLEON 3-0-3 

Background and events of the French Revolution and the career of Napoleon, considering various 
and different historical interpretations. 

HIST 5480U TOPICS IN EUROPEAN HISTORY 3-0-3 

Selected topics in European history. May be repeated as topics vary. 

HIST 5500U TOPICS IN BRITISH HISTORY 3-0-3 

Selected topics in the history of Great Britain and Ireland. May be repeated as topics vary. 

HIST 5510U HISTORY OF NORTH AMERICAN INDIANS 3-0-3 

Investigation of the aboriginal cultures of North America from the Arctic to the Rio Grande, 
including origins, distribution, ecology, and interrelationships, past through present. 

HIST 5540U TOPICS IN U.S. FOREIGN RELATIONS 3-0-3 

Study of American objectives and policies in foreign affairs. May be repeated as topics vary. 

HIST 5560U TOPICS IN THE HISTORY OF GEORGIA 3-0-3 

Topics in the history of Georgia with emphasis on political, economic, social, religious, and 
cultural trends in the context of the south and the nation. 

HIST 5565U TOPICS IN THE HISTORY OF AMERICAN REFORM 3-0-3 

Prerequisites: HIST 21 1 1 and HIST 2112 

Topics in the history of American reform emphasizing the evolution of social policy as it applies 

to class, gender, ethnicity, and religion. May be repeated as topics vary. 

HIST 5570U TOPICS IN THE HISTORY OF THE AMERICAN SOUTH 3-0-3 

Topics including economic, cultural, social, and political history of the south with emphasis on 
those factors that made the south a unique section of the nation. 

HIST 5640U TOPICS IN THE HISTORY OF TECHNOLOGY AND CULTURE 3-0-3 

Examination of developments in the history of technology, emphasizing relationships among 
European and American technologies, societies, and cultures. May be used for European or 
American history credit, depending upon the emphasis of the course. 

HIST 5650U TOPICS IN AFRICAN-AMERICAN HISTORY 3-0-3 

Prerequisites: HIST 21 1 1 and HIST 21 12 

Topics in the history of African- American people emphasizing their social, economic, political, 

and regional experiences. May be repeated for credit as topics vary. 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 205 



HIST 5700U AMERICAN MATERIAL CULTURE 2-1-3 

Prerequisite: permission of instructor or department 

Introduction to the study of North American and Caribbean culture, ordinarily focused on the 
eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. Architecture, cemeteries, landscape, dress, music, art, 
foodways, status, gender, and ethnic identifiers may provide examples. Crosslisted as ANTH 
5700U and PBHS 5700U. 

HIST 5720U HISTORICAL ARCHAEOLOGY 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: HIST 3820 or PBHS 3820 or ANTH 3820 

The historical archaeology of the new world from the first arrival of Europeans and Africans to 
about 1 800. Attention focused on the south and the Caribbean, but other frontier contexts may also 
be included. Emphasis given to anthropological archaeology as a perspective for the writing of 
history and as a sub-field within public history. Crosslisted as ANTH 5720U and PBHS 5720U. 

HIST 5730U FIELDWORK IN HISTORICAL ARCHAEOLOGY 0-12-6 

Prerequisite: HIST 3820 or PBHS 3820 or ANTH 3820 

Application of archaeological methods to a specific field project. Excavation techniques, 
surveying and map making, data collecting and recording, and the interpretation of archaeological 
data. May be repeated for credit. Crosslisted as ANTH 5730U and PBHS 5730U. 

HIST 5740U PRACTICUM IN ARCHAEOLOGY 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: HIST 3800 or PBHS 3800 or ANTH 3800 

Application of analytical techniques to a specific research problem. Individual research requiring 
artifact analysis, techniques from anthropological history, use of computer technologies, curation 
or conservation of archaeological data. May be repeated as topics vary. Crosslisted as ANTH 
5740U and PBHS 5740U. 

HIST 5750U FOLKLIFE 2-2-3 

Prerequisite: ANTH 1102 

The study of the creation and persistence of tradition in societies and of the process of change as 
demonstrated in such aspects as narrative, music, song, celebration, festival, belief, and material 
culture. Emphasis on understanding the multi-ethnic nature of the traditions in American life. 
Crosslisted as ANTH 5750U and PBHS 5750U. 

HIST 5770U ORAL HISTORY 1-4-3 

Prerequisite: HIST 4500 

The study of how to prepare and conduct oral history interviews; how to transcribe, log, and index 
oral history recordings; and how to use oral history collections in writing research papers. 
Crosslisted as PBHS 5770U. 

HIST 5800U AMERICAN ARTS IN HISTORICAL PERSPECTIVE 3-0-3 

Survey of American visual arts including painting, sculpture, architecture, and the decorative arts. 
Examines artistic material culture as art and as a means to critical understanding of American life. 
Crosslisted as PBHS 5800U. 

HIST 5810U TOPICS IN ARCHITECTURAL HISTORY 2-1-3 

Selected topics in architectural history, including various styles of architecture (Georgian, federal, 
neoclassical, eclectic, and modern), and vernacular architecture. Recording techniques, research 
strategies, theoretical approaches, landscape architecture, field trips, and visiting lecturers. May 
be repeated as topics vary. Crosslisted as PBHS 5810U. 



206 ARMSTRONG ATLANTIC STATE UNIVERSITY 



HIST 5890U TOPICS IN PUBLIC HISTORY V-V-3 

Special topic in the field of public history defined by the instructor. Taught as a colloquium or 
seminar. Crosslisted as PBHS 5890U. 

HIST 5940U FIELDWORK IN HISTORY V-V-(l-3) 

Prerequisite: permission of instructor or department 

Field-trip based and/or engagement in extended site visits, whether abroad or in the United States. 
Research, reading, and written assignments tailored to the specific nature of each study tour or site 
visitation. Specific area of study indicated on student transcript. Course may be repeated for credit 
as topics vary, but no more than five hours counted among the 40 hours required for the major. 
Offered only by special advance arrangement with the department. 

HLPR - Health Professions 

HLPR 1100 INTRODUCTION TO HEALTH CARE AND MEDICAL 
TERMINOLOGY 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: eligibility for ENGL 1 101 and eligibility for MATH 1111 

Introduction to concepts necessary for effective, ethical performance in the health care delivery 

system. Terminology of medicine. Basic foundation course. 

HLPR 1200 MULTIDISCIPLINARY SKILLS IN HEALTH PROFESSIONS 1-3-2 

Prerequisite: eligibility for ENGL 1 101 and eligibility for MATH 1111 

Emphasis on basic patient care skills common to all health professions. Patient and health 

practitioner safety is emphasized in class laboratory exercises. Crosslisted as NURS 1200. 

HLPR 2000 INTRODUCTION TO RESEARCH IN THE HEALTH 

PROFESSIONS 2-0-2 

Prerequisite: ENGL 1 102 and MATH 1111 

Introduction to methods of scientific research in the health professions. Steps of the research 

process, critique of research reports, completion of literature review. 

HLPR 2400 PRINCIPLES OF PHARMACOLOGY 2-0-2 

Prerequisite: CHEM 1151/1151L and CHEM 1152/1 152L and BIOL 2082 
Principles of pharmacology to include routes of drug administration, absorption, distribution, 
tissue accumulation, metabolism, and excretion. Additional topics include pharmacodynamics, 
drug interactions, toxicology, and changes across the life span. 

HLPR 4200 INTERDISCIPLINARY HEALTH PROFESSIONS SEMINAR 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: MATH 2200 and either HLPR 2000 or DHED 3300 

Open only to seniors in health professions programs. Interdisciplinary analysis of health care 

issues and research. 

HONS - Honors 

HONS 2000 HONORS TOPICS IN GLOBAL PERSPECTIVES (2-0-2) or (3-0-3) 

Prerequisite: admission to honors program; other prerequisites may vary according to instructor 
Designed to offer a topical look at global issues, with topics changing on an annual basis. Course 
may be repeated for credit as topics vary, but may be counted to fill honors in the core requirement 
only once. 

HSCA - Health Services Administration 

HSCA 3601 HEALTH CARE FINANCE I 3-0-3 

Introduction to health service organization financial statements, basic managerial accounting 
practices, forms of business organization, time value of money, and reimbursement methods in 
health care. 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 207 



HSCA 3602 HEALTH CARE FINANCE II 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: HSCA 3601 

Valuation concepts, cost of capital, capital budget analysis, risk, working capital management, 

financial statement analysis, and forecasting. 

HSCA 4610 HEALTH CARE ECONOMICS 3-0-3 

Microeconomic approach to the market for health services and macroeconomic applications to 
health policy formulation and evaluation. 

HSCA 4620 HEALTH CARE ADMINISTRATION 3-0-3 

Administrative theories and concepts in health service organizations and systems. 

HSCA 4630 HEALTH INFORMATION SYSTEMS 3-0-3 

Role and development of information systems in health programs. Emphasis on information based 
planning models, sources of health related data, and utilization of data for decision making. 

HSCA 4640 MANAGED CARE CONCEPTS 3-0-3 

Overview of managed health care plans and systems. Emphasis on provider and payor sponsored 
systems, methods of financing and reimbursement, and common operational issues. 

HSCA 4650 LONG TERM CARE MANAGEMENT 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: HSCC 3120 and HSCA 4610 and HSCA 4620 

Issues particular to care of residents and management in a long term care setting. Synthesis of 

topics studied elsewhere including accreditation standards, human resource issues. 

HSCA 4901, -2 HEALTH SCIENCE PRACTICUM IN 

LONG TERM CARE I AND II V-V-3 

Prerequisite: permission of instructor or department 

Two semesters (6 hours) of on-site experience under tutelage of licensed nursing home adminis- 
trator. Development of philosophy integrating clinical and administrative aspects of long term 



HSCA 4920 HEALTH SERVICES ADMINISTRATION PRACTICUM V-V-4 

Prerequisite: permission of instructor or department 
On-site experience in health services administration. 

HSCA 5650U SEMINAR IN LONG TERM CARE ADMINISTRATION 1-0-1 

Statutory guidelines, facility licensing requirements, Medicare/Medicaid requirements for reim- 
bursement, and items necessary for successful completion of Georgia state nursing home 
administrator licensure examination. 

HSCC - Health Science Core 

HSCC 2110 HEALTH AND HUMAN DEVELOPMENT 3-0-3 

Analysis of critical stages in human development from the perspective of health enhancement and 
disease prevention. 

HSCC 3000 HEALTH ISSUES AND RESOURCES 3-0-3 

Formulation and facilitation of practical modes of collaboration and cooperation among health 
agencies, levels of program personnel, and provider organizations. 

HSCC 3010 HEALTH COMMUNICATION STRATEGIES 2-0-2 

Various methods and techniques for providing health information and fostering communication 
among health service providers, payers, and consumers. 



208 ARMSTRONG ATLANTIC STATE UNIVERSITY 



HSCC 3120 HEALTH POLICY AND LAW 3-0-3 

Overview of health policy-making process and legal environment of health care. Issues pertinent 
to policy deliberation, formation, evaluation, and Statutory and administrative law. 

HSCC 3140 EPIDEMIOLOGY 3-0-3 

Distribution and determinants of health and disease in defined populations with applications to 
clinical, environmental, and infectious disease sellings. 

HSCC 4010 HEALTH PLANNING AND MARKETING 4-0-4 

Prerequisite: HSCC 3000 and HSCC 3140 

Study of health planning framework and the investigation o\ implementation, marketing, and 

evaluation proce- 

HSCG - Health Science Gerontology 

HSCG 5500U SURVEY OF GERQN rOLOGl 3-0-3 

Introduction to the emotional, physiological, and social changes associated « ith the aging process 
and their effects on health. 

HSCG 55101 HEALTHY \(,IN(, 3-0-3 

Principles of holistic aging: spiritual, social, emotional, occupational, physical, and motivational 
needs of the elderls . 

HSCG 5520L GERONTOLOC ^ PR U IK I M \ -\ -3 

Prerequisite: permission o\ instructor or department 

Practical experience tailored to the student's interest in collaboration with a faculty member and 

qualified site supervisor. 

HSCP - Health Science Public Health 

HSCP 3710 WORKSITE WELLNESS ^ND SAFETY 3-0-3 

Introduction to the multiple skills needed to design, implement and evaluate health promotion and 
wellness programs in various settings. 

HSCP 3720 ETHICAL THEORIES kND MORAL ISS1 ES 

IN PUBLIC HEALTH 3-0-3 

Theories and issues in the ethics of public health, health care, and health promotion. Contemporarv 
issues, such as health bioethics. DNA manipulation, contraception, and end-of-life decisions. 

HSCP 3730 HEALTH PROMOTION THEORY 3-0-3 

Individual and environmental forces generating opposing viewpoints regarding public health 
needs and concerns. 

HSCP 3740 HEALTH PROMOTION METHODS 3-0-3 

Selection of methods and media best suited for successful implementation of program plans for 
specific populations. 

HSCP 3750 TOPICS IN PUBLIC HEALTH 3-0-3 

Major public health topics and their effects on modern society. 

HSCP 3770 HEALTH/SEXUALITY EDUCATION 3-0-3 

Investigation of human sexuality and its effects on health. 

HSCP 3780 HEALTH AND DRUG EDUCATION 2-0-2 

Investigation of legal and illegal drugs including chemical dependency, abuse, physiological and 
psychological effects, rehabilitation methods, and costs to societ) . 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 209 



HSCP 3790 HEALTH/FITNESS MANAGEMENT 3-0-3 

Art and science of managing health, wellness, and fitness centers. 

HSCP 4000 INDEPENDENT STUDY IN HEALTH SCIENCE V-V-3 

Prerequisite: permission of instructor or department 
Independent study in an area of interest in health. 

HSCP 4900 HEALTH SCIENCE PRACTICUM V-V-5 

Prerequisite: permission of instructor or department 
On-site experience in the student's area of interest. 

HSCP 5550U NUTRITION 3-0-3 

Basic concepts of nutrition as major component to the enhancement of health. 

HSCP 5700U ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH ISSUES 3-0-3 

Historical, contemporary, and prospective environmental factors that impact public health status. 

HUMN - Humanities 

HUMN 2960 FOREIGN LANGUAGE AND CULTURE V-V-(l-15) 

Prerequisite: permission of the dean of the College of Arts and Sciences 

Offered as part of a study abroad or global studies program. Instruction in language and/or culture 

of a foreign country or people. Crosslisted as SSCI 2960. 

JOUR - Journalism 

JOUR 3270 JOURNALISM LAB 0-3-1 

Prerequisite: ENGL 1102 

Practical experience in journalism through work on approved campus publications. Only one hour 

of credit may be earned per term. Repeatable up to 3 hours. 

JOUR 3430 JOURNALISTIC WRITING AND EDITING 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: ENGL 2100 

Techniques of modern journalism; emphasis on writing and editing for newspapers and maga- 
zines. 

JOUR 3470 BASIC TV PRODUCTION 3-3-3 

Study of the theory and practice of television production styles, forms and concepts. Special 
emphasis on the critical appreciation of electronic communication techniques. 

JOUR 3500 INTRODUCTION TO FILM 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: ENGL 2100 or PHIL 2201 or PHIL 2251 

Emphasis on the critical appreciation of film as an art form. Crosslisted as FILM 3500 and THEA 

3500. 

JOUR 4000 TOPICS IN JOURNALISM 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: JOUR 3430 

A seminar on the impact of the media on the world today. Emphasis on rights and responsibilities 

of journalists, censorship, media control, propaganda and other current issues. 

LATN - Latin 

LATN 1001 ELEMENTARY LATIN I 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: eligibility for ENGL 1 101 

Essentials of grammar and readings from selected Latin authors. 



210 ARMSTRONG ATLANTIC STATE UNIVERSITY 



LATN 1002 ELEMENTARY LATIN II 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: eligibility for ENGL 1101 and LATN 1001 
Essentials of grammar and readings from selected Latin authors. 

LATN 2001 INTERMEDIATE LATIN I 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: eligibility for ENGL 1101 and LATN 1002 

Further readings in Latin literature with special emphasis on Vergil and Ovid. 

LATN 2002 INTERMEDIATE LATIN II 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: eligibility for ENGL 1101 and LATN 2001 

Further readings in Latin literature with special emphasis on Vergil and Ovid. 

LATN 3000 READINGS IN LATIN 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: LATN 2002 

Readings from the 2000 years of Latinity from Plautis to the recent encyclicals. 

LATN 3010 READINGS IN LATIN II 3-0-3 

Readings in Latin poetry. May include Horace, Catullus, Ovid, Propertius, and Tibullus. 

LATN 3020 OVID 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: LATN 2001 

Readings from the Metamorphoses with emphasis on familiar mythology and other selected 

works. 

LATN 3351, -2, -3 STUDY ABROAD IN ROME AND ATHENS 9-0-9 

Prerequisite: LATN 1002 

An 8-9 week summer semester's residence and study in Rome and Athens in conjunction with the 
studies abroad program of the University System of Georgia. Through visits to monuments, 
museums, and classical ruins, and on excursions to Crete, Delphi, Ostia, Tivoli, Tarquinia, and 
Frascati, the student experiences first hand the reality of life in the ancient world. Crosslisted as 
CLAS3351,-2, -3. 

LATN 3960 LATIN LANGUAGE AND CULTURE IN ROME 9-0-9 

Prerequisite: LATN 2001 

Composition outside of class and travel to cultural sites. 

LATN 4010 VERGIL 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: LATN 2001 

Readings from the Aeneid with emphasis on Books II, IV, VI, and VIII, and other selected works. 

LING - Linguistics 

LING 4700 ADVANCED COMPOSITION 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: ENGL 2100 

An understanding of the complex interaction of form and content when writing prose. Developing 
an individual voice along with cultural context, audience awareness, and meaning. Crosslisted as 
ENGL 4700. 

LING 5000U TOPICS IN LINGUISTICS 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: ENGL 2100 

Seminar in topics of theoretical and applied linguistics. Course may be taken more than once for 

credit as topics change. 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 211 



LING 5800U ADVANCED GRAMMAR 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: ENGL 2100 

Current approaches to grammar, including generative, transformational. Phonology, morphol- 
ogy, syntax. Crosslisted as ENGL 5800U. 

LING 5820U HISTORY OF ENGLISH LANGUAGE 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: ENGL 2100 

English language from its beginnings in the fifth and sixth centuries to its worldwide expansion 
in the twentieth. Chronological consideration of language from Old to Middle to Modern English. 
Phonetic, syntactic, and lexical changes emphasizing both external and internal influences. 
Crosslisted as ENGL 5820U. 

LMUG - Library Media 

LMUG 3000 INTRODUCTION TO MEDIA PROFESSIONS 2-2-2 

Examination of the role, functions and services of different types of libraries and information 
centers including directed field experiences. 

LMUG 3100 REFERENCE SOURCES 3-2-3 

Basic reference sources, electronic sources, searching strategies, and directed field experiences. 

LMUG 3200 CATALOGUING AND CLASSIFICATION 3-2-3 

Basic principles of cataloguing and classification of multi-media materials combined with 
practical experience. 

LMUG 4100 MEDIA SELECTION 3-1-3 

Selection, evaluation and utilization of various types of media, based on fundamental principles 
and objectives. Includes field experiences. 

LMUG 4200 ADMINISTRATION OF INFORMATION CENTERS 3-2-3 

Prerequisite: LMUG 3000 and LMUG 3100 and LMUG 3200 and LMUG 4100 

Study of organization and administration of all types of information centers. Includes field 

experiences. Concurrent enrollment in LMUG 4250 recommended. 

LMUG 4250 MEDIA INTERNSHIP 1-6-4 

Prerequisite: LMUG 3000 and LMUG 3100 and LMUG 3200 and LMUG 4100 

Corequisite: LMUG 4200 

Supervised experiences in library/media center, or other appropriate setting. 

LSLI - Library Science 

LSLI 1100 INTRODUCTION TO LIBRARY RESEARCH AND MATERIALS 1-1-1 

An orientation to the library. Students will learn to access information in a variety of formats. 

LSLI 3110 LIBRARY RESEARCH AND ELECTRONIC RESOURCES 2-2-2 

Introduction to searching appropriate printed and electronic databases. Internet resources are 
included. Directed to the student's subject interest. 

LSLI 3120 INFORMATION RESOURCES IN HUMANITIES 1-1-1 

Basic and advanced reference materials and search techniques in the humanities. 

LSLI 3130 INFORMATION RESOURCES IN SOCIAL SCIENCES 1-1-1 

Basic and advanced reference materials and search techniques in the social sciences. 



212 ARMSTRONG ATLANTIC STATE UNIVERSITY 



LSLI 3140 INFORMATION RESOURCES IN SCIENCES 1-1-1 

Basic and advanced reference materials and search techniques in the sciences. 

MAED - Mathematics Education 

MAED 5500U TEACHING MATHEMATICS WITH TECHNOLOGY 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: MATH 1113 

Use of graphing calculators and special computer software to teach algebra, geometry, advanced 

algebra, and precalculus. 

MAED 5940U TEACHING OF MIDDLE SCHOOL/GENERAL 

MATHEMATICS 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: MATH 1113 

The teaching of traditional topics, such as fractions, decimals, percentage, measurement, informal 
geometry, algebraic structures, probability, and statistics. Cooperative learning in an activity- 
based problem solving environment; incorporation of drill and practice in necessary skills with 
appropriate games and exercises. 

MATH - Mathematics 

MATH 0090 MATH STUDY SKILLS 1-0-1 

Strategies for learning mathematics, improving math study skills, and reducing math anxiety. 
Designed for students who have difficulty in basic mathematics and algebra. 

MATH 0097 INTRODUCTORY ALEGBRA 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: placement according to CPE score 

Real numbers, variable expressions, solving equations and inequalities, applications, graphing 

straight lines, polynomials, factoring, and radical expressions. 

MATH 0099 INTERMEDIATE ALGEBRA 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: placement according to CPE score 

Rational expressions, factoring, linear equations and inequalities, quadratic equations, word 

problems, graphs of linear functions, rational exponents, and radicals. 

MATH 1 1 1 1 COLLEGE ALGEBRA 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: Students must satisfy one of the following: (a) fulfillment of the CPC and a score of 
at least 420 on the SAT math; (b) a passing grade on the math component of the CPE; (c) successful 
exit from MATH 0099. 

Placement Recommendations: Some students who satisfy the prerequisites for MATH 1111 
nonetheless need to reinforce their mathematical skills in a learning support mathematics course 
before taking MATH 1 1 1 1 . In particular, if any of the following is true, students should consider 
enrolling in MATH 0099: (a) the student did not complete two years of algebra and one year of 
geometry in high school; (b) the student has not completed a mathematics course in the past five 
years. 

Functional approach to algebra that incorporates the use of appropriate technology. Emphasis will 
be placed on the study of functions and their graphs, inequalities, and linear, quadratic, rational, 
polynomial, exponential, and logarithmic functions. Appropriate applications will be included. 

MATH 1113 PRE-CALCULUS MATHEMATICS 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: MATH 1111 

Designed to prepare students for calculus, physics, and related technical subjects. Topics include 
an intensive study of algebraic, trigonometric, logarithmic and exponential functions accompa- 
nied by analytic geometry. 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 213 



MATH 1161 CALCULUS I 4-0-4 

Prerequisite: MATH 1113 

Functions and limits; the derivative and its applications, antidifferentiation; the definite integral 

and applications; exponential and logarithmic functions. 

MATH 1950 APPLIED MATH FOR NON-SCIENCE MAJORS 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: MATH 1111 

Mathematical applications in economics and the social sciences. Linear functions and models; 
matrix operations and applications; inequalities and linear programming; exponential functions 
and log functions; single and multi-variate differentiation. 

MATH 2072 CALCULUS II 4-0-4 

Prerequisite: MATH 1161 

Techniques and applications of integration; transcendental functions; indeterminate forms; 

improper integrals; parametric equations and polar coordinates; sequences and series; Taylor's 

theorem. 

MATH 2083 CALCULUS III 4-0-4 

Prerequisite: MATH 2072 

Vectors, curves, and surfaces; partial differentiation; multiple integrals; curve integrals and 
surface integrals; the theorems of Green and Stokes; the Divergence Theorem; introduction to 
differential equations. 

MATH 2160 LINEAR ALGEBRA 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: MATH 2072 

Linear systems and matrices; vector spaces, linear independence, rank of a matrix; linear 

transformations; determinants; introduction to eigenvalues and eigenvectors; diagonalization; 

applications. 

MATH 2200 ELEMENTARY STATISTICS 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: MATH 1111 

Measures of central tendency and dispersion; probability distributions; inferences concerning 

means and proportions; goodness of fit; correlation; linear regression. 

MATH 2252 COMPUTATIONAL METHODS IN STATISTICS 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: MATH 2200 and either CSCI 1050 or CSCI 1301 

Statistical programming with Minitab and SAS software, including data analyses involving 

ANOVA, multiple regression, nonparametric statistics. Crosslisted as CSCI 2252. 

MATH 2900 SPIRIT AND STRUCTURE OF MATHEMATICS 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: MATH 1111 

Designed to portray the history, philosophy, and aesthetics of mathematics, and to develop an 
appreciation of the role of mathematics. Topics include logic, set theory, problem solving, number 
systems, statistics, probability, geometry. 

MATH 3000 INTRODUCTION TO MATHEMATICAL PROOF 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: MATH 2072 

Elementary logic, set theory, functions and relations, methods of proof including induction, and 

selected topics from major areas of mathematics. 

MATH 3110 ABSTRACT ALGEBRA 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: MATH 2083 and MATH 3000 

Elementary properties of integers, groups, rings, and fields; mappings, homomorphisms, kernels, 

quotient structures. 



214 ARMSTRONG ATLANTIC STATE UNIVERSITY 



MATH 3170 ADVANCED LINEAR ALGEBRA 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: MATH 2160 and MATH 3000 

Abstract vector spaces, linear transformations, eigenvectors and eigenvalues, diagonalization, 

inner product spaces, real quadratic forms. 

MATH 3211 PROBABILITY AND MATHEMATICAL STATISTICS I 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: MATH 2072 

Data collection, organization and description; probability, random variables; discrete and con- 
tinuous probability distributions; Central Limit Theorem; point and interval estimation; tests of 
hypotheses, simple linear regression and correlation. 

MATH 3222 PROBABILITY AND MATHEMATICAL STATISTICS II 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: MATH 3211 

Analysis of variance; nonlinear and multiple regression; chi-square tests for categorical data; 

nonparametric methods; Bayesian inference; use of statistical packages to analyze data sets. 

MATH 3251 PROBABILITY AND COMBINATORICS 3-0-3 

Corequisite: MATH 3211 

Permutations and combinations; binomial coefficients; distributions of random variables; inde- 
pendence and conditional probability; distributions of functions of random variables such as 
expectation, variance and moment-generating functions; Central Limit Theorem; estimation; 
tests of statistical hypotheses; conditional and marginal distributions; multivariate distributions. 

MATH 3360 MODERN GEOMETRY 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: MATH 3000 

An axiomatic approach to the fundamental ideas of Euclidean geometry, including congruence, 
similarities, circles, elementary transformations and constructions. Examination of non-Euclid- 
ean geometries. 

MATH 3411 DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: MATH 2072 

First order linear and nonlinear equations; second and higher order linear equations; applications; 

the Laplace transform; numerical solution with emphasis on computer-aided solution. 

MATH 3422 DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS II 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: MATH 3411 

Series solutions; linear and nonlinear first order systems; applications; numerical methods; 

boundary value problems; introduction to Fourier series and partial differential equations. 

MATH 3460 INTRODUCTION TO OPERATIONS RESEARCH 3-0-3 

Corequisites: MATH 2160 and MATH 321 1 

Topics in operations research selected from linear programming, project management, decision 

analysis, queueing theory, simulation, dynamic programming, scheduling theory. 

MATH 3480 OPTIMIZATION AND GRAPH THEORY 3-0-3 

Corequisite: MATH 2160 and MATH 321 1 

Topics in operations research selected from nonlinear programming, network analysis, Markhov 

chains, game theory, inventory theory. 

MATH 3900 SPECIAL TOPICS IN APPLIED MATHEMATICS V-V-(l-3) 

Prerequisite: announced with the course 

Special topics of current interest in upper-level applied mathematics. 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 215 



MATH 3911 MATH FOR ELEMENTARY SCHOOL TEACHERS 2-3-3 

Prerequisite: MATH 2900 

Mathematics in the K-6 curriculum, with emphasis on appropriate methods of teaching for 
understanding through activity-based and problem-solving experiences. Emphasis on communi- 
cation and connections; frequent use of a wide range of manipulatives to embody concepts in 
arithmetic and whole numbers, fractions and decimals; geometry and measurement. Directed field 
experience and required laboratory. 

MATH 3932 TEACHING OF MIDDLE SCHOOL/GENERAL MATHEMATICS 2-3-3 

Prerequisite: MATH 391 1 

The teaching of traditional topics such as fractions, decimals, percentage, measurement (espe- 
cially the metric system), informal geometry, algebraic structures, probability and statistics. 
Emphasis on cooperative learning in an activity-based, problem-solving environment; incorpo- 
ration of drill and practice in necessary skills with appropriate games and laboratory exercises. 
Directed field experience and required laboratory. 

MATH 4000 PUTNAM SEMINAR 0-2-1 

Prerequisite: MATH 2083 

A variety of mathematical problems, considered with the aim of developing problem-solving 

techniques. 

MATH 4011 ADVANCED CALCULUS I 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: MATH 2083 

The real number system; sequences and series; limits of functions, the Bolzano- Weierstrass 

theorem; uniform continuity; the derivative. 

MATH 4022 ADVANCED CALCULUS n 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: MATH 401 1 

The Riemann integral; metric spaces; compactness; sequences of functions; uniform conver- 
gence. 

MATH 4060 FUNCTIONS OF COMPLEX VARIABLES 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: MATH 2083 

Complex numbers; elementary functions and transformations; differentiation; analytic functions; 

integration theory; series; residue theory; conformal mapping and applications. 

MATH 4200 ACTUARIAL SCIENCE SEMINAR (l-3)-0-(l-3) 

Prerequisite: MATH 3222 

Study of topics related to a career in actuarial science. 

MATH 4360 TOPOLOGY 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: MATH 2083 and MATH 3000 

Topological spaces and homeomorphisms, separability, compactness, connectedness; complete- 
ness; metrizability; introduction to homotopy theory. 

MATH 4400 OPERATIONS RESEARCH SEMINAR (1-3)0(1-3) 

Study of topics related to a career in operations research. 

MATH 4610 NUMERICAL ANALYSIS 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: MATH 2072 and CSCI 1301 

An introductory course in numerical analysis and computation. Topics include computer arith- 
metic and numerical error, systems of linear equations, iterative methods for nonlinear equations, 
polynomial interpolation, least squares approximation, and numerical integration. 



216 ARMSTRONG ATLANTIC STATE UNIVERSITY 



MATH 4900 SPECIAL TOPICS V-V-U-3) 

Prerequisite: announced with the topic 

Special topics of current interest in upper-level mathematics. 

MATH 4961, -2, -3 INTERNSHIP IN MATHEMATICS 0-6-3 

Prerequisite: permission of instructor or department 

Experience in a variety of mathematical applications suited to the educational and professional 
aspirations of the student, under the direction of faculty and appropriate off-campus supervisory 
personnel. Open to transient students only with the permission of the department head. 

MATH 5160U THEORY OF NUMBERS 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: MATH 3000 

A survey of topics from number theory to include divisibility and congruence, diophantine 
equations, distribution of prime numbers, famous unsolved problems, number-theoretic functions 
and their applications, theorems of Fermat and Euler. 

MATH 5600U FOUNDATIONS OF MATHEMATICS 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: MATH 2072 

Fundamental ideas of axiomatic mathematics, including sets, relations, functions, algebraic 

structures, with emphasis on techniques of writing proofs. 

MATH 5700U HISTORY OF MATHEMATICS 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: MATH 3000 

The historical development of mathematics from its empirical beginnings to its present state. 

MATH 5900U TOPICS IN MATHEMATICS V-V-(l-3) 

Prerequisite: permission of instructor or department 
Special topics of current interest in upper-level mathematics. 

MEDT - Medical Technology 

MEDT 3000 INTRODUCTION TO MEDICAL LABORATORY SCIENCE 1-0-1 

Corequisite: MEDT 3001 

Open only to medical technology majors. Role of the medical technologist as member of health 
care team. Basic knowledge of clinical laboratory science including content common to several 
discipline areas, literature research, and basic laboratory mathematics. 

MEDT 3001 INTRODUCTION TO MEDICAL LABORATORY METHODS 1-3-2 

Corequisite: MEDT 3000 

Laboratory course covering basic skills common to all areas of the medical laboratory. Topics 
include principles of quality assurance, microscopy, basic principles of instruments, staining 
techniques, serologic testing and pipetting. 

MEDT 3011 FOUNDATIONS OF MEDICAL LABORATORY SCIENCE 1-2-2 

Prerequisite: MLT certification and admission to the program 

Role of the medical technologist as a member of health care team. Basic knowledge of clinical 
laboratory science. Topics include content common to several discipline areas, literature research, 
basic laboratory mathematics, basic laboratory skills. 

MEDT 3100 URINALYSIS AND BODY FLUIDS 2-3-3 

Open only to medical technology majors. Qualitative and quantitative study of the clinical and 
microscopic constituents of body fluids and the clinical significance of test results. 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 217 



MEDT 3110 URINALYSIS AND BODY FLUIDS 2-0-2 

Prerequisite: admission to MT Program 

Qualitative and quantitative study of the chemical and microscopic constituents of urine and other 

body fluids. Clinical significance of test results. 

MEDT 3200 CLINICAL MICROBIOLOGY 4-4-5 

Open only to medical technology majors. The relationship of bacteria, mycobacteria, spirochaetes, 
and mycoplasmas to human disease with an emphasis on the isolation and identification of 
pathogenic bacteria. 

MEDT 3210 CLINICAL MICROBIOLOGY 4-0-4 

Prerequisite: admission to MT Program 

The relationship of bacteria, mycobacteria, spirochaetes, and mycoplasmas to human disease. 

Emphasis on the isolation and identification of bacteria responsible for human disease. 

MEDT 3300 CLINICAL HEMATOLOGY AND HEMOSTASIS 3-4-4 

Open only to medical technology majors. Qualitative and quantitative study of the formed 
elements of blood including the complete blood count, specialized test procedures, and the basic 
principles of hemostasis and blood coagulation. 

MEDT 3310 CLINICAL HEMATOLOGY AND HEMOSTASIS 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: admission to MT Program 

Qualitative and quantitative study of the formed elements of blood including the complete blood 

count, specialized test procedures, and the basic principles of hemostasis and blood coagulation. 

MEDT 3400 CLINICAL IMMUNOHEMATOLOGY 2-3-3 

Open only to medical technology majors. Basic immunohematologic principles and their 
application to the preparation and administration of whole blood and blood components including 
the selection and processing of donors, cross matching procedures, and antibody identification. 

MEDT 3410 CLINICAL IMMUNOHEMATOLOGY 2-0-2 

Prerequisite: admission to MT Program 

Basic immunohematologic principles and their application to the preparation and administration 
of whole blood and blood components. Includes the selection and processing of donors, cross 
matching procedures, and antibody identification. 

MEDT 3501 CLINICAL CHEMISTRY I 3-4-4 

Open only to medical technology majors. Physiological principles, methodologies and clinical 
significance of biochemicals and elements found in body fluids. 

MEDT 3502 CLINICAL CHEMISTRY II 2-0-2 

Prerequisite: MEDT 3501 

Advanced level topics in clinical chemistry. 

MEDT 3510 CLINICAL CHEMISTRY HI 3-0-4 

Prerequisite: admission to MT Program 

Physiological principles, methodologies and clinical significance of biochemicals and elements 

found in body fluids. 

MEDT 3600 CLINICAL INSTRUMENTATION 2-3-3 

Prerequisite: permission of instructor or department 

Open only to medical technology majors. Principles and operation of medical laboratory 

instrumentation. 



218 ARMSTRONG ATLANTIC STATE UNIVERSITY 



MEDT 3610 CLINICAL INSTRUMENTATION 2-0-2 

Prerequisite: admission to MT Program 

Principles and operation of medical laboratory instrumentation. 

MEDT 3700 CLINICAL IMMUNOSEROLOGY 2-2-3 

Open only to medical technology majors. Principles and procedures used in the isolation, 
identification, and quantifications of diagnostically significant antigens and antibodies. 

MEDT 3710 CLINICAL IMMUNOSEROLOGY 2-0-2 

Prerequisite: admission to MT Program 

Principles and procedures used in the isolation, identification, and quantifications of diagnosti- 
cally significant antigens and antibodies. 

MEDT 3800 CLINICAL PARASITOLOGY 0-3-1 

Open only to medical technology majors. Pathogenesis, life cycles, and laboratory identification 
of human parasites. 

MEDT 3900 CLINICAL MYCOLOGY AND VIROLOGY 2-2-3 

Open only to medical technology majors. Pathogenesis, isolation, and identification of clinically 
significant fungi and viruses. 

MEDT 4000 DIRECTED STUDY 3-3-1 

Prerequisite: permission of instructor or department 

Selected medical technology topics. Credit varies by topic. Offered on demand. 

MEDT 4110 PHLEBOTOMY PRACTICUM 0-V-1 

Prerequisite: permission of instructor or department 

Open only to medical technology majors. Structured clinical laboratory experience in phle- 
botomy. 

MEDT 4210 CLINICAL MICROBIOLOGY PRACTICUM O-V-2 

Prerequisite: MEDT 3200 and MEDT 3800 and MEDT 3900 

Structured clinical laboratory experiences in microbiology, parasitology, and mycology. 

MEDT 4310 CLINICAL HEMATOLOGY PRACTICUM O-V-2 

Prerequisite: MEDT 3300 

Structured clinical laboratory experience in hematology and hemostasis. 

MEDT 4410 CLINICAL IMMUNOHEMATOLOGY PRACTICUM O-V-2 

Prerequisite: MEDT 3400 

Structured clinical laboratory experience in transfusion medicine. 

MEDT 4510 CLINICAL CHEMISTRY PRACTICUM O-V-2 

Prerequisite: MEDT 3501 and MEDT 3502 

Structured clinical laboratory experience in automated and special chemistry. 

MEDT 4600 SENIOR SEMINAR 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: all of HLPR 2000, MEDT 41 10, 4210, 4310, 4410, 4510, 4610, 4710, 4810 
Advanced topics in clinical laboratory science, emphasizing analysis and presentation of multi- 
disciplinary case studies. 

MEDT 4610 CLINICAL URINALYSIS PRACTICUM 0-V-1 

Prerequisite: MEDT 3100 

Structured clinical laboratory experience in urinalysis. 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 219 



MEDT 4710 CLINICAL IMMUNOSEROLOGY PRACTICUM 0-V-1 

Prerequisite: MEDT 3700 

Structured clinical laboratory experience in serology. 

MEDT 4810 SPECIAL TOPICS PRACTICUM 0-V-l 

Prerequisite: all of MEDT 3100, 3200, 3300, 3400, 3501, 3502, 3600, 3700, 3800, 3900 
Structured experiences in alternate clinical sites. Settings may include doctors, reference, and 
clinic laboratories. 

MEDT 4900 LABORATORY MANAGEMENT AND EDUCATION 3-0-3 

Prerequisite or corequisite: all of MEDT 41 10, 4210, 4310, 4410, 4510, 4610, 4710, 4810 
Fundamental concepts of laboratory management, operation, finance, managerial leadership, 
personnel administration, and educational principles for laboratory scientists. 

METR - Meteorology 

METR 3100 INTRODUCTION TO METEOROLOGY 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: 6 semester hours of science 

Introduction to the description of the state of the atmosphere and the physical laws that describe 

atmospheric phenomena. 

MGSE - Middle Grades/Secondary Education 

MGSE 2150 ADOLESCENT GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT 3-3-3 

Prerequisite: orientation to teaching module and CEUG 1010 

Developmental processes from onset of puberty to adulthood including directed observation. 

MGSE 3060 CURRICULUM AND METHODS (4-8) 3-4-3 

Prerequisite: orientation to teaching module 

Prerequisite or corequisite: MGSE 2150 

Development of curricula and selection of instructional strategies and materials appropriate for 

4-8 level. Directed field experiences. 

MGSE 3071 LANGUAGE ARTS THEORY AND PRACTICE 3-2-3 

Prerequisite: admission to teacher education 

Methods, content, and materials focusing on literature and the communicative arts for adoles- 
cence. Directed field experiences. 

MGSE 3080 STUDENT AND PROGRAM EVALUATION 3-2-3 

Prerequisite: admission to teacher education 

Standardized tests, evaluation methods, and best practices utilizing existing content and peda- 
gogical software, internet resources, and technical writing. Directed field experiences and field 
based research. 

MGSE 3100 MIDDLE SCHOOL THEORY AND PRACTICE 3-6-3 

Prerequisite: admission to teacher education 

History and purpose of middle school; characteristics of middle school learner, role of middle 

school teacher, and appropriate programs and methods including directed field experiences. 

MGSE 3351 SECONDARY SCHOOL CURRICULUM 

AND METHODS, GENERAL 3-6-3 

Prerequisite: admission to teacher education and CEUG 1010 

Systematic observation, analysis of critical incidents, and examination of instructional models. 

Directed field experience includes two hours per day, M-F. 



220 ARMSTRONG ATLANTIC STATE UNIVERSITY 



MGSE 4090 CLASSROOM MANAGEMENT 3-8-3 

Prerequisite: admission to teacher education 

Research knowledge base to create a well managed classroom and guide the behavior of middle 

grade children including field based placement. 

MGSE 4100 STUDENT TEACHING AND SEMINAR I 2-0-6 

Prerequisite: admission to teacher education 

Corequisite: MGSE 41 10 

Opportunities to use knowledge and skills in a supervised 4-5 public school setting. 

MGSE 4110 STUDENT TEACHING AND SEMINAR II 2-0-6 

Prerequisite: admission to teacher education 

Corequisite: MGSE 4100 

Opportunities to use knowledge and skills in a supervised 6-8 public school setting. 

MGSE 4180 YOUNG ADULT LITERATURE 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: admission to teacher education and MGSE 3071 

Significant literature and multimedia literary offerings appropriate for young adults. 

MGSE 4280 TEACHING LITERACY THROUGH READING IN 

THE CONTENT AREAS 3-4-3 

Prerequisite: admission to teacher education 

Teaching literacy through reading in the content areas for adolescents. Directed field experiences. 

MGSE 4340 PHYSICAL SCIENCE THEORY AND PRACTICE (4-8) 3-2-3 

Prerequisite: admission to teacher education 

Interpretation of physical science for middle grades with emphasis upon discovery process and 
other science teaching strategies. Field trips required. 

MGSE 4342 SOCIAL STUDIES THEORY AND PRACTICE (4-8) 3-2-3 

Prerequisite: admission to teacher education 

Selected themes, problems, concepts, and organization of instruction for social studies skills and 

processes needed by middle grades learners. 

MGSE 4350 LIFE SCIENCE THEORY AND PRACTICE (4-8) 3-2-3 

Prerequisite: admission to teacher education 

Interpretation of life science for middle grades with emphasis upon discovery process and other 
science teaching strategies. Field trips required. 

MGSE 4392 SECONDARY SCHOOL CURRICULUM AND 

METHODS, ENGLISH 3-4-3 

Prerequisite: admission to teacher education and CEUG 1010 and MGSE 3351 

Middle and secondary school English curriculum with emphasis upon materials and methods 

including field experience. 

MGSE 4412 SECONDARY SCHOOL CURRICULUM AND 

METHODS, MATHEMATICS 3-4-3 

Prerequisite: admission to teacher education and CEUG 1010 and MGSE 3351 

Materials and methods of teaching middle and secondary school mathematics including field 

experiences. 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 221 



MGSE 4442 CURRICULUM AND METHODS OF FOREIGN 

LANGUAGE EDUCATION 3-3-3 

Prerequisite: admission to teacher education and MGSE 3351 

Middle and secondary school theory, methods, and materials appropriate for second language 

acquisition. 

MGSE 4472 SECONDARY SCHOOL CURRICULUM AND 

METHODS, SCIENCE 3-4-3 

Prerequisite: admission to teacher education and MGSE 3351 and CEUG 1010 

Middle and secondary school science curriculum with emphasis upon materials and methods 

including field experiences. 

MGSE 4492 SECONDARY SCHOOL CURRICULUM AND 

METHODS, SOCIAL SCIENCE 3-4-3 

Prerequisite: admission to teacher education and CEUG 1010 and MGSE 3351 

Materials and methods of teaching middle and secondary school social studies including field 

experiences. 

MGSE 4630 CLASSROOM MANAGEMENT 3-8-3 

Prerequisite: admission to teacher education 

Provides research knowledge base to create a well managed classroom and guide the behavior of 

middle and secondary students. Field based placement. 

MGSE 4750 STUDENT TEACHING AND SEMINAR 2-V-(9-12) 

Prerequisite: admission to teacher education 

Opportunities to use the knowledge and skills in a supervised 7-12 public school setting. 

MGSE 4811 INTERNSHIP I O-V-6 

Prerequisite: permission of instructor or department 

Supervision for one semester by college staff for students who hold teaching positions in school 

and/or clinical settings. 

MGSE 4812 INTERNSHIP II O-V-6 

Prerequisite: permission of instructor or department and MGSE 481 1 

Supervision for one semester by college staff for students who hold teaching positions in school 

and/or clinical settings. 

MUSC - Music 

MUSC 1000 RECITAL ATTENDANCE 0-2-0 

Attendance at a designated number of concerts and recitals each semester. 

MUSC 1 100 MUSIC APPRECIATION 3-0-3 

Introduction to music history and literature. 

MUSC 1110 BASIC MUSIC THEORY 3-0-3 

Elements of music theory. Functions as preparation for MUSC1 111 for music majors who have 
not passed the music theory entrance exam. May not be used for credit towards a music degree. 

MUSC 1111 ELEMENTARY MUSIC THEORY I 2-2-2 

Prerequisite: MUSC 1 1 10 or passing music theory entrance exam 

Corequisite: MUSC 1130 

Basic theoretical principles of music, including analysis, sightsinging, and ear training. 



222 ARMSTRONG ATLANTIC STATE UNIVERSITY 



MUSC 1112 ELEMENTARY MUSIC THEORY II 2-2-2 

Prerequisite: MUSC 1111 

Corequisite: MUSC 1130 

A continuation of MUSC 1111 with emphasis on part writing of diatonic material up through 

seventh cords. 

MUSC 1130 INTRODUCTION TO KEYBOARD HARMONY 0-2-1 

Prerequisite: permission of instructor or department 

Corequisite: MUSC 1111 or MUSC 1112 

Keyboard techniques which reinforce theoretical concepts covered in MUSC1111, including 

those skills needed to fulfill the piano proficiency exam. 

MUSC 1270 WORLD ART AND MUSIC 3-0-3 

Comparison of traditional art and music from a variety of world cultures. Emphasis on art and 
music's role, media and techniques, and the inherent personal expression of various artists and 
composers. Crosslisted as ARTS 1270. 

MUSC 1300 APPLIED MUSIC 0-1-1 

Prerequisite: permission of instructor or department 

Offered primarily for music majors, with a limited number of non-majors accepted when 
schedules permit. Students must pass a qualifying audition. Consists of one 25-minute private 
lesson per week; additionally all students enrolled in applied music are required to participate in 
weekly performance classes. Applicable to music degree only for secondary applied credit. May 
be repeated for credit. 

MUSC 1400 APPLIED MUSIC 0-2-2 

Prerequisite: permission of instructor or department 

Corequisite: MUSC 2540 or MUSC 2560 

Offered for music majors. Students must pass a qualifying audition. Consists of one 50-minute 

lesson or two 25-minute lessons per week; additionally all students enrolled in applied music are 

required to participate in weekly performance classes in their major area and to attend recitals and 

concerts. May be repeated for credit. 

MUSC 2010 UNDERSTANDING JAZZ 2-0-2 

Non-technical survey of important jazz performers and styles. 

MUSC 2111 INTERMEDIATE THEORY I 2-2-2 

Prerequisite: MUSC 1112 

Corequisite: MUSC 2130 

Continuation of MUSC 1112 with an emphasis on chromatic harmony and the introduction of 

binary and ternary formal structures. 

MUSC 2112 INTERMEDIATE THEORY II 2-2-2 

Prerequisite: MUSC 2111 

Corequisite: MUSC 2130 

Continuation of MUSC 2111 with an emphasis on harmonic practices of the late nineteenth and 

twentieth centuries, including triads of higher tertian relationships, synthetic scaler materials, 

atonality, and twelve-tone technique. 

MUSC 2130 ADVANCED KEYBOARD HARMONY 0-2-1 

Prerequisite: MUSC 1130 

Corequisite: MUSC 21 1 1 or MUSC 21 12 

Keyboard techniques which reinforce theoretical concepts covered in MUSC 2111, including 

those skills needed to fulfill the piano proficiency exam. Must be completed with a grade of C or 

higher in order to continue in the theory /keyboard harmony sequence. 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 223 



MUSC 2171 LYRIC DICTION I 2-0-2 

Prerequisite: permission of instructor or department 

International phonetic alphabet and the phonetics of standard American English and Italian for 

singing. 

MUSC 2172 LYRIC DICTION II 2-0-2 

Prerequisite: MUSC 2171 

Orientation of the phonetics of liturgical Latin, German and French for singing by means of the 

international phonetic alphabet. 

MUSC 2201 JAZZ IMPROVISATION I 0-2-1 

Prerequisite: MUSC 1112 

Improvisation through study of scales, chords, melodic concepts, ear training and analysis. 

MUSC 2202 JAZZ IMPROVISATION II 0-2-1 

Prerequisite: MUSC 2201 
Continuation of MUSC 2201. 

MUSC 2240 CLASS GUITAR 0-2-1 

Prerequisite: permission of instructor or department 

Basic skills for guitar accompaniment of folk songs and popular music. 

MUSC 2270 CLASS VOICE 0-2-1 

Prerequisite: ability to read music 

Vocal technique with practical application to standard song literature. Applicable to a music 

degree only for secondary applied credit. May be repeated for credit. Ability to read music 

required. 

MUSC 2280 CLASS PIANO NON-MUSIC MAJORS 0-2-1 

Prerequisite: permission of instructor or department 

Keyboard literature and techniques at the beginning and elementary levels. May be repeated for 

credit. 

MUSC 2360 BRASS METHODS 0-2-1 

Open only to music majors. Principles of brass instrument performance and pedagogy. 

MUSC 2370 WOODWIND METHODS 0-2-1 

Open only to music majors. Principles of woodwind performance and pedagogy. 

MUSC 2380 PERCUSSION METHODS 0-2-1 

Open only to music majors. Principles of percussion instrument performance and pedagogy. 

MUSC 2390 STRING AND GUITAR METHODS 0-2-1 

Open only to music majors. Principles of string and guitar performance and pedagogy. 

MUSC 2400 APPLIED MUSIC 0-2-2 

Prerequisite: permission of instructor or department and MUSC 1400 

Corequisite: MUSC 2540 or MUSC 2560 

Open only to music majors. Students must pass a qualifying audition. Consists of one 50-minute 

lesson or two 25-minute lessons per week; additionally, all students enrolled in applied music are 

required to participate in weekly performance classes in their major area and to attend recitals and 

concerts. May be repeated for credit. 



224 ARMSTRONG ATLANTIC STATE UNIVERSITY 



MUSC 2500 PEP BAND 0-2-1 

Group to provide spirit music at school athletic functions. May be taken for a credit a maximum 
of four times. Open to qualified students. 

MUSC 2510 CONCERT BAND 0-2-1 

Group which rehearses and performs standard literature for symphonic band. Open to qualified 
students. 

MUSC 2520 JAZZ ENSEMBLE 0-2-1 

Prerequisite: permission of instructor or department 

Repertoire selected from a variety of jazz periods and styles. Public performances required. 

MUSC 2530 ARMSTRONG SINGERS 0-2-1 

Corequisite: MUSC 2540 

Repertoire selected from vocal chamber literature including classic literature and jazz. Public 

performances each term. Membership open to all students by audition. 

MUSC 2540 CONCERT CHOIR 0-3-1 

Repertoire selected from standard choral concert literature. Public performances each semester. 
Membership open to all students. Ability to read music desired, but not required. 

MUSC 2550 CHAMBER ENSEMBLE 0-2-1 

Open to all qualified students in the performance media of brass, woodwind, strings, keyboard, 
and percussion. 

MUSC 2560 WIND ENSEMBLE 0-3-1 

Prerequisite: permission of instructor or department 

Repertoire selection from standard wind ensemble literature. Public performances required. 

MUSC 2580 KEYBOARD ACCOMPANYING 1-1-2 

Open only to music majors. Basic principles of accompaniment for vocal and instrumental solo 
and chamber music. 

MUSC 2590 ORATORIO CHORUS 0-2-1 

Repertoire from standard choral literature and larger works. Public performances each semester. 
Evening rehearsals. 

MUSC 2810 CONDUCTING 2-0-2 

Prerequisite: MUSC 1112 

Open only to music majors. Conducting techniques and interpretation. 

MUSC 3120 FORM AND ANALYSIS 2-0-2 

Prerequisite: MUSC 2112 

Open only to music majors. Principles of form in music, including imitative techniques and forms, 

and techniques of harmonic analysis. 

MUSC 3200 MUSIC FOR THE ELEMENTARY TEACHER 3-0-3 

Materials and methods for teaching general music in the elementary classroom. Not open to music 
majors. 

MUSC 3300 MUSIC TEACHING IN LOWER SCHOOLS I 2-0-2 

Open only to music majors. Analysis and evaluation of pedagogical approaches and materials for 
teaching general and vocal music in the lower school (K-12). Includes teaching practice. 






COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 225 



MUSC 3310 MUSIC TEACHING IN MIDDLE AND HIGH SCHOOL 2-0-2 

Open only to music majors. Analysis and evaluation of pedagogical approaches and materials for 
teaching general music in the middle and high schools. Includes history of music education, design 
of curriculum and lesson planning, and teaching practice. 

MUSC 3320 MUSIC TEACHING IN LOWER SCHOOLS II 2-0-2 

Prerequisite: MUSC 3300 

Continuation of MUSC 33 10 with emphasis on the Orff, Kodaly, and DBME strategies in teaching 

elementary music. Includes teaching practice. 

MUSC 3330 BAND METHODS 2-1-2 

Organization and development of school band ensembles and problems of teaching instrumental 
music. Includes a laboratory experience which simulates ensemble rehearsals. 

MUSC 3340 CHORAL AND GENERAL MUSIC METHODS IN SECONDARY 
SCHOOLS 2-1-2 

Prerequisite: MUSC 2810 and one of MUSC 2360, 2370 or 2380 

Development of skills in teaching general music and organizing, teaching, and conducting choral 
music in secondary schools. Includes a laboratory experience which provides opportunities for 
students to teach general music lessons and conduct ensemble rehearsals. 

MUSC 3400 APPLIED MUSIC 0-2-2 

Prerequisite: permission of instructor or department and passage of rising junior exam 
Open only to music majors. Consists of one 50-minute lesson or two 25-minute lessons per week; 
additionally, all students enrolled in applied music are required to participate in weekly perfor- 
mance classes in their major area and to attend recitals and concerts. May be repeated for credit. 

MUSC 3510 CONCERT BAND 0-2-1 

Prerequisite: four semesters of MUSC 2510 

Rehearsals and performances of standard literature for symphonic band. 

MUSC 3520 JAZZ ENSEMBLE 0-2-1 

Prerequisite: four semesters of MUSC 2520 

Repertoire selected from vocal chamber literature including classic literature and vocal jazz. 

Public performances each term. Membership open to all students by audition. 

MUSC 3530 ARMSTRONG SINGERS 0-2-1 

Prerequisite: four semesters of MUSC 2530 

Repertoire selected from vocal chamber literature including classic literature and vocal jazz. 

Public performances each term. Membership open to all students by audition. 

MUSC 3540 CONCERT CHOIR 0-3-1 

Prerequisite: four semesters of MUSC 2540 

Repertoire selected from standard choral concert literature. Public performances each term. 

MUSC 3550 CHAMBER ENSEMBLE 0-2-1 

Prerequisite: four semesters of MUSC 2550 

Open to all qualified students in the performance media of brass, woodwind, strings, keyboard, 

and percussion. 

MUSC 3560 WIND ENSEMBLE 0-3-1 

Prerequisite: four semesters of MUSC 2560 

Repertoire selection from the standard wind ensemble literature. Public performances required. 



226 ARMSTRONG ATLANTIC STATE UNIVERSITY 



MUSC 3610 ORCHESTRATION AND ARRANGING 2-0-2 

Prerequisite: MUSC 2112 

Open only to music majors. Techniques of orchestration; arranging for instrumental and choral 

groups. 

MUSC 3710 MUSIC HISTORY I 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: MUSC 1 1 12 and MUSC 1 100 

History of music in western civilization from origin to end of baroque era. 

MUSC 3720 MUSIC HISTORY II 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: MUSC 1 1 12 and MUSC 1 100 

History of music in western civilization from classical era to present; influence of world music. 

MUSC 4110 COMPOSITION V-V-V 

Prerequisite: MUSC 21 12 

Open only to music majors. Musical composition. May be repeated for credit. 

MUSC 4120 COUNTERPOINT 2-0-2 

Prerequisite: MUSC 2112 

Open only to music majors. Contrapuntal practices of eighteenth century music. 

MUSC 4160 TOPICS IN INSTRUMENTAL REPERTOIRE AND PEDAGOGICAL 
TECHNIQUES 2-0-2 

Prerequisite: permission of instructor or department 

Open to juniors or above. Instrumental literature and teaching techniques from brass, guitar, 

percussion or woodwind instruments. May be repeated for credit as topics vary. 

MUSC 4200 PIANO LITERATURE I 2-0-2 

Historical, stylistic, formal and aesthetic features of piano literature of the baroque and classical 
periods. 

MUSC 4210 PIANO LITERATURE II 2-0-2 

Historical, stylistic, formal, and aesthetic features of piano literature of the romantic and 
contemporary periods. 

MUSC 4230 CHORAL REPERTOIRE 2-1-2 

Prerequisite: MUSC 2810 

Literature and related performance practice for school choral ensembles. Includes a laboratory 
experience which provides opportunities for students to teach the literature and apply perfor- 
mance-practice concepts in ensemble rehearsals. 

MUSC 4240 BAND REPERTOIRE 2-1-2 

Prerequisite: MUSC 2810 

Literature and performance practice for school instrumental ensembles. Includes a laboratory 

situation to simulate an ensemble setting. 

MUSC 4250 PIANO PEDAGOGY 2-0-2 

Open only to music majors. Historical overview of pedagogical techniques of the piano and a 
survey of literature suited for teaching purposes. 

MUSC 4270 VOCAL PEDAGOGY 2-0-2 

Prerequisite: permission of instructor or department 

Pedagogical techniques of the voice and a survey of literature suited for teaching purposes. 

Successful completion of the Rising Junior Voice Exam required. 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 227 



MUSC 4280 MARCHING BAND TECHNIQUES 2-0-2 

Prerequisite: MUSC 2810 

Organization and development of a school marching band, including drill writing, scoring, and 

rehearsal techniques. 

MUSC 4290 ART SONG 2-0-2 

Prerequisite: MUSC 1100 

Historical, stylistic, formal, and aesthetic characteristics of the art song from its origins to the 

present day. 

MUSC 4320 SYMPHONIC MUSIC LITERATURE 2-0-2 

Prerequisite: MUSC 1100 

Historical, stylistic, formal, and aesthetic features of symphonic music. 

MUSC 4400 APPLIED MUSIC 0-2-2 

Prerequisite: permission of instructor or department and MUSC 3400 

Open only to music majors. Consists of one 50-minute lesson or two 25-minute lessons per week; 
additionally, all students enrolled in applied music are required to participate in weekly perfor- 
mance classes in their major area and to attend recitals and concerts. May be repeated for credit. 

MUSC 4800 ADVANCED CHORAL CONDUCTING 2-1-2 

Prerequisite: MUSC 2810 and MUSC 3120 and MUSC 3610 and successful completion of piano 
proficiency exam 

Advanced techniques in choral conducting. Includes a laboratory experience which provides 
opportunities for students to conduct ensemble rehearsals. 

MUSC 4810 ADVANCED INSTRUMENTAL CONDUCTING 2-1-2 

Prerequisite: MUSC 2810 and MUSC 3120 and MUSC 3610 and successful completion of piano 

proficiency exam 

Open only to music majors. Advanced techniques for the instrumental conductor. 

MUSC 4890 SELECTED STUDIES IN MUSIC V-V-(l-5) 

Prerequisite: permission of instructor or department 

Varied course offerings designed to meet special institutional and community needs. May be 

repeated for credit. 

MUSC 4900 DIRECTED INDIVIDUAL STUDY V-V-(l-5) 

Prerequisite: permission of instructor or department 

Open only to music majors. Supervised individual research or study. 

MUSC 4910 INTERNSHIP V-V-(l-5) 

Prerequisite: permission of instructor or department 

Open only to music majors. Supervised individually designed course project involving off- 
campus study, work, and/or research. Projects are under the joint supervision of the sponsoring 
institution and the faculty supervisor. 

NURS - Nursing 

NURS 1200 MULTIDISCIPLINARY SKILLS IN HEALTH PROFESSIONS 1-3-2 

Prerequisite: eligibility for ENGL 1 101 and eligibility for MATH 1111 

Emphasis on basic patient care skills common to all health professions. Patient and health 

practitioner safety is emphasized in class laboratory exercises. Crosslisted as HLPR 1200. 



228 ARMSTRONG ATLANTIC STATE UNIVERSITY 



NURS 2241 NURSING AND HEALTH PROMOTION I 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: permission of instructor or department 

Theoretical concepts that provide the foundation for professional nursing along with an introduc- 
tion to health promotion. 

NURS 2260 HEALTH POLICY IN NURSING PRACTICE 1-0-1 

Prerequisite or corequisite: NURS 2241 and HLPR 2000 and either HIST 1 100 or POLS 1 100 
Introduction to the health policy process as a therapeutic nursing intervention. 

NURS 3000 PROFESSIONAL ROLE TRANSITIONS: SOCIALIZATION 4-0-4 

Prerequisite: admission to RN option program 

Socialization process through development of a conceptual and philosophical basis for profes- 
sional and advanced nursing practice. 

NURS 3150 PROFESSIONAL ROLE TRANSITIONS: COMMUNICATION 2-3-3 

Prerequisite: admission to RN option program 

Effective oral and written communication skills utilizing multimedia and technologic resources. 

NURS 3242 NURSING AND HEALTH PROMOTION II 2-3-3 

Prerequisite: HLPR 1200 and NURS 2241 and NURS 2260 

Promotion of psychosocial health using communication strategies and interpersonal skills to 

provide a basis for therapeutic nursing interventions. 

NURS 3300 HEALTH ASSESSMENT FOR THE PROMOTION OF WELLNESS 2-3-3 

Prerequisite: admission to RN option program 

Comprehensive health assessment of individuals using didactic and laboratory activities. 

NURS 3301 NURSING SKILLS I 0-3-1 

Prerequisite: permission of instructor or department and NURS 2241 and HLPR 1200 
Corequisite: NURS 3320 

Therapeutic nursing interventions to achieve selected outcomes using a modular approach to 
promote self-directed and active learning. 

NURS 3302 NURSING SKILLS II 0-3-1 

Prerequisite: NURS 3301 

Application of surgical asepsis and nursing care of the client and family in the perioperative 

setting. 

NURS 3310 NURSING AND HEALTH PROMOTION THROUGHOUT THE 
LIFESPAN 3-3-4 

Prerequisite: admission to RN option program 

Therapeutic nursing interventions to promote health and prevent illness of individuals throughout 

the life cycle. 

NURS 3320 HEALTH ASSESSMENT OF THE WELL INDIVIDUAL 2-3-3 

Prerequisite: permission of instructor or department and NURS 2241 

Corequisite: NURS 3242 

Application of techniques to assess the well individual. Variations and risk factors related to age, 

gender, and ethnic origin will be explored. 

NURS 3330 LEADERSHIP IN NURSING CARE 1-3-2 

Prerequisite or corequisite: NURS 3242 

Leadership role of the professional nurse in the management of health care. 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 229 



NURS 3340 FAMILY HEALTH PROMOTION 2-3-3 

Prerequisite or corequisite: NURS 3242 and NURS 3320 

Corequisite: NURS 3340L 

Theory based therapeutic nursing interventions for family health promotion. 

NURS 3350 HEALTH PROMOTION OF WOMEN AND CHILDREN 4-6-6 

Prerequisite or corequisite: NURS 3360 

Prerequisite: NURS 330 land NURS 3330 and NURS 3340 

Therapeutic nursing interventions to promote health and prevent illness of women and children. 

NURS 3360 HEALTH MAINTENANCE AND REHABILITATION 4-9-7 

Prerequisite: NURS 3330 and NURS 3340 

Corequisite: NURS 3302 

Critical thinking and use of therapeutic nursing interventions with clients experiencing chronic 

health promblems emphasizing continuity of care between, home, community and extended care 

settings. 

NURS 3450 HEALTH CARE AND FAMILIES 2-3-3 

Prerequisite: NURS 3310 

Corequisite: NURS 3150 

Therapeutic nursing interventions for family health promotion utilizing home visit experience, 

nursing case management and community resources. 

NURS 3550 PATHOPHYSIOLOGY 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: BIOL 2081 and BIOL 2082 

Physiologic changes and responses that produce signs and symptoms and the body's adaptive 

mechanisms to provide a rationale for preventive and therapeutic nursing interventions. 

NURS 4420 NURSING AND HEALTH RESTORATION 5-12-9 

Prerequisite or corequisite: NURS 3350 and NURS 3360 and NURS 3550 
Health restoration of clients experiencing acute health problems. 

NURS 4430 HEALTH RESTORATION IN MENTAL HEALTH 2-3-3 

Prerequisite or corequisite: NURS 3550 

Health restoration of clients with disruptions in mental health. 

NURS 4440 POPULATION FOCUSED NURSING 2-9-5 

Prerequisite: NURS 4420 and NURS 4430 

Functioning as a beginning practitioner in population focused nursing care. 

NURS 4450 PROFESSIONAL NURSING PRACTICUM 2-9-5 

Prerequisite: NURS 4420 and NURS 4430 

Leadership role of the professional nurse in selected clinical settings. 

NURS 4460 PROFESSIONAL NURSING SEMINAR 2-0-2 

Prerequisite: permission of instructor or department 

Prerequisite or corequisite: NURS 4200, NURS 4440, NURS 4450 

Exploration of nursing trends and issues. 

NURS 4470 NURSING AND POPULATION FOCUSED PRACTICE 2-9-5 

Prerequisite: completion of RN option courses 

The registered nurse learner as a beginning practitioner of population-focused nursing practice. 



230 ARMSTRONG ATLANTIC STATE UNIVERSITY 



NURS 4480 PROFESSIONAL NURSING PRACTICUM 2-9-5 

Prerequisite: completion of RN option courses 

The study of the leadership role of the professional nurse. Emphasis is placed on current trends 

and issues which influence change in nursing practice. 

NURS 4490 TOPICS IN PROFESSIONAL NURSING V-V-(l-2) 

The student, in consultation with the professor, selects a topic and submits a proposal for 
supervised independent study. 

OCEA - Oceanography 

OCEA 3100 INTRODUCTION TO OCEANOGRAPHY 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: 6 semester hours of science 

Basic principles of oceanography. The distribution of water over the earth, nature and relief of the 
ocean floors, tides and currents, chemical properties of sea water and constituents, and application 
of oceanographic research. 

PBHS - Public History 

PBHS 3800 INTRODUCTION TO PUBLIC HISTORY 3-0-3 

An introduction to the basic historiographic and anthropological approaches used in public history 
and a survey of the different disciplines such as archaeology, architecture, folklife, decorative arts, 
museum studies, and preservation which comprise public history. Crosslisted as ANTH 3800 and 
HIST 3800. 

PBHS 3820 INTRODUCTION TO ARCHAEOLOGY 3-0-3 

Survey of archaeology using cross-cultural examples. Focus on history, basic techniques, 
concepts, theories, and types of research. Crosslisted as ANTH 3820 and HIST 3820. 

PBHS 4871, -2 INDEPENDENT STUDY IN PUBLIC HISTORY 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: HIST 4500 

Available only by special arrangement with the history department, made in advance. Ask in the 

department for specific information. Crosslisted as HIST 4871, -2. 

PBHS 4980 INTERNSHIP IN PUBLIC HISTORY V-V-(l-3) 

Prerequisite: HIST 4500 

Off-campus study and research in an appropriate public or private agency or business. Supervision 
by the sponsoring organization and the academic instructor. May be repeated for credit. When 
graded on an S/U basis, credit only among electives. Must have at least nine additional hours of 
PBHS or PBHS cross-listed courses (with a minimum GPA of 3.0); an overall GPA of 2.5 (after 
completion of 72 semester hours); and an approved application. 

PBHS 5700U AMERICAN MATERIAL CULTURE 2-1-3 

Prerequisite: permission of instructor or department 

Introduction to the study of North American and Caribbean culture, ordinarily focused on the 
eighteenth and nineteenth century. Architecture, cemeteries, landscape, dress, music, art, foodway s, 
status, gender, and ethnic identifiers may provide examples. Crosslisted as ANTH 5700U and 
HIST 5700U. 

PBHS 5720U HISTORICAL ARCHAEOLOGY 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: HIST 3820 or PBHS 3820 or ANTH 3820 

The historical archaeology of the new world from the first arrival of Europeans and Africans to 
around 1800. Attention focused on the south and the Caribbean, but other frontier contexts may 
also be included. Emphasis given to anthropological archaeology as a perspective for the writing 
of history and as a sub-field within public history. Crosslisted as ANTH 5720U and HIST 5720U. 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 231 



PBHS 5730U FIELD WORK IN HISTORICAL ARCHAEOLOGY 0-12-6 

Prerequisite: HIST 3820 or PBHS 3820 or ANTH 3820 

Application of archaeological methods to a specific field project. Excavation techniques, 
surveying and map-making, data collecting and recording, and the interpretation of archaeologi- 
cal data. May be repeated for credit. Crosslisted as ANTH 5730U and HIST 5730U. 

PBHS 5740U PRACTICUM IN ARCHAEOLOGY V-V-3 

Prerequisite: HIST 3820 or PBHS 3820 or ANTH 3820 

Application of analytical techniques to a specific research problem. Individual research requiring 
artifact analysis, techniques from anthropological history, use of computer technologies, curation 
or conservation of archaeological data. May be repeated as topics vary. Crosslisted as ANTH 
5740U and HIST 5740U. 

PBHS 5750U FOLKLIFE 2-2-3 

Prerequisite: ANTH 1102 

The study of the creation and persistence of tradition in societies and of the process of change as 
demonstrated in such aspects as narrative, music, song, celebration, festival, belief, and material 
culture. Emphasis on understanding the multi-ethnic nature of the traditions in American life. 
Crosslisted as ANTH 5750U and HIST 5750U. 

PBHS 5770U ORAL HISTORY 1 -4-3 

Prerequisite: HIST 4500 

The study of how to prepare and conduct oral history interviews, how to transcribe, log, and index 
oral history recordings, and how to use oral history collections in writing research papers. 
Crosslisted as HIST 5770U. 

PBHS 5800U AMERICAN ARTS IN HISTORICAL PERSPECTIVE 3-0-3 

Survey of American visual arts including painting, sculpture, architecture, and the decorative arts. 
Examines artistic material culture as art and as a means to critical understanding of American life. 
Crosslisted as HIST 5800U. 

PBHS 5810U TOPICS IN ARCHITECTURAL HISTORY 2-1-3 

Study of selected topics in architectural history, including various styles of architecture (Geor- 
gian, federal, neoclassical, eclectic, and modern), and vernacular architecture. Recording techniques, 
research strategies, theoretical approaches, landscape architecture, field trips, and visiting 
lecturers. May be repeated as topics vary. Crosslisted as HIST 5810U. 

PBHS 5830U HISTORIC PRESERVATION 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: HIST4500 recommended 

Examination of the field including values, principles, development of planning and organization 

for preservation; preservation law, economics, and politics. 

PBHS 5850U MUSEUM STUDIES 2-2-3 

Development of museums in the United States and of the ethics and practices of the museum 
profession, to include collections management, planning, outreach, and public education. 

PBHS 5870U HERITAGE TOURISM 3-0-3 

History of tourism, with emphasis on heritage and tourism, and of the function and impact of 
tourism on guest and host societies. Aspects of the modern tourist industry and its products, Mich 
as promotional and travel literature, accommodations and transport, and tourist arts also in\ obli- 
gated. 

PBHS 5890U TOPICS IN PUBLIC HISTORY V-V-3 

Special topic in the field of public history defined by the instructor. Taught as a colloquium or 
seminar. Crosslisted as HIST 5890U. 



232 ARMSTRONG ATLANTIC STATE UNIVERSITY 



PEAT - Physical Education - Athletic Training 

PEAT 2100 PREVENTION AND CARE OF SPORT INJURIES 2-1-2 

Foundations of assessment, evaluation, theory, and practice of prevention, treatment, and care of 
sports related injuries. Provides student with American Red Cross safety, CPR and first aid 
certification. ARC safety, CPR, and first aid certification and fee required. 

PEAT 3450 EVALUATION AND TREATMENT OF LOWER BODY INJURIES 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: PEAT 2100 

Injury assessment procedures for the lumbar spine and lower extremities. 

PEAT 3460 EVALUATION AND TREATMENT OF UPPER BODY INJURIES 3-0-3 

Injury assessment procedures for the vertebral column, abdomen, and thorax. 

PEAT 4050 THERAPEUTIC MODALITIES AND REHABILITATION 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: PEAT 3450 and PEAT 3460 

Physical basis and physiological effects of agents and modalities used in the treatment of athletic 

injuries. Emphasis on the principles of rehabilitation. 

PEAT 4400 PLANNING AND MANAGEMENT OF ATHLETIC TRAINING 
PROGRAM AND FACILITY 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: PEAT 3450 and PEAT 3460 

Organizational and administrative components of an athletic training program pertaining to 

facility design, health care, financial management, training room management, and public 

relations. 

PEAT 4480 SEMINAR IN ATHLETIC TRAINING 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: PEAT 3450 and PEAT 3460 
Selected topics in athletic training. 

PEAT 5350U FIELD EXPERIENCE IN ATHLETIC TRAINING: 

TRAINING ROOM 0-6-3 

Prerequisite: permission of instructor or department and PEAT 2100 and PEAT 3450 and PEAT 

3460 

Management and operation of the Armstrong Atlantic training room. 

PEAT 5360U FIELD EXPERIENCE IN ATHLETIC TRAINING: LAB SCHOOL 0-6-3 

Prerequisite: permission of instructor or department and PEAT 2100 and PEAT 3450 and PEAT 

3460 

Coverage of athletics at affiliated lab school. 

PEAT 5370U FIELD EXPERIENCE IN ATHLETIC TRAINING: CLINIC 0-6-3 

Development of skills and techniques of athletic training as associated with a sports medicine 
clinic. 

PEBC - Physical Education Activities 

PEBC 1000 BEGINNING WEIGHT TRAINING 0-2-1 

Mechanical principles and techniques necessary for the understanding of weight training pro- 
grams. 

PEBC 1010 LIFETIME FITNESS TRAINING 0-3-1 

Basic fitness concepts and their application to everyday life. Participation in an individualized 
program of aerobic activity. 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 233 



PEBC 1020 AEROBIC DANCE 0-3-1 

A combination of exercise and dance steps to improve the cardiovascular system, muscular 
endurance, strength, and flexibility. 

PEBC 1070 TEAM SPORTS 0-2-1 

Consists of two of the following sports: basketball, volleyball, soccer, and softball. 

PEBC 1080 BOWLING 0-2-1 

Basic skills in bowling. Minimum of two games required per class period at student's expense. 
Must provide own transportation. 

PEBC 1090 ARCHERY 0-2-1 

Basic skills in archery for recreational use. Students must provide own arm and finger guards. 

PEBC 1100 TUMBLING AND STUNTS 0-2-1 

Fundamentals and practice in beginning tumbling and gymnastic apparatus. 

PEBC 1301 BASIC SWIMMING SKILLS 0-3-1 

Skills and strokes for the student unfamiliar with or afraid of the water and who cannot swim. 

PEBC 1302 INTERMEDIATE SWIMMING 0-2-1 

Six basic strokes, skills, endurance, and knowledge pertaining to safety in, on, or about water. 

PEBC 1350 BEGINNING SCUBA 0-3-1 

Beginning recreational scuba diving activities in local aquatic environments. Additional fee is 
required. Must provide own transportation. 

PEBC 1380 WATER AEROBICS AND EXERCISE 0-3-1 

Principles of cardiorespiratory fitness associated with aquatics and resistance training. No 
swimming skills required. 

PEBC 1401 ELEMENTARY TENNIS 0-2-1 

Basic skills, rules, strategies, and practice for singles and doubles in tennis. Student must provide 
own racket and one can of new tennis balls. 

PEBC 1402 INTERMEDIATE TENNIS 0-2-1 

Advanced techniques and knowledge of skills and strategy in tennis. 

PEBC 1450 BADMINTON 0-2-1 

Basic skills, rules, strategies, and practice for singles and doubles. 

PEBC 1501 BEGINNING MODERN DANCE 0-2-1 

Art of modern dance including technique, exercise, basic improvisation, dance positions, and 
locomotor movement. 

PEBC 1502 INTERMEDIATE MODERN DANCE 0-2-1 

Continuation of PEBC 1501 with emphasis on dynamics, composition, and choreography. 

PEBC 1551 BASIC BALLET 0-2-1 

A review of basic ballet steps, exercises, and stretches. Emphasis on body placement and practice 
in using steps in combinations. 

PEBC 1552 INTERMEDIATE BALLET 0-2-1 

Advanced techniques and knowledge; refinement of ballet skills. 

PEBC 1580 JAZZ DANCING 0-2-1 

Modern, lyrical, and hip hop forms of jazz, including fundamental techniques and choreography. 



234 ARMSTRONG ATLANTIC STATE UNIVERSITY 



PEBC 1601 BEGINNING GOLF 0-2-1 

Basic techniques and instruction for the beginning golfer. Minimum of 9 holes of golf must be 
played outside of class at student's expense. Must provide 12 shag balls for class. 

PEBC 1602 INTERMEDIATE GOLF 0-2-1 

Prerequisite: PEBC 1601 or permission of instructor 

Review and refinement of beginning skills, etiquette, and strategies of golf. Must provide own 

transportation to off-campus site. 

PEBC 2000 CONCEPTS OF FITNESS 2-1-3 

Theoretical knowledge and practical experience in the principles, assessment, and development 
of fitness for living. Students will develop and implement personalized fitness programs. 

PEEC - Physical Education Elective 

PEEC 2000 COMMUNITY FIRST AID AND CPR 3-0-2 

The American Red Cross advanced course in safety and first aid and adult, child, and infant CPR. 
To receive a certification card, students must pay an administrative fee to the American Red Cross. 

PEEC 2180 OFFICIATING TEAM SPORTS 2-2-2 

Rules, mechanics and ethics involved in officiating a variety of team sports activities. Students 
must provide own equipment appropriate to the sports and transportation for off-campus 
assignment. 

PEEC 3120 COACHING FOOTBALL 3-0-2 

Instruction and practice in fundamental skills and team play. Minimum of two games must be 
scouted at student's expense. 

PEEC 3130 COACHING BASKETBALL 3-0-2 

Instruction and practice in fundamental skills and team play, emphasizing methods and drills used 
by leading coaches. Minimum of two games must be scouted at student's expense. 

PEEC 3140 COACHING BASEBALL AND SOFTBALL 3-0-2 

Instruction and practice in fundamental skills and team play, emphasizing methods and drills used 
by leading coaches. Minimum of two games must be scouted at students expense. 

PEEC 3150 COACHING VOLLEYBALL AND SOCCER 3-0-2 

Rules and fundamental skills of volleyball and soccer, and individual development and applica- 
tion of successful coaching methods. 

PEEC 3200 HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION FOR THE ELEMENTARY 
SCHOOL TEACHER 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: admission to teacher education 

Theory and current practice in the teaching of health and physical education at elementary school 

level including a directed field experience. 

PEEC 3330 LIFEGUARD TRAINING 1-2-2 

Recognizing and responding to aquatic mishaps; pool health, sanitation, and management; spinal 
injury management; and CPR/PR. 

PEEC 3340 WATER SAFETY INSTRUCTOR 2-2-2 

Methods of teaching infant and pre-school aquatics, the seven levels of "learn to swim program," 
as well as community water safety, ICT and safety training for swim coaches. Must be at least 17 
years old and have Level VI swim skills. 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 235 



PEEC 4130 SPECIAL TOPICS IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: open to majors in health and physical education 
Research methods in health and physical education. 

PEEC 5580U PHYSICAL ACTIVITY AND THE OLDER ADULT 3-0-3 

The impact of fitness activities in the lives of older adults focusing upon the physiological benefits 
associated with leading an active life and their effects upon the quality and quantity of life. 

PEHM - Physical Education - Health Major 

PEHM 2281 HUMAN STRUCTURE AND FUNCTION I 3-0-3 

Anatomy and physiology of the major body systems. 

PEHM 2282 HUMAN STRUCTURE AND FUNCTION II 2-1-2 

Prerequisite: PEHM 2281 

Continuation of the study of the anatomical and physiological systems of the human body. 

Laboratory experiences for further exploration. 

PEHM 2283 KINESIOLOGY 2-1-2 

Prerequisite: PEHM 2281 

Role of skeletal muscles in producing body movements through the application of the laws of 

mechanical physics. 

PEHM 2500 FOUNDATIONS OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION 3-0-3 

Survey of historical foundations, interrelationships of health and physical education and the 
development of current progressive programs including the uses and availability of technology. 

PEHM 2701 TEAM SPORT TECHNIQUES I 3-0-3 

Analysis, demonstration, and application of basic skills and techniques necessary for instruction 
in flag/touch football, soccer, and softball. 

PEHM 2702 TEAM SPORT TECHNIQUES II 3-0-3 

Analysis, demonstration, and application of basic skills and techniques necessary for instruction 
in basketball, speedball, and volleyball. 

PEHM 2900 TECHNOLOGY IN HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION 1-2-2 

Examination of visual technology and computers including their applications to the teaching of 
health and physical education. 

PEHM 3000 CURRENT HEALTH EDUCATION ISSUES 3-0-3 

Discussion of disease, wellness, stress management, nutrition, exercise, weight management, 
lifestyle and health consumer issues, and aging. 

PEHM 3050 THEORY AND TECHNIQUES OF DANCE 1-1-1 

History, background, teaching techniques, and evolution of the various forms of dance including 
square, folk, social, and modern. 

PEHM 3060 RECREATIONAL GAMES 0-2-1 

Instruction in recreational games and activities in diverse settings and with diverse populations. 

PEHM 3070 AQUATICS 1-1-2 

Instruction in the six basic swimming strokes, basic rescue and water safety information and 
practices, water sport activities, and water exercise principles and teaching techniques. 



236 ARMSTRONG ATLANTIC STATE UNIVERSITY 

PEHM 3080 OUTDOOR EDUCATION 1-1-1 

Knowledge, attitudes, and skills for a wiser use of the outdoors and our natural resources. 

PEHM 3500 EXERCISE PHYSIOLOGY 2-1-2 

Prerequisite: PEHM 2280 and PEHM 2281 

Response of the major body organ systems to exercise, with laboratory procedures in exercise 

physiology. 

PEHM 3700 INDIVIDUAL AND DUAL SPORTS 3-1-3 

Analysis, demonstration, and application of basic skills and techniques necessary for instruction 
in individual and dual sports. 

PEHM 3770 HEALTH AND HUMAN SEXUALITY EDUCATION 3-0-3 

Health promotion strategies dealing with sexual behavior, sexually transmitted diseases, preg- 
nancy, pregnancy prevention, and parenthood. Emphasis on interventions and curriculum materials 
available for teachers and health educators. 

PEHM 3780 SUBSTANCE ABUSE EDUCATION 2-0-2 

Detailed background information on the categories of drugs, chemical misuse, abuse, prevention, 
treatment, along with curriculum and age-appropriate teaching strategies. 

PEHM 3800 SPORTS STRATEGIES AND METHODS 2-1-2 

Prerequisite: PEHM 2701 and PEHM 2702 and PEHM 3700 

Strategies and instructional methods utilized in the teaching of individual, dual and team sports. 

PEHM 4050 SCHOOL HEALTH EDUCATION 3-0-3 

Analysis of the collaborative efforts of the school health services program, community health 
services, and the comprehensive school health education curriculum to meet the needs of diverse 
school populations. Examination of growth and developmental characteristics of school aged 
children within a range of "norm" and its effect on a teacher's ability to teach effectively. 

PEHM 4200 ASSESSMENT IN HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION 
PROGRAMS 2-1-2 

Motor, perceptual, and performance needs for multiple student populations with an analysis and 
application of published and teacher-developed instruments. 

PEHM 4300 MANAGEMENT SKILLS IN HEALTH AND PHYSICAL 

EDUCATION 2-0-2 

Theory and application of management and organization skills unique to the health and physical 
education environment. 

PEHM 4400 FITNESS THEORY AND APPLICATION 1-1-2 

An examination of the health-related and motor-related physical fitness components. 

PEHM 4701 ELEMENTARY CURRICULUM AND METHODS 3-1-3 

Theory and current practice in the teaching of elementary physical education including develop- 
ing appropriate curriculum, applying appropriate teaching strategies, and writing an inclusive 
portfolio which will be taught in a local elementary school as a directed field experience. 

PEHM 4702 CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT AND APPLICATION IN 

HEALTH EDUCATION 2-0-3 

Prerequisite: admission to teacher education, PEHM 3770 and HSCP 3770 and PEHM 3780 
Corequisite: PEAT 2100 

Development and application of health education curriculum in the school environment with 
emphasis upon portfolio preparation and the choice and application of appropriate techniques and 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 237 



methods of teaching health information and effective approaches in the development of positive 
life skills. 

PEHM 4703 MIDDLE/SECONDARY PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

CURRICULUM AND METHODS 3-2-4 

Prerequisite: admission to teacher education and PEHM 2701 and PEHM 2702 and PEHM 2900 

and PEHM 3700 and PEHM 3800 

Corequisite: PEHM 4200 and PEHM 4300 

Theory and current practices in the design and development of curriculum, the selection and 

application of appropriate teaching strategies and techniques, and the development of a middle 

and secondary teaching portfolio in physical education. 

PEHM 4900 STUDENT TEACHING/SEMINAR 2-V-(9-12) 

Prerequisite: admission to teacher education 

Opportunities to use knowledge and skills in a supervised public school setting. 

PHIL - Philosophy 

PHIL 2201 INTRODUCTION TO PHILOSOPHY 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: ENGL 1101 

Basic themes, problems, vocabulary, and representative figures of philosophy. Includes an essay 

or projects involving documentation. 

PHIL 2251 INTRODUCTION TO ETHICS AND CONTEMPORARY 

MORAL PHILOSOPHY 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: ENGL 1101 

Ethical traditions of western culture and their application of historic perspectives to contemporary 

moral issues in medicine, business, and environmental relations. 

PHIL 3110 ANCIENT PHILOSOPHY 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: ENGL 1101 

Ancient philosophy with special emphasis on the Pre-Socratics, Plato, Aristotle, the Stoics, 

Epicureans, Skeptics, and Neo-Platonism. 

PHIL 3120 MEDIEVAL PHILOSOPHY AND THE RISE OF HUMANISM 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: ENGL 1101 

Medieval philosophy and the rise of humanistic studies in the Renaissance, with emphasis on 

Boethius, Augustine, Acquinas, Anselm, Occam, Erasmus, Bacon, Machiavelli, and Montaigne. 

PHIL 3130 CONTINENTAL RATIONALISM AND BRITISH EMPIRICISM 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: ENGL 1101 

The modern rationalist tradition and its rival empirical tradition, with emphasis on Descartes, 

Spinoza, and Leibniz; and on Hobbes, Locke, Berkeley, and Hume. 

PHIL 3140 KANT AND THE 19TH CENTURY 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: ENGL 1101 

Nineteenth century philosophy with emphasis on Kant, Hegel, Schopenhauer, Marx, James, 

Kierkegarrd, and Nietzsche. 

PHIL 3150 TWENTIETH CENTURY PHILOSOPHY 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: ENGL 1101 

Twentieth century schools and trends in philosophy as exhibited by such figures as Heidegger. 

Whitehead, Moore, Wittgenstein, Sartre, and Ayer. 



238 ARMSTRONG ATLANTIC STATE UNIVERSITY 



PHIL 3200 TECHNOLOGY, SOCIETY, AND HUMAN VALUES 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: ENGL 1101 

A philosophical exploration of the formative impact of technology on the character of modern 
culture and human values. The study of competing descriptions and definitions of technology as 
well as questions regarding effective human control of technology, the moral neutrality of 
technology, and the effects of technology on conceptual paradigms, language, politics, econom- 
ics, science, education, art, and religion. 

PHIL 3330 PHILOSOPHY OF RELIGION 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: ENGL 1101 and at least one philosophy course 

Major problems arising in the encounter between philosophy and religious belief (reason and 
faith). Emphasis on the validity and nature of religious belief, the problem of evil, as well as the 
meaning and status of religious language. 

PHIL 3340 SYMBOLIC LOGIC 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: ENGL 1101 and at least one philosophy course 

Formal logic and the techniques of symbolism used for analyzing the validity of formal deductive 

systems. Emphasis on the analysis of truth functions, qualification theory, and the theory of 

relations. 

PHIL 4000 SPECIAL TOPICS 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: ENGL 1101 

Offered on demand. Focuses either on a topic such as existentialism, aesthetics, philosophy of 
science, philosophy of language, philosophy and literature, or on one great ancient, medieval, or 
modern philosopher such as Plato, Aristotle, Augustine, Aquinas, Descartes, Hume, Kant, Hegel, 
Nietzsche, Whitehead, Sartre or Wittgenstein. 

PHIL 4900 INDEPENDENT STUDY 1-0-1 

Prerequisite: ENGL 1 101 and PHIL 3000 

Offered on demand. The student, with the advice and permission of the supervising professor, 
selects the topic and submits a prospectus for department approval before the semester in which 
the course is to be taken. Transient students may take this course only with permission of the 
department head. 

PHSC - Physical Science 

PHSC 1211 PHYSICAL ENVIRONMENT 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: eligibility for MATH 1111 

Fundamental concepts, laws, and theories of physics. For non-science majors interested in a 
quantitative survey of the physics underlying the universe, including motion, energy, electricity, 
and astronomy. 

PHSC 1211L PHYSICAL ENVIRONMENT LAB 0-2-1 

Corequisite: PHSC 1211 

Laboratory investigations of the fundamental concepts, laws, and theories of physics. 

PHSC 1212 CHEMICAL ENVIRONMENT 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: eligibility for MATH 1111 

Fundamental concepts, laws, and theories of chemistry. For non-science majors interested in a 
quantitative survey of the chemistry underlying our world, including classification of the 
elements, basic chemical reactions, atomic structure, and earth science. 

PHSC 1212L CHEMICAL ENVIRONMENT LAB 0-2-1 

Corequisite: PHSC 1212 

Laboratory investigations of the fundamental concepts, laws, and theories of chemistry. 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 239 



PHTH - Physical Therapy 

PHTH 5101U FUNCTIONAL AND STRUCTURAL ASPECTS OF 

MOVEMENT I 5-3-6 

Corequisite: PHTH 5131U and PHTH 5161U and PHTH 5181U 

Open only to physical therapy majors. Gross anatomy, physiology, pathophysiology and kinesi- 
ology of the back, head, neck, and upper and lower limbs. 

PHTH 5131U FOUNDATIONS OF PHYSICAL THERAPY ASSESSMENT AND 
TREATMENT I 6-4-8 

Corequisite: PHTH 5101U and PHTH 5161U and PHTH 5181U 

Open only to physical therapy majors. Fundamental patient care skills including basic evaluation. 

Treatment and documentation for patients with musculoskeletal and integumentary dysfunction. 

PHTH 5161U PHYSICAL THERAPY PRACTICE ISSUES I 2-0-2 

Corequisite: PHTH 5101U and PHTH 5131U and PHTH 5181U 

Open only to physical therapy majors. Discussions of professional socialization, clinical docu- 
mentation, legal and ethical aspects of health care and psychosocial aspects of illness, disability 
and health care, scope of practice vs. scope of abilities, the disabled/impaired practitioner, and 
"burn-out" syndrome. Case studies will link the material presented in this course with other 
courses taught in this semester. 

PHTH 5181U CLINICAL PRACTICUM I 1-0-1 

Corequisite: PHTH 5 101 U and PHTH 5131U and PHTH 5161 U 

Open only to physical therapy majors. Initial exposure to the health care setting and health care 
professionals through discussion and half-day on-site observational experiences. Care settings 
will include specialty clinics, long term care facilities, hospitals, and school systems. 

PHTH 5202U FUNCTIONAL AND STRUCTURAL ASPECTS OF 

MOVEMENT II 4-3-5 

Prerequisite: PHTH 5101U and 5121U and 5161U and 5181U 
Corequisite: PHTH 5232U and 5262U and 5282U and 5290U 
Gross anatomy, physiology and pathophysiology of the heart and lungs and nervous system. 

PHTH 5232U FOUNDATIONS OF PHYSICAL THERAPY ASSESSMENT AND 
TREATMENT II 6-4-8 

Prerequisite: PHTH 5101U and 5131U and 5161U and 5181U 

Corequisite: PHTH 5202U and 5262U and 5282U and 5290U 

Fundamental patient care skills including basic evaluation, treatment and documentation for 

patients with cardiopulmonary and neuromuscular dysfunction. 

PHTH 5262U PHYSICAL THERAPY PRACTICE ISSUES II 2-0-2 

Prerequisite: PHTH 5010U and 513 1U and 5161 U and 5181 U 
Corequisite: PHTH 5202U and 5232U and 5282U and 5290U 

Discussions of legislative issues in health care, cultural issues in health care, health promotion and 
injury prevention education, adult learning skills used in patient and family education, quantita- 
tive terminology in clinical practice and documentation, and a critical analysis of physical therap\ 
research. 

PHTH 5282U CLINICAL PRACTICUM II 0-3-1 

Prerequisite: PHTH 5101U and 5131U and 5161U and 5181U 

Corequisite: PHTH 5202U and 5232U and 5262U and 5292U 

A one-week, full-time, hands-on exposure to patient care in a physical therapy setting. Physical 

therapy settings include specialty clinics, long term care facilities, hospitals, and school \\ stems. 



240 ARMSTRONG ATLANTIC STATE UNIVERSITY 



PHTH 5290U PHYSICAL THERAPY CASE MANAGEMENT 2-4-3 

Prerequisite: PHTH 5101U and 5131U and 5161U and 5181U 

Corequisite: PHTH 5202U and 5232U and 5262U and 5282U 

Presentation of specific cases for students to manage from referral to discharge, utilizing given 

information with increasingly complicated scenarios. Students work in small groups to develop 

total management of each case. Cases presented will link this course to all other courses in this 

and the previous semester. 

PHYS - Physics 

PH YS 1111 INTRODUCTORY PHYSICS I 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: MATH 1113 

Prerequisite or corequisite: PHYS 1 1 1 1L 

Introductory mechanics, thermodynamics, and waves using elementary algebra and trigonometry. 

PHYS 1111L INTRODUCTORY PHYSICS I LAB 0-3-1 

Prerequisite: MATH 1113 

Prerequisite or corequisite: PHYS 1111 

Laboratory investigation of the concepts of mechanics, thermodynamics, and waves. 

PHYS 1112 INTRODUCTORY PHYSICS II 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: PHYS 1111 

Prerequisite or corequisite: PHYS 1 1 12L 

Introductory electromagnetism, optics, and modern physics using elementary algebra and 

trigonometry. 

PHYS 1112L INTRODUCTORY PHYSICS II LAB 0-3-1 

Prerequisite or corequisite: PHYS 1112 

Laboratory investigations of the concepts of electricity, magnetism, geometric and physical 

optics, and modern physics. 

PHYS 2211 PRINCIPLES OF PHYSICS I 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: MATH 1161 

Prerequisite or corequisite: PHYS 221 1L 

Introductory mechanics, thermodynamics, and waves using elementary differential calculus. 

PHYS 2211L PRINCIPLES OF PHYSICS I LAB 0-3-1 

Prerequisite or corequisite: PHYS 221 1 

Laboratory investigation of the concepts of mechanics, thermodynamics and waves. 

PHYS 2212 PRINCIPLES OF PHYSICS II 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: PHYS 2211 and MATH 2072 

Prerequisite or corequisite: PHYS 2212L 

Introductory electromagnetism, optics, and modern physics using elementary differential and 

integral calculus. 

PHYS 2212L PRINCIPLES OF PHYSICS II LAB 0-3-1 

Prerequisite or corequisite: PHYS 2212 

Laboratory investigations of the concepts of electricity and magnetism, optics, and modern 

physics. 

PHYS 3100 ELECTRICAL CIRCUIT ANALYSIS 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: PHYS 2212 

Prerequisite or corequisite: MATH 341 1 

Basic laws of electrical circuits: RCL circuits, nodal and mesh analysis. Thevenin's and Norton's 

theorems; phasors, magnetically coupled circuits, and two-port parameters. 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 241 



PHYS 3120 DIGITAL ELECTRONICS 1-6-3 

Prerequisite: MATH 1113 and 8 semester hours of lab science 

Introduction to discrete components and integrated circuits. Hands-on lab experience in construct- 
ing and investigating an array of digital circuits that are directly applicable in instrumentation. 

PHYS 3210 INTERMEDIATE MECHANICS 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: MATH 2072 and ENGR 2200 

Kinematics of particles and rigid bodies; kinetics of particles and rigid bodies using force-mass- 
acceleration, work-energy, and momentum methods in two- and three-dimensional motion. 
Computer modelling of mechanical systems. 

PHYS 3220 MECHANICS OF DEFORMABLE BODIES 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: ENGR 2200 

Internal effects and dimension changes of solids resulting from external applied loads; shear and 

bending moment diagrams, analysis of stress and strain; beam deflection; column stability. 

PHYS 3230 FLUID MECHANICS 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: MATH 34 1 1 and either ENGR 22 10 or PHYS 32 10 and either PHYS 3300 or PHYS 

3400 

Fluid statics; analysis of fluid motion using the continuity, momentum, and energy conservation 

relationships; introduction to viscous flows. 

PHYS 3300 THERMODYNAMICS 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: PHYS 2212 and MATH 2072 

Basic concepts of thermodynamic properties of substances; conservation principles; the first and 

second laws of thermodynamics; entropy; analysis of thermodynamics systems. 

PHYS 3400 CHEMICAL THERMODYNAMICS 3-3-4 

Prerequisite: CHEM 1212 and PHYS 221 1 and MATH 2072 

Fundamental principles and theories of physical chemistry. Gas laws, heat and work, and the laws 
of thermodynamics. Material and reaction equilibria and thermodynamic functions. Single and 
multi-component phase equilibria, ideal and non-ideal solutions. Practical application of these 
fundamental principles of physical chemistry in the laboratory. 

PHYS 3500 DIFFRACTION AND CRYSTALLOGRAPHY 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: PHYS 3801 

Diffraction and crystal structure with identification from single crystal and powder patterns. 

Lattice parameters and crystal orientation. 

PHYS 3801 OPTICS AND MODERN PHYSICS 2-0-2 

Prerequisite: PHYS 2212 or both MATH 1 161 and PHYS 1112 

Optics and modern physics, including geometric and physical optics, relativity, atomic physics, 

and nuclear physics. 

PHYS 3801L OPTICS AND MODERN PHYSICS LAB 0-3-1 

Prerequisite or corequisite: PHYS 3801 

Laboratory investigation of the concepts of geometric and physical optics, relativity, atomic 

physics, and nuclear physics. 

PHYS 3802 INTERMEDIATE MODERN PHYSICS 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: MATH 2072 and PHYS 3801 

Introduction to quantum mechanical principles with applications in atomic and molecular 

structure. 



242 ARMSTRONG ATLANTIC STATE UNIVERSITY 



PHYS 4120 SCIENTIFIC MEASUREMENT WITH DIGITAL INTERFACING 1-6-3 

Prerequisite: PHYS 3120 and CSCI 1301 

Principles and techniques used in measuring physical quantities, including transducers, data 
acquisition interfaces(A/D, D/A, DIO), GPIB, and data analysis. Data acquisition and process 
control capabilities of the computer as a general purpose lab instrument. Hands-on lab experience 
through applications in experimental physics. 

PHYS 4170 ADVANCED MECHANICS 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: MATH 2072 and either PHYS llllor PHYS 2211 (also recommended: PHYS 1112 

or PHYS 2212 and MATH 341 1) 

Statics, kinematics, and dynamics of particles and of systems of particles from Newtonian 

principles. 

PHYS 4900 INDEPENDENT STUDY IN PHYSICS V-V-(l-3) 

Prerequisite: permission of instructor or department 

Open to juniors or above. Research or study in physics under the supervision of a member of the 
physics faculty. Research activities will require the presentation of a written report. Studies of 
special topics will require the completion of written exams. Both the credit and the proposed work 
must be approved in writing by the faculty member who will supervise the work and by the 
department head. Open to transient students only with the permission of the department head. 
Offered by special arrangement. 

PHYS 4950 SPECIAL TOPICS IN PHYSICS V-V-(l-3) 

Prerequisite: announced with the topic; permission of instructor or department 

Advanced study in an area of physics not covered elsewhere. Topics are chosen from all areas of 

physics, and will be announced when the course is offered. Offered by special arrangement. 

PHYS 4960 PHYSICS INTERNSHIP V-V-(l-lO) 

Prerequisite: ENGR 2200 and PHYS 3 1 00 and either PHYS 3300 or PHYS 3400 and permission 
of instructor or department 

Project in industry or government to be determined, supervised, and evaluated by the sponsor of 
the activity and physics intern program director. Application and arrangements must be made 
through the department by mid-semester preceding the semester of internship. Open to transient 
students only with the permission of the department head. Offered by special arrangement. 

POLS - Political Science 

POLS 1100 POLITICAL HISTORY OF AMERICA AND GEORGIA 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: eligibility for ENGL 1101 

Origins and development of constitutional theory and its political, intellectual, and cultural impact 
on American society from the seventeenth century to the present. Emphasis is placed on the 
political history of Georgia and the principles of its constitution. Crosslisted as HIST 1 100. 

POLS 1150 WORLD POLITICS 2-0-2 

Prerequisite: eligibility for ENGL 1101 

Comparative political systems with emphasis on the variety of world polities. Differences in 
government structure, policy, and political traditions. Democratization, modernization, national- 
ism, the future of the nation state, the end of the Cold War, and the potential of developing nations. 

POLS 1200 ETHICAL THEORIES AND MORAL ISSUES IN GOVERNMENT 2-0-2 

Prerequisite: eligibility for ENGL 1101 

Ethics of citizenship, policy-making, and governance. Classical and modern theories of justice, 

with emphasis on collective goods and individual rights. 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 243 



POLS 2100 INTRODUCTION TO POLITICAL SCIENCE 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: eligibility for ENGL 1101 

Study of federal, state, and international political systems, with emphasis on concepts of 
sovereignty, constitutionalism, functions of government, political culture, and ideology. Analysis 
of the federal constitution, Georgia state constitution, and other constitutional frameworks. 

POLS 2150 CAREERS IN POLITICAL SCIENCE AND PUBLIC 
ADMINISTRATION 1-0-1 

Prerequisite: POLS 2100 and either PUBL 2601 or POLS 2601 

How to apply the political science and public administration disciplines to careers in public 
service. Emphasis on creating a plan for professional development, a personality profile, skills 
assessment, researching career clusters in public service, field interviews, developing a plan for 
a job search. Crosslisted as PUBL 2150. 

POLS 2201 STATE AND LOCAL GOVERNMENT 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: eligibility for ENGL 1101 

Comparative study of local governments, and their management of political conflict. Emphasis 
on federalism, political culture, community power, tax and budget systems, and public policy 
issues facing states and communities. 

POLS 2250 INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS 2-0-2 

Prerequisite: eligibility for ENGL 1101 

Origin, principles, and functions of regional and global organizations transcending national 
boundaries. Organizational structures with emphasis on geopolitics creating structures, their 
functions and dysfunctions. Crosslisted as PUBL 2250. 

POLS 2290 FOUNDATIONS OF INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS 2-0-2 

Prerequisite: eligibility for ENGL 1101 

Relations between and among nation-states as posited in the context of diplomacy and interna- 
tional law. Theoretical frameworks for the analysis of selected historical and contemporary 
international problems and opportunities. 

POLS 2390 HUMAN VALUES AND PUBLIC PROBLEMS 2-0-2 

Prerequisite: eligibility for ENGL 1101 

Analysis of the normative aspects of public problems. Themes include technology and society, 
conflict between individual freedom and collective responsibility, social justice, the ethics of 
communication, relationships between humanity and the environment, and the role of government 
in a multicultural society. 

POLS 2601 FOUNDATIONS OF PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: eligibility for ENGL 1 101 and either POLS 1 100 or POLS 2100 
Elements of public administration. Emphasis on bureaucracy, administrative power, informal 
groups, issue networks, budgeting, implementation, decision making, personnel, and ethics in 
public service. Crosslisted as PUBL 2601. 

POLS 3170 CONSTITUTIONAL LAW AND THE FEDERAL SYSTEM 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: POLS 2100 and either HIST 1 100 or POLS 1 100 

United States Supreme Court opinions on the Constitution. Emphasis on powers of the national 
government, judicial review, federalism, commerce power, separation of powers, power to tax and 
spend, and state regulation. 

POLS 3180 CONSTITUTIONAL CIVIL LIBERTIES 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: POLS 2100 and either HIST 1 100 or POLS 1 100 

United States Supreme Court opinions on the Constitution. Emphasis on individual rights, 
nationalization, of the Bill of Rights, substantive, and procedural due process, freedom of 
expression, association, religion, privacy, and equal protection. 



244 ARMSTRONG ATLANTIC STATE UNIVERSITY 



POLS 3210 INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS: EAST ASIA 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: POLS 2100 and either HIST 1 100 or POLS 1 100 

Contemporary international politics in East Asia in terms of ongoing historical trends such as the 
decline of imperialism, rise of nationalism, and the superpower interactions during the Cold War 
and post-Cold War eras. Further emphasis on the political economy of the Asian Pacific rim states 
toward the twenty-first century. 

POLS 3260 INTERNATIONAL LAW 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: POLS 2100 and either HIST 1 100 or POLS 1 100 

International agreements, cases, and customs on the legal relationships between nations. Empha- 
sis on recognition, state succession, jurisdiction, extradition, nationality, treaties, diplomacy, and 
war. 

POLS 3300 POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY: ANCIENT AND MEDIEVAL 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: POLS 2100 and either HIST 1 100 or POLS 1 100 

Primary sources of western political thought from ancient Greece to the renaissance. The political 
ideas of Plato, Aristotle, Judaism, Christianity, Islam, Roman natural law and stoicism, and the 
late revival of civic republicanism. 

POLS 3310 MODERN POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: POLS 2100 and either HIST 1 100 or POLS 1 100 

Primary sources of western thought from the sixteenth to nineteenth century. The political ideas 
of the Protestant Reformation, the social contract theories, of Hobbes, Locke, and Rousseau, 
utilitarianism, the impact of the French Revolution, nationalism, and socialism. 

POLS 3320 AMERICAN POLITICAL THOUGHT 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: POLS 2100 and either HIST 1 100 or POLS 1 100 

Ideological traditions in American politics. Atlantic republicanism, Lockean liberalism, 

Jeffersonism, Jacksonian democracy, nineteenth and twentieth century reform and radical 

movements, pragmatism, neoconservatism, and the influence of religion on American political 

thought. 

POLS 3330 CONTEMPORARY POLITICAL THOUGHT 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: POLS 2100 and either HIST 1 100 or POLS 1 100 

Ideological currents of our time. Selected in-depth readings from original sources. 

POLS 3420 POLITICS OF UNDERDEVELOPMENT: AFRICA AND LATIN 
AMERICA 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: POLS 2100 and either HIST 1 100 or POLS 1 100 

Contemporary global patterns of dependency and interdependency. Legacy of colonialism; role 
of military in politics; nationalist regimes and movements; democratization; ethnic conflicts; 
environmental problems; political geography. 

POLS 3460 GOVERNMENTS OF EAST ASIA 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: POLS 2100 and either HIST 1 100 or POLS 1 100 

Comparative examination of the contemporary political institutions, processes, and ideas of the 
Peoples Republic of China, Japan, and two Koreas. Emphasis on historical, social, cultural, and 
contemporary issues. 

POLS 3480 GOVERNMENTS OF WESTERN EUROPE 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: POLS 2100 and either HIST 1 100 or POLS 1 100 

Comparison of the major western European governments, emphasizing the forces impacting 

political stability in parliamentary systems. 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 245 



POLS 3490 THE POLITICAL TRANSFORMATION OF THE 

FORMER SOVIET UNION 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: POLS 2100 and either HIST 1 100 or POLS 1 100 

Political change in the former Soviet Union with emphasis on the new direction of the political, 
economic and social transformation of the regime. Comparison of tsarist autocracy, Soviet 
totalitarianism, and the contemporary Russian political system. 

POLS 3990 SPECIAL TOPICS IN PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION/POLITICAL 
SCIENCE 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: permission of instructor or department and POLS 2100 and either PUBL 2601 or 
POLS 2601 

Topics and issues not available in other courses. Topics will be announced before each offering 
of the course. Crosslisted as PUBL 3990. 

POLS 4010 POLITICS OF BUDGETARY PROCESS 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: POLS 2100 and either PUBL 2601 or POLS 2601 

Procedures and strategies for national, state, and local government budgets. Emphasis on politics, 
fiscal and monetary policy, revenue systems, audits, planning, and accounting systems. Crosslisted 
as PUBL 4010. 

POLS 4030 PUBLIC POLICY DEVELOPMENT 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: POLS 2100 and either PUBL 2601 or POLS 2601 

Decision making for public policy. Emphasis on decision making theories, politics of the policy- 
making process, mobilization of political support, cost and benefits of selected public policies, and 
application of decision theory to selected public policy issues. Crosslisted as PUBL 4030 

POLS 4050 PRINCIPLES OF PUBLIC MANAGEMENT 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: POLS 2100 and either PUBL 2601 or POLS 2601 

Theory and cases on the management of public and non-profit agencies. Emphasis on total quality 

management, rational and incremental decision making, cost benefit analysis, politics and public 

policy of decision making, accountability measures, and political culture. Crosslisted as PUBL 

4050. 

POLS 4100 INDEPENDENT STUDY IN AMERICAN GOVERNMENT V-V-(l-3) 

Prerequisite: permission of instructor or department, or POLS 2100 

Advanced, or individualized topics on American government. Emphasis on individual research. 

reading, and scholarly writing. 

POLS 4110 AMERICAN PRESIDENCY 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: POLS 2100 and either HIST 1 100 or POLS 1 100 

Roles of the president as head of government and head of state. Emphasis on constitutional 
powers, separation of powers, checks and balances, political leadership styles, election politics 
and media, and the function of executive power in democratic societies. 

POLS 4120 CONGRESS AND POLITICAL PARTIES 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: POLS 2100 and either HIST 1 100 or POLS 1 100 

Party organization, the electoral system, structure and functions of Congress. Theories of 

representative government, and the role of Congress as policy maker. 

POLS 4150 AMERICAN SUPREME COURT 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: POLS 2100 and either HIST 1 100 or POLS 1 100 

Structure and functions of the Supreme Court, its use of legal reasoning, and role as policy maker. 



246 ARMSTRONG ATLANTIC STATE UNIVERSITY 



POLS 4180 ADMINISTRATIVE LAW 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: POLS 2100 and either PUBL 2601 or POLS 2601 

The framework of law governing federal administrative agencies. Emphasis on judicial respon- 
sibility, enforcement, discretion, summary actions, hearings, procedural safeguards, search and 
seizure, due process, and civil rights. Crosslisted as PUBL 4180. 

POLS 4200 INDEPENDENT STUDY IN INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS V-V-(l-3) 

Prerequisite: permission of instructor or department 

Open to seniors. Individual research and reading in international relations under the supervision 
of a member of the faculty. Primary focus on wide reading, conferences with the advisor, and 
written reports. Open to students with a 3.0 average in political science and at least a 2.5 GPA 
overall. Apply to the department by mid-semester preceding the semester independent study is 
contemplated. Open to transient students only with permission of the department head. Must have 
at least 12 semester hours in political science at the 3000+ level. 

POLS 4290 AMERICAN FOREIGN POLICY 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: POLS 2100 and either HIST 1 100 or POLS 1 100 

Analysis of United States foreign policy and factors, both domestic and global, contributing to its 

formulation. 

POLS 4400 INDEPENDENT STUDY IN COMPARATIVE GOVERNMENT 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: permission of instructor or department 

Open to juniors or above. Individual research and reading in comparative government under the 
supervision of a member of the faculty. Primary focus on wide reading, conferences with the 
advisor and written reports. Open to students with a minimum of 90 semester hours, including 12 
semester hours in political science at the 3000 level or above; must have a 3.0 average in political 
science or a 2.5 overall GPA. Apply to department by the mid-semester preceding the semester 
independent study is contemplated. Open to transient students only with permission of the 
department head. 

POLS 4620, -30, -40 INTERNSHIP V-V-3 

Prerequisite: permission of instructor or department 

Open only to juniors or above. Field experience in government, public service or applied politics. 

Crosslisted as PUBL 4620, -30, -40. 

POLS 4950 SEMINAR IN POLITICAL SCIENCE 3-0-3 

Open to seniors. Selected political science topics. Oral and written presentations of student 
research, in conformity with departmental guidelines. 

POLS 5120U CONGRESS AND POLITICAL PARTIES 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: POLS 2100 and either HIST 1 100 or POLS 1 100 

Party organization, the electoral system, structure and functions of Congress. Theories of 

representative government. Role of Congress as policy-maker. 

POLS 5130U POLITICAL TERRORISM 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: CRJU 1010 and either HIST 1 100 or POLS 1 100 

International and domestic terrorism undertaken for political purposes in liberal states. Primary 
focus on state-sponsored international terrorism, American domestic revolutionary terrorism, and 
the dilemmas of counterterrorism in a democracy. Crosslisted as CRJU 5130U. 

POLS 5280U SEMINAR IN GLOBAL POLITICS 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: POLS 2290 and either HIST 1 100 or POLS 1 100 

Relations among nations with emphasis on structure of international power politics, causes of war 

and approaches to peace. Covers some of the pertinent global issues of the post-Cold War Era, e.g., 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 247 



nuclear proliferation, multinational corporations, environmental and health issues, and human 
right issues. 

POLS 5500U LAW AND LEGAL PROCESS 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: HIST 1 100 or POLS 2100 

Law as a dynamic societal institution. Sources and functions of both civil and criminal law and 
operation of the legal process viewed from the perspectives of jurisprudence, political science, and 
sociology. Crosslisted as CRJU 5500U. 

POLS 5520U COMPARATIVE JUDICIAL SYSTEMS 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: POLS 5500U or CRJU 5500U. 

Law enforcement and judicial procedure in political systems of Great Britain, France, Russia, and 

Japan. Crosslisted as CRJU 5520U. 

PSYC - Psychology 

PSYC 1101 GENERAL PSYCHOLOGY 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: eligibility for ENGL 1101 

Introduction to the vocabulary, concepts, and methods of the science of behavior and mental 

processes, surveying all areas of psychology. 

PSYC 1101H HONORS GENERAL PSYCHOLOGY 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: acceptance in honors program 

Course content similar to PSYC1101, but emphasis on psychology as a laboratory science. 
Students will conduct a variety of experiments and demonstrations and will write research reports 
on these topics. 

PSYC 2010 HUMAN GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: PSYC 1101 

Survey of lifespan development with focus on physical, emotional, cognitive, and social 
development. Understandings of growth and development applied to classroom teaching and 
learning. Not for psychology majors. 

PSYC 2200 INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGICAL RESEARCH 3-1-4 

Prerequisite: PSYC 1101 

An introduction to scientific methodology and its application to behavior analysis. Various 

techniques of data collection and the statistical analysis of such data emphasized. 

PSYC 2950 DEVELOPMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: PSYC 1101 

Origin and development of psychological processes from the lifespan perspective including the 

effects of genetic/maturational and socio-cultural/environmental factors. 

PSYC 3020 PSYCHOLOGICAL TESTING 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: PSYC 1101 

Individual and group tests in psychological, educational, and clinical settings. Focus on the 
theoretical and statistical principles that underlie psychological and educational measurement and 
standardized psychological instruments, and ethical issues in psychological testing. 

PSYC 3030 EXPERIMENTAL SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: PSYC 1101 

Behavior ofothers as determinants of the behavior of the individual, identif) ing factors that shape 

feelings, behavior, and thoughts in social situations. 



248 ARMSTRONG ATLANTIC STATE UNIVERSITY 



PSYC 3040 FUNDAMENTALS OF COUNSELING AND PSYCHOTHERAPY 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: PS YC 1101 

A survey of personality theories and the behavior changing techniques arising from them. 

Emphasis on learning theory and environmental influences. 

PSYC 3050 TOPICS IN DEVELOPMENT 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: PSYC 1101 

A survey of the fundamental issues, processes, and theories of the field of developmental 
psychology. Focus on relevant research and practical applications through adolescence. NOT a 
substitute for PSYC 2950 or PSYC 2010. 

PSYC 3070 PERCEPTION 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: PSYC 1101 

Experimental and theoretical analysis of the nature of perceptual processes. 

PSYC 3090 PHYSIOLOGICAL PSYCHOLOGY 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: PSYC 1101 and BIOL 1107 and BIOL 1108 

Structure and function of the nervous system and its relationship to behavior. 

PSYC 3100 PSYCHOLOGY OF HUMAN SEXUALITY 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: PSYC 1101 

An examination of the developmental, physiological, clinical, and social aspects of human 

sexuality. Emphaisis on the various components of human sexuality from a developmental 

perspective. 

PSYC 3110 THEORIES OF PERSONALITY 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: PSYC 1101 

Selected personality theories with emphasis on normal behavior with attention to both experimen- 
tal and clinical data. Determinants of personality structure and the development of personality 
from divergent points of view. 

PSYC 3120 MEASUREMENT 3-1-4 

Prerequisite: PSYC 1101 and PSYC 2200 

Examination of the theory of measurement, reliability and validity techniques, test construction, 

and statistical analysis. Student research project required. 

PSYC 3150 PSYCHOLOGY OF CONFLICT AND STRESS 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: PSYC 1101 

Interactions between physiological processes in the development and maintenance of stress 

related disorders. Emphasis on environmental factors and stress management techniques. 

PSYC 3160 CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGY 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: PSYC 1101 

Behavioral problems, treatment modes, and theories. 

PSYC 3190 ANIMAL BEHAVIOR 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: PSYC 1101 

Adaptations and behaviors with which living organisms cope with their environments using 

naturalistic observation and experimental methods. 

PSYC 3200 INDUSTRIAL/ORGANIZATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: PSYC 1101 

Applications of psychological principles to business and professional settings, including work 
motivation, goal setting, power politics, leadership, communication, and organization develop- 
ment. 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 249 



PSYC 3210 PSYCHOLOGY OF WORK BEHAVIOR 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: PSYC 1101 

Psychological analysis of issues related to the individual worker in industry and organization 

including employee selection, training strategies, performance evaluation, and job satisfaction. 

PSYC 3280 ABNORMAL PSYCHOLOGY 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: PSYC 1101 

Scientific and cultural bases of various conceptions of undesirable behavior, emphasizing 

application of principles derived from basic research. 

PSYC 3500 COGNITIVE PSYCHOLOGY 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: PSYC 1101 

Issues related to the various models of human information processing with an emphasis on 

perceptual and linguistic development, including principles and applications derived from basic 

research. 

PSYC 3750 PSYCHOLOGY OF AGING 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: PSYC 1101 

Analysis of the aging process as a physical and biosocial change. Important adaptive aspects with 

an emphasis on maintaining an optimal quality of life. 

PSYC 3950 RESEARCH IN THE SOCIAL AND BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES V-V-(l-3) 

Prerequisite: junior standing, permission of department head, and agreement by a faculty member 
to supervise the research. 

Uncompensated research to be assigned and directed by a faculty member of the appropriate 
discipline. Students will conduct research using methods appropriate for that discipline. Student 
research may include a literature search, field or laboratory observation and experimentation, data 
reduction and analysis, and written and/or oral presentation of results. The research experience 
will be evaluated by a rotating committee of the departmental faculty before the initiation of the 
project, and again upon completion of the work. Credit will vary depending on the work to be 
completed. Up to three (3) credit hours may be earned in any one discipline, for a maximum of 
six (6) credit hours. 

PSYC 4010, -20, -30 SPECIAL TOPICS IN PSYCHOLOGY 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: PSYC 1101 

Upper-level courses not otherwise offered in the psychology curriculum. Various substantive 
topics, theoretical issues and problems. Possibility to repeat with different topics. No more than 
two such courses counted in the minor. 

PSYC 4060 BEHAVIOR MODIFICATION 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: PSYC 1101 

Proven methods of generating behavioral change, their empirical foundations and their applica- 
tions in clinical, educational, and social settings. 

PSYC 4080 LEARNING AND MOTIVATION 3-1-4 

Prerequisite: PSYC 1 101 and PSYC 2200 

Methodology and theory associated with the various forms of learning and their motivational 
concomitant. Laboratory introduction to animal care, training, and experimentation. Student 
research project required. 

PSYC 4100 HISTORY AND SYSTEMS OF PSYCHOLOGY 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: permission of instructor or department 

Open only to psychology majors. Basic ideas in psychology from early animism to modern 
behavioristics. Special attention is given to the philosophical basis at various times in the history 
of psychology. 



250 ARMSTRONG ATLANTIC STATE UNIVERSITY 



PSYC 4110 SENIOR SEMINAR 1-0-1 

Prerequisite: permission of instructor or department 

Open only to psychology majors. Reading and discussion group concentrating on selected 

contemporary issues in psychology, ethics, and careers. 

PSYC 4120 SENIOR PROJECT 3-0-3 

Open only to seniors. Project with a faculty member qualified in the student's area of interest to 
begin in the first semester of the senior year (register for the semester of expected completion). 
Scholarly paper acceptable to the departmental faculty required. 

PSYC 4130 SENIOR INTERNSHIP 3-0-3 

Open only to seniors. Individually designed work experience in an applied setting with the 
sponsoring organization providing a qualified supervisor. Faculty advisor will establish perfor- 
mance criteria and evaluate accordingly. Scholarly paper acceptable to the departmental faculty 
required. 

PUBL - Public Administration 

PUBL 2150 CAREERS IN POLITICAL SCIENCE AND PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION 1-0-1 

Prerequisite: POLS 2100 and either PUBL 2601 or POLS 2601 

How to apply the political science and public administration disciplines to careers in public 
service. Emphasis on creating a plan for professional development, a personality profile, skills 
assessment, researching career clusters in public service, field interviews, developing a plan for 
a job search. Crosslisted as POLS 2150. 

PUBL 2250 INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS 2-0-2 

Prerequisite: eligibility for ENGL 1 101 

Origin, principles, and functions of regional and global organizations transcending national 
boundaries. Organizational structures with emphasis on geopolitics creating structures, their 
functions, and dysfunctions. Crosslisted as POLS 2250. 

PUBL 2601 FOUNDATIONS OF PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: eligibility for ENGL 1 101 and either POLS 1 100 or POLS 2100 
Elements of public administration. Emphasis on bureaucracy, administrative power, informal 
groups, issue networks, budgeting, implementation, decision making, personnel, and ethics in 
public service. Crosslisted as POLS 2601. 

PUBL 3990 SPECIAL TOPICS IN PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION/POLITICAL 
SCIENCE 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: permission of instructor or department and POLS 2100 and either PUBL 2601 or 
POLS 2601 

Topics and issues not available in other courses. Topics will be announced before each offering 
of the course. Crosslisted as POLS 3990. 

PUBL 4010 POLITICS OF BUDGETARY PROCESS 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: POLS 2100 and either PUBL 2601 or POLS 2601 

Procedures and strategies for national, state and local government budgets. Emphasis on politics, 
fiscal and monetary policy, revenue systems, audits, planning, and accounting systems. Crosslisted 
as POLS 4010. 

PUBL 4030 PUBLIC POLICY DEVELOPMENT 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: POLS 2100 and either PUBL 2601 or POLS 2601 

Decision making for public policy. Emphasis on decision making theories, politics of the policy 
making process, mobilization of political support, cost and benefits of selected public policies, and 
application of decision theory to selected public policy issues. Crosslisted as POLS 4030. 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 251 



PUBL 4050 PRINCIPLES OF PUBLIC MANAGEMENT 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: POLS 2100 and either PUBL 2601 or POLS 2601 

Theory and cases on the management of public and non-profit agencies. Emphasis on total quality 

management, rational and incremental decision making, cost benefit analysis, politics and public 

policy of decision making, accountability measures, and political culture. Crosslisted as POLS 

4050. 

PUBL 4180 ADMINISTRATIVE LAW 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: POLS 2100 and either PUBL 2601 or POLS 2601 

The framework of law governing federal administrative agencies. Emphasis on judicial respon- 
sibility, enforcement, discretion, summary actions, hearings, procedural safeguards, search and 
seizure, due process, and civil rights. Crosslisted as POLS 4180. 

PUBL 4620, -30, -40 INTERNSHIP V-V-3 

Prerequisite: permission of instructor or department 

Open only to juniors or above. Field experience in government, public service or applied politics. 

Crosslisted as POLS 4620, -30, -40. 

RADS - Radiologic Sciences 

RADS 3000 INTRODUCTION TO RADIOLOGIC SCIENCES 3-1-3 

Open only to majors in radiologic technologies-BS. Professional organizations, specialties, 
accreditation, certification, licensure, professional development, ethics legal issues, radiation 
protection methodology, and elementary imaging concepts. 

RADS 3050 PATIENT CARE AND INTERACTION 3-2-3 

Open only to majors in radiologic technologies-BS. Physical and psychological needs of the 
family and patient, patient transfer techniques, interaction with the terminally ill, vital signs, 
administration of injections and pharmaceuticals, IV and tube maintenance, urinary catheteriza- 
tion, administration and interpretation of EKG's, emergency medical situations, infectious 
disease processes and universal precautions. CPR certification required. 

RADS 3060 PRINCIPLES OF IMAGE FORMATION AND EVALUATION 2-2-3 

Open only to majors in radiologic technologies-BS. Factors influencing radiographic quality and 
conditions influencing exposures, technique charts and artifact analysis. 

RADS 3071 RADIOGRAPHIC PROCEDURES I 2-3-3 

Open only to majors in radiologic technologies-BS. Procedures involving the chest, abdomen, and 
visceral organs requiring the use of contrast media, including spatial relationships and pathology. 
Emphasis on equipment manipulation and quality evaluation of radiographic examinations. 

RADS 3072 RADIOGRAPHIC PROCEDURES II 2-3-3 

Prerequisite: RADS 3071 

Procedures involving extremities, shoulder girdle, and vertebral column including chest and 
abdomen, visceral organs requiring the use of contrast media, spatial relationships, pathology, 
equipment manipulation, quality evaluation and medical terminology. 

RADS 3073 RADIOGRAPHIC PROCEDURES HI 2-3-3 

Prerequisite: RADS 3072 

Procedures involving bony thorax, pelvic girdle, facial bones, cranium, heart, breast, and 
reproductive organs Including the chest, abdomen, and visceral organs requiring the use of 
contrast media, including spatial relationships and pathology. Emphasis on equipment manipu- 
lation and quality evaluation of radiographic examinations. 



252 ARMSTRONG ATLANTIC STATE UNIVERSITY 



RADS 3090 INTRODUCTION TO RADIATION PHYSICS 2-2-3 

Prerequisite: MATH 1111 

Mechanics, electromagnetic physics and nuclear physics as they relate to the medical setting. 

RADS 3150 RADIOBIOLOGY AND RADIATION PROTECTION 3-1-3 

Prerequisite: permission of instructor or department 

Biological, chemical, and physical effects of radiation. Emphasis on radiation measurement and 
exposure reduction to minimize somatic and genetic effects. Performance of radiation surveys and 
radiobiologic research. 

RADS 3161 CLINICAL EDUCATION I 0-8-1 

Prerequisite: permission of instructor or department 

Prerequisite or corequisite: RADS 3050 and RADS 3060 and RADS 3071 

Supervised clinical practice in performing radiographic procedures. 

RADS 3162 CLINICAL EDUCATION II 0-16-2 

Prerequisite: permission of instructor or department 
Prerequisite or corequisite: RADS 3072 and RADS 3161 
Supervised clinical practice in performing radiographic procedures. 

RADS 3180 FOUNDATIONS OF RADIATION THERAPY 0-16-2 

Prerequisite: acceptance into a radiologic science program and registry in a radiologic science 
discipline 

Radiation therapy department organization, radiation therapy techniques, introduction to clinical 
radiation oncology, radiation therapy terminology, auxiliary radiation therapy equipment, radia- 
tion therapy nursing, the lymph system, landmarks, radiation biology and protection in radiation 
therapy, radiation therapy math basics, simulation imaging, radiation therapy computers. 

RADS 3190 PRINCIPLES OF RADIATION THERAPY 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: permission of instructor or department and RADS 3000 

Principles of cancer treatment modalities and rationale for treatment choice with an emphasis on 
radiation therapy. Focus on the pathologic mechanisms of tumor development, tumor classifica- 
tion and staging. 

RADS 3301 CLINICAL EDUCATION I 0-8-1 

Prerequisite: permission of instructor or department 

A supervised orientation to radiographic procedures and radiation therapy students. 

RADS 3302 CLINICAL EDUCATION II 0-16-2 

Prerequisite: permission of instructor or department and RADS 3301 

A supervised clinical experience in the application and delivery of radiation therapy. 

RADS 4050 QUALITY MANAGEMENT IN RADIOGRAPHY 2-2-2 

Prerequisite: permission of instructor or department 

Equipment testing, analysis of quality control data and quality assurance data, federal government 
guidelines and introduction to total quality management concepts and procedures. 

RADS 4090 RADIOGRAPHIC PHYSICS 2-2-3 

Prerequisite: RADS 3090 

Interaction of radiation with matter, formation of photographic and electronic images, and the 
physics of nuclear magnetic image and computed tomography. 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 253 



RADS 4110 ADVANCED IMAGING 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: permission of instructor or department and RADS 4090 

Instrumentation, operation, and clinical uses of computerized tomography, magnetic resonance 

imaging, cardiovascular/inventional radiology, mammography. 

RADS 4163 CLINICAL EDUCATION III 0-24-3 

Prerequisite: permission of instructor or department and RADS 3162 
Supervised clinical practice in performing radiographic procedures. 

RADS 4164 CLINICAL EDUCATION IV 0-27-3 

Prerequisite: permission of instructor or department and RADS 4163 
Supervised clinical practice in performing radiographic procedures. 

RADS 4165 CLINICAL EDUCATION V 0-32-7 

Prerequisite: permission of instructor or department 

Supervised clinical practice in radiographic procedures in computerized tomography, magnetic 
resonance imaging, cardiovascular/interventional radiology, and mammography. 

RADS 4201 RADIATION ONCOLOGY I 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: permission of instructor or department 

Prerequisite or corequisite: RADS 3190 

Etiology, epidemiology, treatment, and prognosis of carcinomas affecting the head and neck, 

respiratory, digestive, and central nervous systems. 

RADS 4202 RADIATION ONCOLOGY II 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: RADS 4201 

Etiology, epidemiology, treatment, and prognosis of malignancies affecting the urinary, integu- 
mentary, and reproductive systems including lymphomas and leukemias. 

RADS 4240 RADIATION THERAPY PHYSICS 3-1-3 

Prerequisite: permission of instructor or department and RADS 3090 

Operating principles of therapeutic equipment, methods of baseline testing and calibration, 

domestic and brachytherapy. 

RADS 4260 TREATMENT PLANNING 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: permission of instructor or department 

Prerequisite or corequisite: RADS 4240 

Planning and calculation of dosage for a range of cancer treatment techniques with and without 

computer assistance. 

RADS 4280 QUALITY MANAGEMENT IN RADIATION THERAPY 1-0-1 

Prerequisite: permission of instructor or department, RADS 4240 

Total quality management concepts and principles in a radiation oncology department. Emphasis 

on quality assurance and JCAHO standards. 

RADS 4303 CLINICAL EDUCATION III 0-24-4 

Prerequisite: permission of instructor or department and RADS 3302 

Supervised clinical experience in the application and delivery of radiation therapy. 

RADS 4304 CLINICAL EDUCATION IV 0-24-3 

Prerequisite: permission of instructor or department and RADS 4303 

Supervised clinical experience in the application and delivery of radiation therapy. 



254 ARMSTRONG ATLANTIC STATE UNIVERSITY 



RADS 4305 CLINICAL EDUCATION V 0-24-4 

Prerequisite: permission of instructor or department and RADS 4304 

Capstone clinical education course in the application and delivery of radiation therapy. 

RADS 4410 CROSS-SECTIONAL ANATOMY 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: permission of instructor or department 

Three-dimensional anatomical relationships of cross-sectional anatomy slices and images pro- 
duced by computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. 

RADS 4430 PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE SEMINAR 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: permission of instructor or department 

Capstone course on major trends and issues affecting present day radiologic sciences. 

RADS 4450 RADIOLOGY MANAGEMENT AND LEADERSHIP 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: permission of instructor or department 

Management, leadership, health care financing, and total quality concepts specific to the radiation 

sciences. 

READ - Reading 

READ 0090 READING THE BIOGRAPHY 2-0-2 

Use of biographical material with emphasis on literature, the media, and development of receptive 
language skills. Focus on literal and critical thinking strategies with guided reading assignments, 
reader response journals, library research projects, use of electronic resources, summaries, and 
autobiographies. 

READ 0091 LITERACY, ALTERNATIVE VIEWPOINTS, AND PROPAGANDA 2-0-2 

Use of the highly pervasive discourse of propaganda, alternate positions, with support for and 
against diverse viewpoints using multiple genres including politics, advertising, multicultural 
writings, speeches, editorials and essays. Acquisition of an intellectual framework and sophisti- 
cated level of thinking. 

READ 0099 STRATEGIES FOR COLLEGE READING 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: placement according to CPE score 

Reinforcement of basic college reading strategies. Emphasis on comprehension, critical thinking, 
vocabulary, main ideas, supportive details, organizational and rhetorical patterns, transitions, 
tone, purpose, fact and opinion, and inferences. 

READ 0099L STRATEGIES FOR COLLEGE READING WITH COMPUTER 
APPLICATIONS 4-1-4 

Prerequisite: placement according to CPE score 

Reinforcement of basic college reading strategies. Emphasis on comprehension, critical thinking, 
vocabulary, main ideas, supportive details, organizational and rhetorical patterns, transitions, 
tone, purpose, fact and opinion, and inferences, with focus on a computer laboratory component. 

READ 0099T THEMATIC APPROACHES TO COLLEGE READING 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: placement according to CPE score 

Corequisite: ENGL 0099T 

A thematic approach to text selections and short stories or articles on a wide range of subjects with 

emphasis on comprehension, critical thinking, increased vocabulary, recognition of main ideas, 

supportive details, organizational and rhetorical patterns, transitions, tone, purpose, fact and 

opinion, and inferences. 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 255 



RESP - Respiratory Therapy 

RESP 3110 PATIENT ASSESSMENT 3-0-3 

Corequisite: RESP 3120 and RESP 315 1C 

Open only to majors in respiratory therapy-BS. A problem solving approach to evaluation and 
treatment of patients with cardiopulmonary disease. History-taking, physical examination, 
radiographs, ECG, lab tests, spirometry, and blood gas analysis. 

RESP 3120 RESPIRATORY CARE EQUIPMENT 2-2-3 

Corequisite: RESP 3110 and RESP 3151C 

Open only to majors in respiratory therapy-BS. Theory of operation, application, and evaluation 
of equipment used in respiratory care. Lab emphasis on selection, trouble shooting, quality 
control, and asepsis. 

RESP 3151C CLINICAL PRACTICUM I 0-6-1 

Corequisite: RESP 31 10 and RESP 3120 

Open only to majors in respiratory therapy-BS. Preclinical skills development, orientation to the 

hospital environment, and introduction to electronic information systems. 

RESP 3210 CLINICAL PHARMACOLOGY 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: RESP 3110 and RESP 3120 and RESP 3151 C 
Corequisite: RESP 3220 and RESP 3230 and RESP 3252C 

Principles of pharmacology including pharmacokinetics, dynamics, drug interactions, and toxi- 
cology emphasizing drug groups used in treatment of cardiopulmonary disease. 

RESP 3220 RESPIRATORY CARE FUNDAMENTALS 2-2-3 

Prerequisite: RESP 3110 and RESP 3120 and RESP 3151C 

Corequisite: RESP 3210 and RESP 3230 and RESP 3252C 

Development and implementation of the care plan; evaluation of patient response to therapy with 

extensive use of therapeutic protocols and decision making algorithms. 

RESP 3230 DIAGNOSTIC PROCEDURES 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: RESP 31 10 and RESP 3120 and RESP 315 1C 

Corequisite: RESP 3210 and RESP 3220 and RESP 3252C 

A problem solving approach to evaluation and diagnosis of cardiopulmonary disease with 

emphasis on procedural protocols, analysis of results, and application to the care plan. 

RESP 3252C CLINICAL PRACTICUM II 0-18-3 

Prerequisite: RESP 3110 and RESP 3120 and RESP 3151C 

Corequisite: RESP 3210 and RESP 3220 and RESP 3230 

Application of therapeutic protocols, assessment of patient response to therapy, and modifications 

of the care plan based on patient response outside of the critical care environment. 

RESP 3310 BASIC VENTILATORY SUPPORT 2-3-3 

Prerequisite: RESP 3210 and RESP 3220 and RESP 3230 and RESP 3252C 

Corequisite: RESP 3353C 

The history, terminology, fundamental principles, and concept of life support technology. Lab 

experience emphasizes ventilator classification, evaluation, and management. 

RESP 3320 SUBACUTE/HOME CARE 2-0-2 

Prerequisite: RESP 3210 and RESP 3220 and RESP 3230 and RESP 3252C 

Corequisite: REST 3310 and RESP 3353C 

Assessment and care of the patient in the subacute and home settings. Case management. 

discharge planning, rehabilitation, durable medical equipment, regulatory issues, and patient 

education explored. Role of the RCP in community health and wellness examined. 



256 ARMSTRONG ATLANTIC STATE UNIVERSITY 



RESP 3353C CLINICAL PRACTICUM III 0-18-3 

Prerequisite: RESP 3252C 

Corequisite: RESP 3310 

Care of the ventilator-dependent patient in the critical care environment. Patient assessment, 

airway care, trend monitoring, calibration, and set up of life support systems. CAI used to develop 

critical thinking skills. 

RESP 4110 ADVANCED VENTILATORY SUPPORT 2-3-3 

Prerequisite: RESP 3310 and RESP 3353C 

Corequisite: RESP 4120 and RESP 4130 and RESP 4154C 

Case-oriented approach to management of the ventilator dependant patient. Patient assessment 

and modification of the care plan based on patient response. 

RESP 4120 CARDIOPULMONARY CRITICAL CARE 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: RESP 3310 and RESP 3353C 

Corequisite: RESP 4110 and RESP 4130 and RESP 4154C 

Hemodynamic monitoring, fluid/electrolyte management, cardiovascular pharmacology, and 

ACLS protocols. 

RESP 4130 PERINATAL CARE 3-3-4 

Prerequisite: RESP 3310 and RESP 3353C 

Corequisite: RESP 41 10 and RESP 4120 and RESP 4154C 

Care of the pediatric and neonatal patient in the critical care environment. Patient assessment, 

initiation and modification of the care plan based on patient response. 

RESP 4154C CLINICAL PRACTICUM IV 0-18-3 

Prerequisite: RESP 3310 and RESP 3353C 

Corequisite: RESP 4110 and RESP 4120 and RESP 4130 

Advanced monitoring of the CP and CV system in the adult ICU environment. Home/subacute 

care rotation will emphasize core of the chronically ill patient. Introduction to the role of the RCP 

in pediatric/neonatal ICU. 

RESP 4210 CARDIOPULMONARY MEDICINE 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: RESP 41 10 and RESP 4120 and RESP 4130 and RESP 4154C and RESP 4160C 
Corequisite: RESP 4255C 

A problem solving approach to the pathophysiology and medical management of cardiopulmo- 
nary problems encountered in the hospital setting. 

RESP 4220 RESEARCH IN RESPIRATORY CARE 2-3-3 

Prerequisite: HLPR 2000 and MATH 2200 

Survey of research designs, methods, and evaluation techniques applicable to clinical research in 
the major field. Research proposal and poster presentation required. Participation in a clinical 
study and IRB review process required. 

RESP 4230 SEMINAR IN RESPIRATORY CARE 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: RESP 41 10 and RESP 4120 and RESP 4130 and RESP 4154C and RESP 4160C 
Corequisite: RESP 4210 and RESP 4220 and RESP 4240 and RESP 4255C 
Capstone course to prepare for professional transition. Ethics, professional behavior, medical and 
legal issues, and cultural trends in health care. Students must pass three standardized exit exams 
to earn a passing grade in the course. 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 257 



RESP 4255C CLINICAL PRACTICUM V 0-18-3 

Prerequisite: RESP 41 10 and RESP 4120 and RESP 4130 and RESP 4154C and RESP 4160C 
Corequisite: RESP 4210 and RESP 4220 and RESP 4230 and RESP 4240 
Capstone clinical experience to facilitate transition to RCP. Students will complete advanced 
rotations in cardiovascular, perinatal, and adult critical care. Students must pass a comprehensive, 
summative evaluation to earn a passing grade. 

RGTR - Regents' Remediation 

RGTR 0198 REGENTS' READING PREPARATION 3-0-3 

Regents' Reading Test preparation, required following an unsuccessful attempt to pass the 
Regents' Test in reading. Review of strategies for improving vocabulary development, especially 
contextual, and for increasing reading comprehension corresponding to areas on the Regents' 
Reading Test-literal, inferential, and analytical. Emphasis on test-taking techniques and practice. 

RGTR 0199 COMPOSITION REVIEW 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: ENGL 1101 and ENGL 1102 

Preparation of students for success on essay portion of Regents' examination through intensive 

writing of essays. 

SCIE - Science 

SCIE 1000 INTRODUCTION TO SCIENTIFIC INQUIRY 3-0-3 

Examination of the methods of science. Traces the evolution of scientific thought from the 
perspectives of physics, chemistry and biology. Focuses on major concepts in the natural sciences 
through a quantitative approach. 

SLPA - Speech/Language Pathology 

SLPA 1220 INTRODUCTION TO COMMUNICATION DISORDERS 3-0-3 

Types, characteristics, etiologies, and treatment methodologies of various communication disor- 
ders in children and adults. 

SLPA 2230 ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY OF SPEECH AND HEARING 
MECHANISMS 3-0-3 

Anatomy and physiology of areas of respiration, phonation, articulation, cerebration/nervous 
system and audition; functional correlates to the communication process. Field experiences 
required. 

SLPA 2250 PHONETICS 3-0-3 

International phonetic alphabet(IPA) in speech-language pathology. IPA transcription of con- 
nected speech (normal and disordered), important characteristics of regional/cultural dialects. 

SLPA 3150 NORMAL SPEECH AND LANGUAGE DEVELOPMENT 3-1-3 

Open only to speech-language pathology majors. Phonological, morphological, semantic, syntac- 
tic, and pragmatic growth. Observation practicum required. 

SLPA 3410 INTRODUCTION TO AUDIOLOGY 3-1-3 

Open only to speech-language pathology majors. Introduction to etiology, characteristics, 
assessment, and rehabilitation of individuals with hearing impairments. Directed observation. 

SLPA 3420 LANGUAGE DISORDERS 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: SLPA 3150 

Etiology, characteristics, classification, assessment, and treatment of language disorders. Field 

experiences required. 



258 ARMSTRONG ATLANTIC STATE UNIVERSITY 



SLPA 3430 ORGANICALLY-BASED COMMUNICATION DISORDERS 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: SLPA 3150 

Etiology, characteristics, assessment, and treatment of the disorders of voice, cleft palate, and 

cerebral palsy. Field experiences required. 

SLPA 3450 ARTICULATION DISORDERS 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: SLPA 3150 

Etiology, characteristics, classification, assessment, and treatment of articulation and phonologi- 
cal disorders. Field experiences required. 

SLPA 4140 NON-VERBAL COMMUNICATION 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: SLPA 3150 

Basic knowledge and usage of various non-verbal communication systems. 

SLPA 4170 INTRODUCTION TO DIAGNOSTIC PROCEDURES IN 
SPEECH-LANGUAGE PATHOLOGY 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: SLPA 3450 and SLPA 3420 and SLPA 3430 

Corequisite: SLPA 4180 and SLPA 4190 

Assessment principles and practices in speech-language pathology. 

SLPA 4180 DIRECTED OBSERVATIONS IN SPEECH-LANGUAGE 

PATHOLOGY 1-3-3 

Prerequisite: SLPA 3450 and SLPA 3420 and SLPA 3430 

Corequisite: SLPA 4170 andSLPA 4190 

Focused observations of current practices in speech-language pathology. 

SLPA 4190 CLINICAL METHODS IN SPEECH-LANGUAGE PATHOLOGY 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: SLPA 3450 and SLPA 3420 and SLPA 3430 

Corequisite: SLPA 4170 and SLPA 4180 

Introduction to organization, scope, and requirements of clinical practicum. 

SLPA 4210 SENIOR SEMINAR 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: permission of instructor 

Corequisite: SLPA 4450 

Contemporary issues, principles, and practices specific to speech-language pathology. 

SLPA 4350 SPEECH SCIENCE 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: permission of instructor 

Physiological production, acoustics, physics of speech, analysis of speech, and technology- 
related instrumentation available to assess the parameters of speech production. 

SLPA 4450 PRACTICUM IN SPEECH-LANGUAGE PATHOLOGY 0-3-3 

Prerequisite: SLPA 4170 and SLPA 4180 and SLPA 4190 
Supervised clinical experience in speech-language pathology. 

SLPA 4500 INTRODUCTION TO RESEARCH IN SPEECH-LANGUAGE 
PATHOLOGY 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: permission of instructor 

Introduction to scientific methodology and its application to the field of communication disorders. 

SOCI - Sociology 

SOCI 1101 INTRODUCTORY SOCIOLOGY 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: eligibility for ENGL1 101 

Introduction to the concepts and methods of the science of human group behavior including the 

study of socialization, culture, race, ethnicity, gender, age, and social institutions. 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 259 



SOCI 3130 HATE CRIMES AND ORDERED LIBERTY 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: HIST 1 100 or POLS 1 100 

Racial, ethnic, cultural, and religious strife and the tension between freedom and equality in 
democratic societies. Focus on the governmental definition of hate crimes and the historical, 
economic, and political roots of such crimes. Crosslisted as CRJU 3130. 

SOCI 3150 FAMILY AND ALTERNATIVE LIFESTYLES 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: SOCI 1101 

Institutions having major responsibility for socializing members of society including various 

forms and types of families. 

SOCI 3200 RACIAL AND ETHNIC MINORITIES 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: SOCI 1101 

Historical and/or contemporary realities of various racial and ethnic minority groups in the U.S., 

including African-Americans, Latinos, Native Americans, and Asian-Americans. 

SOCI 3330 EXPLORING POPULAR CULTURE 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: SOCI 1101 

Examination of popular culture using mass media, technology, and language to explore a given 
era. Comparisons of lifestyles, gender roles, attitudes towards various groups, and the national and 
regional mood of the times. 

SOCI 3400 METHODS OF SOCIAL RESEARCH 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: SOCI 1 101 

Methods of applied social research including case studies, record research, experimental designs, 

surveys, observation, and systems interactions in relation to social data. 

SOCI 3500 SOCIAL PROBLEMS 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: SOCI 1101 

Examination of contemporary social problems such as deviance, crime, inequality, ageism, 

sexism, and institutional crisis in the context of sociological theory. 

SOCI 3510 FAMILY VIOLENCE 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: CRJU 1010 or SOCI 1 101 or permission of the instructor 

Study of the family as an institution that may produce violent individuals. Correlates of family 
violence, theoretical explanations, impact on public policy, effects on victims and society. 
Crosslisted with CRJU 3510. 

SOCI 3950 RESEARCH IN THE SOCIAL AND 

BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES V-V-U-5) 

Prerequisite: permission of instructor or department head 

Open only to juniors or above. Uncompensated research assigned by a faculty member using 
methods appropriate to the discipline. Evaluation by a rotating committee of the faculty before 
initiation and upon completion. Up to five (5) credit hours in one discipline, for a maximum often 
(10) credit hours. 

SOCI 4010, -20, -30 SPECIAL TOPICS IN SOCIOLOGY 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: SOCI 1101 

Upper-level courses not otherwise offered in the sociology curriculum. Various substantive 
topics, theoretical issues and problems. Possibility to repeat with different topics. No more than 
two such courses counted in the minor. 



260 ARMSTRONG ATLANTIC STATE UNIVERSITY 



SOCI 4300 ALCOHOL AND DRUG STUDIES 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: SOCI 1101 

Examination of the various forms of alcohol and drug abuse with emphasis on the stages of 
harmful dependence and addiction, including legal and social implications along with treatment 
and rehabilitation. 

SOCI 4500 INDEPENDENT STUDY 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: SOCI 1101 

By invitation of the professor. Open to transient students only by permission of the dean of Arts 

and Sciences at Armstrong Atlantic and the student's home institution. 

SPAN - Spanish 

SPAN 1050 SPANISH FOR HEALTH CARE SYSTEMS 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: eligibility for ENGL 1101 

Communications skills to deal with Spanish-speaking patients in a wide variety of clinical 

situations. 

SPAN 1001 ELEMENTARY SPANISH I 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: eligibility for ENGL 1101 

Spanish grammar, pronunciation, and oral comprehension. Introduction to the culture and 

civilization of the Spanish speaking world. 

SPAN 1002 ELEMENTARY SPANISH II 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: eligibility for ENGL 1 101 and SPAN 1001 

Spanish grammar, pronunciation, and oral comprehension. Introduction to the culture and 

civilization of the Spanish speaking world. 

SPAN 2001 INTERMEDIATE SPANISH 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: eligibility for ENGL 1 101 and SPAN 1002 

Continued development of reading, writing, listening, and speaking skills. 

SPAN 2002 INTERMEDIATE SPANISH II 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: eligibility for ENGL 1 101 and SPAN 2001 

Continued development of reading, writing, listening, and speaking skills. 

SPAN 3031 SPANISH CONVERSATION AND COMPOSITION I 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: SPAN 2002 

Conversational Spanish to develop greater oral proficiency and awareness of Hispanic culture. 

Review of grammar and syntax through guided essays. 

SPAN 3032 SPANISH CONVERSATION AND COMPOSITION II 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: SPAN 3031 
Continuation of Spanish 3031. 

SPAN 3050 ADVANCED GRAMMAR AND SYNTAX 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: SPAN 2002 

Advanced grammar and syntax, exercises, essays, and translations. 

SPAN 3060 ADVANCED GRAMMAR AND SYNTAX FOR 

NATIVE SPEAKERS 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: permission of instructor or department 
Grammar and syntax for native speakers. 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 261 



SPAN 3111 CIVILIZATION AND CULTURE OF SPAIN 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: SPAN 2001 

Historical survey from the pre-Roman era to the present. 

SPAN 3120 CIVILIZATION AND CULTURE OF LATIN AMERICA 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: SPAN 2002 

Historical survey from the pre-Columbian era to the present. 

SPAN 3200 INTRODUCTION TO LITERATURE 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: SPAN 3031 

Analysis of Hispanic poetry, prose, and drama. 

SPAN 3210 SURVEY OF SPANISH PENINSULAR LITERATURE I 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: SPAN 3031 and SPAN 3050 and SPAN 3200 

Analytical methods and approaches to the literary tradition in Spain from the jarchas to the 

Illustration, while including medieval and golden age literature. 

SPAN 3220 SURVEY OF SPANISH PENINSULAR LITERATURE II 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: SPAN 3031 and SPAN 3050 and SPAN 3200 

Analytical methods and approaches to the literary tradition in Spain from the Illustration to the 

present. Focus on romanticism, the generation of 1898, the generation of 1927, and post-civil war 

literature. 

SPAN 3230 SURVEY OF SPANISH AMERICAN LITERATURE I 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: SPAN 3031 and SPAN 3050 and SPAN 3200 

Analytical methods and approaches to the literary tradition in Spanish America through represen- 
tative samples of indigenous works, Chronicles of the Indes, the baroque, romanticism, and 
modernism. 

SPAN 3240 SURVEY OF SPANISH AMERICAN LITERATURE II 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: SPAN 3031 and SPAN 3050 and SPAN 3200 

Analytical methods and approaches to the literary tradition in Spanish America through represen- 
tative works of the Mexican revolution, Telluric novels, pre-boom, boom, and post-boom. 

SPAN 3510, -20 STUDY ABROAD 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: SPAN 1002 

A term of study in conjunction with the University System of Georgia. Intensive instruction 

complemented by excursions. Must have a 3.0 minimum GPA in all previous Spanish course 

work. 

SPAN 4010 SPECIAL GENRE 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: SPAN 3200 

Hispanic literature: subject announced when course offered. 

SPAN 4020 SPECIAL AUTHOR 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: SPAN 3200 

Hispanic literature: subject announced when course offered. 

SPAN 4030 SPECIAL TOPICS 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: SPAN 3200 

Hispanic literature: subject announced when course offered. Thematic studies such as the 

picaresque and the anti-hero. 



262 ARMSTRONG ATLANTIC STATE UNIVERSITY 



SPAN 4040 SPANISH PHONETICS 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: SPAN 2002 
Spanish phonological system. 

SPAN 4060 CONTEMPORARY SPANISH AMERICAN NOVEL 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: SPAN 3200 

Analytical methods and approaches toward understanding the twentieth-century novel and its 
impact on world literature. Discussion of magical realism, marvelous realism, the testimonial 
novel, and the novel of the director. 

SPAN 4070 CONTEMPORARY SPANISH PENINSULAR NOVEL 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: SPAN 3200 

Analytical methods and approaches toward understanding the novel and its impact on world 
literature. Discussion of realism, naturalism, the generation of 1898, and the effects of Franco's 
dictatorship on contemporary literature. 

SPAN 4080 SPANISH PENINSULAR THEATRE 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: SPAN 3200 

Analytical methods and approaches toward understanding the development of a national drama 
from the auto de fe, the golden age honor plays, Romanticism and don Juanismo, the esperpento, 
as well as works confronting Franco's dictatorship. 

SPAN 4090 SPANISH AMERICAN THEATRE 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: SPAN 3200 

Analytical methods and approaches toward understanding the development of drama ranging 
from imitative models that upheld authority through that of social protest and revolution to bring 
about change throughout Spanish America. 

SPAN 4100 SPANISH PENINSULAR POETRY 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: SPAN 3200 

Analytical methods and approaches toward understanding Spanish poetry including the jarchas, 

the medieval epic, la cuaderna via, the golden age, the romancero, etc. 

SPAN 4110 SPANISH AMERICAN POETRY 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: SPAN 3200 

Analytical methods and approaches toward understanding Spanish American poetry including the 

baroque, neo-classical, romanticism, modernism, the avant-garde, and contemporary trends. 

SPAN 4900 INDEPENDENT STUDY 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: permission of instructor or department and SPAN 2002 

Open to transient students only with permission of the dean of faculty at Armstrong Atlantic and 

the student's home college. 

SPAN 4990 LANGUAGE INTERNSHIP V-V-(l-3) 

Prerequisite: permission of instructor or department 

Open to juniors or above. Individually designed project involving off-campus instruction at the 
school level (grades 1-6). Three preparation hours for each hour of classroom instruction. 
Supervision by sponsoring institution and Spanish faculty member and coordinated by intern, 
faculty member, and classroom teacher. Student must have earned a 2.75 minimum overall GPA, 
a 3.0 GPA in Spanish, and have departmental internship committee recommendation. 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 263 



SSCI - Social Science 

SSCI 2960 FOREIGN LANGUAGE AND CULTURE V-V-(l-15) 

Prerequisite: permission of the dean of the College of Arts and Sciences 

Offered as part of a study abroad or global studies program. Instruction in language and/or culture 

of a foreign country or people. Crosslisted as HUMN 2960. 

THEA - Theatre 

THEA 1100 THEATRE APPRECIATION 3-0-3 

Survey and critical appreciation of theatre. 

THEA 1200 INTRODUCTION TO THEATRE 3-0-3 

Theatre from the Greeks to the present, exploring diverse historical and cultural movements 
manifested in, reflected in, and often shaped by the drama. 

THEA 2270 THEATER LAB 0-1-1 

Prerequisite: ENGL 1101 

Practical experience in the theatre. The student will work on or back stage during an approved 
Masquers' or departmental production. Only one hour of credit may be earned per term. The 
maximum total credit permitted is three semester hours. Offered each semester. 

THEA 2410 ORAL INTERPRETATION 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: eligibility for ENGL 1101 

Oral interpretation of poetry, prose and drama. Methods of literary analysis and vocal techniques 

needed to communicate an author's mood and meaning. 

THEA 3000 INTRODUCTION TO ACTING 3-0-3 

Basic acting which focuses on stage movement, fundamentals of voice and diction, improvisation, 
dramatic imagination, memory, and scene analysis. Performance of scenes and monologues from 
contemporary drama. 

THEA 3030 CREATIVE DRAMATICS AND CHILDREN'S THEATRE 3-0-3 

Exploration of the various elements which make up a dramatic event, such as improvisational- 
based acting and story telling, which can be used as a teaching device. 

THEA 3040 STAGECRAFT 3-0-3 

Systematic introduction to the fundamentals of scenic design, construction and rigging. The 
course relies heavily on hands-on instruction with the tools, techniques and materials used in 
mounting a stage production. 

THEA 3270 VIDEO LAB 0-1-1 

Prerequisite: ENGL 1102 

Practical experience in video production through work on approved projects under supervision of 
Armstrong Atlantic's video production coordinator. Only one hour of credit may be earned per 
semester. Repeatable up to three hours. Crosslisted as COMM 3270. 

THEA 3400 HISTORY OF FILM 3-0-3 

Prerequisite:ENGL 2100 or PHIL 2201 or PHIL 2251 

History and development of cinema from the silent period to the present time. Crosslisted as FILM 

3400. 



264 ARMSTRONG ATLANTIC STATE UNIVERSITY 



THEA 3420 ACTING 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: THEA 3000 or permission of instructor or department 

Characterization and styles of acting; historical, critical, practical, theoretical, and experimental 

perspectives. Emphasis on development of performance skills. 

THEA 3440 HISTORY OF THEATRE I 3-0-3 

Theatrical art from its beginnings through the Elizabethan period, emphasizing theatrical 
conventions of Greek, Roman medieval, and Elizabethan theatre. 

THEA 3450 HISTORY OF THEATRE II 3-0-3 

Theatrical art of the world, emphasizing theatrical conventions from the Restoration to the 
present. 

THEA 3460 PLAY DIRECTING 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: ENGL 1101 

Theory and practice of play directing, including preparing and executing short scenes and plays. 

THEA 3470 THEATRE MANAGEMENT 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: ENGL 1101 

Theory and practice in theatre management, including budget planning, box office, publicity, 

royalties, and other aspects of management. 

THEA 3490 TELEVISION THEORY AND CRITICISM 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: ENGL 2100 or PHIL 2201 or PHIL 2251 

Television theory and criticism with special emphasis on television as a media form. Crosslisted 

as FILM 3490. 

THEA 3500 INTRODUCTION TO FILM 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: ENGL 2100 or PHIL 2201 or PHIL 2251 

Emphasis on the critical appreciation of film as an art form. Crosslisted as FILM 3500 and JOUR 

3500. 

THEA 3510 FILM AND LITERATURE 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: ENGL 2100 or PHIL 2201 or PHIL 2251 

Relationship between film and literature with special emphasis on the adaptation of literature into 

film. Crosslisted as FILM 3510. 

THEA 4000 SPECIAL TOPICS IN THEATRE V-V-3 

Prerequisite: ENGL 1101 

Subject announced when course offered. Subjects vary, such as: classical acting styles, absurdist 

drama, stage combat, scenic painting. 

THEA 4470 STAGE MANAGERS AND DESIGNERS LAB 0-2-2 

Prerequisite: permission of instructor or department 

Practical experience in stage management, set, light or costume design. Course repeatable to a 

maximum of 6 credit hours. 

THEA 4500 DRAMA WORKSHOP 0-3-3 

Prerequisite: ENGL 1101 

Summer stock theatre: all aspects of production. 

THEA 4510 DRAMA WORKSHOP 0-3-3 

Prerequisite: ENGL 1101 

Summer stock theatre: all aspects of production. 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 265 



THEA 4900 INDEPENDENT STUDY 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: ENGL 1101 

Open only to seniors. Independent study in drama, offered on demand. Open to transient students 

only with permission of dean of faculty at Armstrong Atlantic and the student's home institution. 

THEA 4950 CAPSTONE-SENIOR THESIS/PROJECT V-V-3 

Prerequisite: permission of instructor or department 

Open to seniors. Proposal and execution of a major research project or performance demonstrating 
a mastery of methods, content or techniques in area of specialization. Proposal must be accepted 
by drama faculty. 

THEA 4990 INTERNSHIP V-V-(l-12) 

Prerequisite: permission of instructor or department 

Open to juniors. Offered by specific arrangement. Student prepares an individually designed 

project involving off-campus work/study research. 

THEA 5010U TOPICS IN FILM 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: ENGL 2100 or PHIL 2201 or PHIL 2251 

Special topics in film announced when the course is offered. Crosslisted as FILM 5010U. 

THEA 5020U FILM THEORY AND CRITICISM 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: ENGL 2100 or PHIL 2201 or PHIL 2251 

Introduction to the history of film theory and criticism, including classical and contemporary film 
theories and their applications to film criticism. Examination of classical film aesthetics, form, 
language realism and formalism as well as contemporary approaches to film criticism. Applica- 
tion of various theoretical perspectives to selected filmic texts. Crosslisted as FILM 5020U. 

Business Education Courses (Savannah State University) 

ACCT - Accounting 

ACCT 2101 PRINCIPLES OF FINANCIAL ACCOUNTING 3-0-3 

Prerequisites: MATH 1 1 1 1 and CSCI 1 130 

A study of the underlying theory and application of financial accounting concepts. 

ACCT 2102 PRINCIPLES OF MANAGERIAL ACCOUNTING 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: ACCT 2101 

A study of the underlying theory and application of managerial accounting concepts. 

BUSA - Business Administration 

BUS A 1100 INTRODUCTION TO BUSINESS 3-0-3 

An integrative study of the functional areas of business (finance, operations, marketing, human 
resources, etc.) 

BUSA 2105 COMMUNICATING IN THE BUSINESS ENVIRONMENT 3-0-3 

Prerequisites: ENGL 1 lOland 1 102 and CSCI 1 130 

A course emphasizing both interpersonal and organizational communications; to include written 

and oral exercises appropriate to business practice. 

BUSA 2106 THE ENVIRONMENT OF BUSINESS 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: BUSA 1100 

An introduction to the legal, regulatory, political, social, ethical, cultural, environmental, and 
technological issues which form the context for business; to include an overview of the impact of 
demographic diversity on organizations. 



266 ARMSTRONG ATLANTIC STATE UNIVERSITY 



BUSA 4125 PUBLIC POLICY 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: MGNT 3165 

This course examines the external environment of the firm and ways in which the environment 
influences business decision making and business operations. It integrates all parts of business 
environment into a balanced analysis of the whole business system and develops a conceptual 
framework that can be helpful in business policy formulation. The course also attempts to forecast 
the future shape of business and its environment. 

BUSA 4126 BUSINESS POLICY 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: All FKB courses 

Open to seniors only. This is a capstone course in the College of Business Administration and is 

required of all seniors. The course integrates subject matter from the business core courses and 

other disciplines. This course focuses on integrated approaches to medium and long-term 

organizational challenges in a dynamic environment. Students will develop skills in, and 

appreciation of, the role of all managers in the formulation and implementation of organizational 

strategies. 

CISM - Computer Information Systems 

CISM 3135 ADVANCED COMPUTER APPLICATIONS IN BUSINESS 3-0-3 

Open to juniors and above. This course is designed to expose students to various software and 
hardware so they can use current technology to solve real-world business problems. The course 
will include spreadsheet software, graphics software, presentation software, and database man- 
agement software. Students will explore the Internet, including e-mail, telnet, gopher, FTP, World 
Wide Web, Web page publishing, and browser usage. 

ECON - Economics 

ECON 2105 PRINCIPLES OF MICROECONOMICS 3-0-3 

Prerequisites: MATH 1111 and BUSA 1100 

This principles of economics course is intended to introduce students to concepts that will enable 

them to understand and analyze the structure and performance of the market economy. 

ECON 2106 PRINCIPLES OF MACROECONOMICS 3-0-3 

Prerequisites: MATH 1 1 1 1 and BUSA 1 100 

This principles of economics course is intended to introduce students to concepts that will enable 

them to understand and analyze economics aggregates and evaluate economic policies. 

ECON 3145 GLOBAL BUSINESS ISSUES 3-0-3 

Prerequisites: ECON 2105 and ECON 2106 and junior standing 

This course is designed to provide a survey of environmental factors such as culture, economics, 
law, and politics, which affect international business decision-making. The impact of the 
globalization of markets and competition as well as the increasing role of multinational corpora- 
tions is emphasized. 

FINC - Finance 

FINC 3155 BUSINESS FINANCE 3-0-3 

Prerequisites: ECON 2105 and ECON 2106 and ACCT 2102 and QUAN 2182 
Open to junior and above. This course is designed to introduce financial management of non- 
financial corporations and the role of interest rates and capital markets in the economy. Topics 
include the structure and analysis of financial statements, time value of money calculations (using 
financial calculators), stock and bond valuation, financial forecasting, valuation of income- 
producing physical assets, determination of the cost of capital, the profitability of proposed 
investments in fixed assets, risk-return tradeoffs that must be considered in using financial 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 267 



leverage, and methods used in obtaining funds from the various capital markets. This course is 
taught mainly through lectures and class discussions of textual materials and problems. 

MGNT - Management 

MGNT 3165 ORGANIZATIONAL BEHAVIOR AND THEORY 3-0-3 

Prerequisites: ECON 2105 and ECON 2106 

This course is concerned with the study of management theory and practice and their impact on 
organizations. Individual and group behavior within organizations and their relationship to the 
management of the organization are topics of study. Additionally, a number of important topics 
are covered, such as the functions and structures of management in the organizational environ- 
ment, communications, leadership, human resource management, and organizational development 
and change, and their effect on both productivity and performance. Emphasis is placed upon an 
understanding of the social, psychological, and cultural aspects of the work situation. 

MGNT 3167 MANAGEMENT OF TECHNOLOGY 3-0-3 

Prerequisites: MGNT 3165 and CISM 3135 

This course is designed to train future business managersuthe users of information technology 
systems to use all the tools necessary to exploit information technology. The course will train 
students to develop an information systems strategy that will support the business strategy by 
exploiting current information technologies. The course will also review the functions of 
information systems in a business organization, critical success factors of introducing new 
technology, and the steps of introducing new information systems into organizations. 

MKTG - Marketing 

MKTG 3175 PRINCIPLES OF MARKETING 3-0-3 

Prerequisites: ECON 2105 

This course provides a comprehensive overview of the marketing process for goods, services, and 
ideas. The course is taught from a marketing management and decision-making perspective. 
Topics such as the organization's environment, marketing research, and buyer behavior are 
discussed as the context in which marketing plans and strategy are formulated. In addition, the 
marketing decision elements, product, distribution, promotion and price, are examined. Final 1\ . 
topics such as international marketing, services marketing, and nonprofit marketing are explored. 

QUAN - Quantitative Methods 

QUAN 2181 QUANTITATIVE METHODS OF BUSINESS I 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: MATH 1111 

This course covers the necessary elements of statistics, analytic geometry, and calculus needed 

to develop a mathematical foundation for advanced business studies. 

QUAN 2182 QUANTITATIVE METHODS OF BUSINESS II 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: QUAN 2181 

This course provides an introduction to the methods of scientific inquiry and statistical inference. 
Subjects covered are sampling, parameter estimating, hypothesis testing, determination of the 
nature and strength of relationships among variables, decision theory, time series analysis and 
non-parametric methods. The course develops the student's proficiency in the ose of statistical 
software. Spreadsheets and statistical packages are used extensively. 



268 ARMSTRONG ATLANTIC STATE UNIVERSITY 



QUAN 3185 QUANTITATIVE METHODS AND PRODUCTION 

MANAGEMENT 3-0-3 

Prerequisite: QUAN 2182 and junior standing 

This course introduces the student to selected advanced quantitative methods. It is designed to 
facilitate the development of a basic understanding of operations management from the strategic 
viewpoint through Shop Floor Control Methodology. 

CJTC - Criminal Justice Training Center Courses 

CJTC 0071 BASIC LAW ENFORCEMENT SERVICES 6-1-5 

Prerequites: admission to the basic law enforcement mandate training program 
An introduction to the fundamentals of criminal investigation, crime scene processing, finger- 
printing, law enforcement, report writing, interviews and interrogation, and ethics. 

CJTC 0072 BASIC LAW 5-0-5 

Prerequites: admission to the basic law enforcement mandate training program 

Georgia criminal justice system, Georgia law, rules of evidence, criminal procedures, and officer 

liability. 

CJTC 0073 BASIC LAW ENFORCEMENT PROCEDURES 5-V-5 

Prerequites: admission to the basic law enforcement mandate training program 
Topics include cultural diversity, police patrol, courtroom testimony, NCIC/GCIC communica- 
tions and officer survival. 

CJTC 0074 BASIC TRAFFIC SERVICES 3-V-3 

Prerequites: admission to the basic law enforcement mandate training program 
Traffic enforcement, traffic control, motor vehicle law, and accident reporting. 

CJTC 0075 BASIC LAW ENFORCEMENT SKILLS 3-V-3 

Prerequites: admission to the basic law enforcement mandate training program 
Firearms, mechanics of arrest, first aid/CPR, stress reduction, and universal precautions. 

CJTC 0076 COMMUNITY RELATIONS 3-0-3 

Prerequites: admission to the basic law enforcement mandate training program 

Interpersonal communication skills, media relations, crisis intervention, community policing, 

crime prevention, hazardous materials, and mental retardation. 

CJTC 0077 LAW ENFORCEMENT PRACTICUM O-V-6 

Prerequites: admission to the basic law enforcement mandate training program 
Performance-based training in the areas of firearms, crime scene processing, vehicle pullovers, 
fingerprinting, traffic direction and control, mechanics of arrest and booking procedures, critical 
incident management, hazardous materials, and law enforcement report writing. 

MILS - Military Science Courses 

MILS 1101 INTRODUCTION TO MILITARY SCIENCE AND SKILLS 
DEVELOPMENT 2-1-2 

Instruction provides a basic understanding of the U.S. Army and its role in National Defense. The 
course includes the following subjects: the role of the U.S. Army in national defense, organization 
and branches of the U.S. Army, ROTC and its role, customs and traditions of the service, military 
writing, implementing a personal physical fitness program, role of the ARNG and USAR, and 
roles of the commissioned and non-commissioned officer. Skills development includes instruc- 
tion and practical exercises in basic mountaineering skills including knot tying, climbing, 
belaying, and rappelling. Acceptable as a P.E. requirement. 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 269 



MILS 1102 BASIC MILITARY LEADERSHIP 2-1-2 

Development of critical military skills, leadership, and management techniques. Provides basic 
leadership techniques and principles, professional ethics, and senior subordinate relationships. 
One weekend field trip is required. 

MILS 2201 BASIC MILITARY SKILLS 2-1-2 

Instruction and practical exercises covering basic skills necessary as a future leader in the U.S. 
Army. Includes the following subjects: land navigation and map reading, basic first aid, survival, 
and communications. 

MILS 2202 BASIC MILITARY TACTICS 2-1-2 

Instruction introduces students to the fundamentals of Army leadership and management tech- 
niques. Focus is placed on the mission, organization, and composition of small unit teams; 
principles of offensive and defensive operations stressing firepower, movement, and communi- 
cations techniques; and introduction to troop leading procedures. 

MILS 2250 BASIC FIELD INTERNSHIP V-V-5 

Intense summer program conducted at Ft. Knox, Kentucky for six weeks. Designed as an 
alternative method to meet the prerequisites of the advanced course for students who have had no 
basic course military science instruction. 

MILS 3301 ADVANCED TACTICS AND APPLIED LEADERSHIP I 3-2-3 

Instruction on the principles of leadership and the leader's role in directing small units in a variety 
of tactical scenarios. Emphasis is placed on developing and executing orders, troop leading 
procedures, and squad tactical reaction procedures. Land navigation and communication subjects 
are also included in the course. 

MILS 3302 ADVANCED TACTICS AND APPLIED LEADERSHIP II 3-2-3 

Continued instruction on the principles of leadership and the leaders' role in direction small units 
in a tactical environment. Emphasis is placed on offensive and defensive tactics, patrolling 
techniques, and conducting after action reviews. Instruction on management and leadership 
techniques emphasizes Green Tab Leadership and leadership assessment. 

MILS 3350 ADVANCED MILITARY SKILLS PRACTICUM 

(ADVANCED CAMP) V-V-5 

Practical application of military skills and leadership ability during a six week encampment 
experience. Encampment and training is conducted at Ft. Louis, WA. Instruction and evaluation 
done by U.S. Army ROTC Cadet Command. 

MILS 4401 MILITARY LEADERSHIP AND MANAGEMENT SEMINAR V-V-5 

Instruction covers U.S. Army Command and Staff functions. Military and professional knowl- 
edge topics include writing in the Army style, oral communications, conducting briefings, 
preparing to conduct training, and evaluating training. 

MILS 4402 TRANSITION TO AN ARMY LIEUTENANT 1 -3-2 

Instruction prepares MS IV cadets in their transition from cadet/student to commissioned officer. 
The course also covers Military Law, the Law of Land Warfare, and additional basic knowledge 
an individual needs to become a professional officer. 

NSCI - Naval Science Courses 

NSCI 1001 INTRODUCTION TO NAVAL SCIENCE 2-0-2 

Introduces midshipmen to NROTC Program mission, organization, regulations and broad warfare 
components of the naval service. Included is an overview of officer and enlisted rank and rating 
structure, training and education, promotion and advancement and retirement policies. This 



270 ARMSTRONG ATLANTIC STATE UNIVERSITY 



course also covers naval courtesy and customs, as well as a study of the organization of the naval 
service. Students are familiarized with the major challenges facing today's naval officers, 
especially, in the areas of leadership and human resources management. Fall. 

NSCI 1002 SEAPOWER AND MARITIME AFFAIRS 3-0-3 

A survey of American Naval and Maritime history from the American Revolution to the present 
with emphasis on major developments. Attention will be focused on Mahan's geopolitical theory; 
economic and maritime forces; U.S. military and maritime strategy; and a comparative analysis 
of American and foreign maritime strategies. Spring. 

NSCI 1003 SAILING 2-2-3 

Prerequisite : Certification as a third class swimmer 

A foundation course that provides students with fundamental knowledge and skills to be 
competent crew members. The course covers the basic theory of sailing, nomenclature, seaman- 
ship, boat equipment and safety, and applicable inland waters navigation rules for sailing craft. 
Upon completion of this course, students will be Skipper "B" qualified. Practical skills to be 
mastered consist of rigging and sailing from a pier: sail to weather; sail two figure eight courses 
with two tacks and two jibes; man overboard maneuver; a capsize; return to dock and secure. 
Spring. 

NSCI 2001, -2 NAVIGATION I AND II 2-2-3 

An in-depth study of piloting and celestial navigation theory, principles, and procedures, as well 
as the rules of the nautical road, ship employment and relative motion analysis. Students learn 
piloting navigation: the use of charts, visual and electronic aids, and the theory and operation of 
compasses. Celestial navigation is covered in depth. Students develop practical skills in piloting, 
celestial navigation, and relative motion analysis. Other topics include tides, currents, effects of 
wind and weather, use of navigational instruments, ship employment, types and characteristics of 
electronic navigation systems, naval command and control, and afloat naval communications. 
Fall/Spring Sequence. 

NSCI 3001 NAVAL SHIPS SYSTEMS I (ENGINEERING) 3-0-3 

A detailed study of ship characteristics and types, including ship design, hydrodynamic forces, 
stability, compartmentation, propulsion, electrical and auxiliary systems, interior communica- 
tions, ship control and damage control. Basic concepts or the theory and design of steam, gas 
turbine and nuclear propulsion, shipboard safety and firefighting are also covered. Spring. 

NSCI 3002 EVOLUTION OF WARFARE 5-0-5 

Open only to juniors and seniors. This course traces the historic development of warfare from the 
dawn of recorded history to the present, focusing on the impact of major military theorists, 
strategists, tacticians, and technological developments. Students acquire a basic sense of strategy, 
development and understanding of military alternatives, and become aware of the impact of 
historical precedent on military thought and actions. Fall. 

NSCI 4001 NAVAL SHIPS SYSTEMS II (WEAPONS) 3-0-3 

This course outlines the theory and employment of naval RADAR, SONAR, and weapons 
systems. Students explore the processes of detection, evaluation, threat analysis, weapon selec- 
tion, delivery, guidance and naval ordnance. Fire control systems, major weapons types, and 
military platforms are discussed. The concept of command-control-communications and intelli- 
gence is explored as a means of weapons systems integration, as are space and electronic warfare. 
Fall. 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 271 



NSCI 4002 AMPHIBIOUS WARFARE 5-0-5 

Open only to juniors and seniors. A historical survey of the development of amphibious doctrine 
and the conduct of amphibious operations. Emphasis is placed on the evolution of amphibious 
warfare in the twentieth century, especially, during World War II. Present day, potential, 
amphibious operations and their limitations, including the rapid deployment force concept, will 
be discussed. Spring. 

NSCI 4003, -4 ADVANCED LEADERSHIP AND MANAGEMENT I AND II 1-0-1 

Prerequisite: promulgated by commanding officer 

A study of leadership responsibilities of a junior naval officer. These courses are intended to help 
the student develop leadership abilities that they can use in an ethical manner. Items of study will 
include: case studies in leadership and the ethical use of power and authority; military justice; 
directive and correspondence; naval personnel administration; material management and main- 
tenance; and the navy supply system. The student will prepare for the personnel and professional 
responsibilities of a junior officer. Fall/Spring Sequence. 

NSCI 4005 ADVANCED LEADERSHIP AND MANAGEMENT III 1-0-1 

Prerequisite: NSC 4003 

Open only to seniors. Personnel administration for the U.S. Marine Corps junior officer. Topics 
covered will include: directive and correspondence; Marine Corps personnel administration; 
material management and maintenance; and the Marine Corps supply system. The student will 
prepare for the personnel and professional responsibilities of a junior Marine Corps leader. Spring. 

NSCI 4500 NAVAL DRILL 0-2-0 

Introduces the student to basic military formations, movements, commands, courtesies and 
honors, and provides practice in unit leadership and management. Physical conditioning and 
training are provided to ensure students meet Navy/Marine Corps physical fitness standards. 
Successful completion of two semesters by NROTC students satisfies Savannah State University's 
physical education requirement. (NSCI 4500 is required every semester for all NROTC students.) 
Fall and Spring. 



272 ARMSTRONG ATLANTIC STATE UNIVERSITY 



Special Programs 



STUDY ABROAD 



Study abroad programs (SAP) of the University System of Georgia provide students with a 
multitude of opportunities to study abroad while earning academic credit toward completion of 
the degree requirements at their home campus. SAP currently offers summer study programs in 
countries around the world: Russia, Estonia, Canada, Israel, Argentina, Brazil, Costa Rica, 
Mexico, China, Japan, Australia, Ethiopia, Tanzania, the Ivory Coast, France, Germany, Italy, and 
Spain. Semester and academic year opportunities are available in several countries in Europe. 

Studying abroad enables students to increase their fluency in a foreign language, provides the 
opportunity to gain appreciation for the cultures and institutions of other peoples, facilitates the 
development of relevant career skills, and contributes to personal maturity, a sense of indepen- 
dence, self-knowledge, and confidence. 

Study abroad programs are open to all undergraduate students with a minimum cumulative 
grade point average of 2.5; however, certain programs may require a higher grade point average 
and completion of prerequisites. Graduate students are required to have a 3.0 grade point average. 
Students in the University System of Georgia who are eligible for financial aid may use that aid 
toward study abroad programs. A limited number of scholarships are available from some system 
institutions. For further information, contact the international student services office on campus, 
or the system coordinator for study abroad programs, International Services and Programs, the 
University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602. Phone 706/542-1557 and fax 706/542-6622. 

LEARNING SUPPORT 

Faculty 

Cynthia Geoffroy, Department Head 

Beth Childress 

Dianne Jones Nancy Remler 

Denice Josten Edwin Richardson 

Edward Oglesby Carolyn Smith 

General Information 

The Department of Learning Support meets the academic needs of students who require 
structured learning support before they attempt core curriculum courses. The department serves 
students who are required to enroll in remediation courses according to university system or 
institutional placement standards. Students may elect to take learning support courses without 
penalty in order to prepare for the core. The department also administers the Regents' remediation 
course in reading. Limited admission students must enroll in accordance with the stipulations of 
their admission (see the Limited Admission section of this catalog). All students taking any 
learning support course will be advised and registered by full-time members of the learning 
support department. 

Progress Requirements 

Students may not accumulate more than twenty hours of college-level credit before completing 
all learning support requirements. Students still required to take learning support courses after 
completing twenty semester hours may register only for required learning support courses. 

Students not passing MATH 0097 or ENGL 0098 after two semesters in the course will be 
suspended and may not be considered for readmission within one year of suspension. Part of the 



SPECIAL PROGRAMS 273 



appeal to return may include passing a departmental exam covering topics from the first level 
course, writing an essay, or taking the CPE. 

Students not passing ENGL 0099, MATH 0099, or READ 0099 after two semesters in the 
course will be suspended. A student may not be considered for readmission within one year of 
suspension. Before being suspended , a student may be allowed to appeal for one additional 
course. Such a student must be individually evaluated and determined to have a reasonable chance 
for success. If granted the additional course, the student may enroll only in that learning support 
course. 

Students not completing requirements for an area in three semesters will be suspended, and 
may not be considered for readmission within three years of the suspension. Prior to such a 
suspension, a student may be allowed to appeal for one additional course, if the following criteria 
are met: (1) the student is individually evaluated and determined to have a reasonable chance for 
success; (2) the student is in an exit level course; and (3) the student has reached the limit on 
attempts in only one learning support area. If granted the additional course, the student may enroll 
only in the learning support course. 

BASIC LAW ENFORCEMENT CERTIFICATE 

Faculty 

Gregory Sewell, Department Head 

John Eustace Warren Washington 

Robert Keele Maurice Watkins 

Wynn Sullivan 

General Information 

The Basic Law Enforcement Certificate Program enables students to become candidates for 
Georgia law enforcement certification. Students wishing to enroll in this certificate program must 
come to the Criminal Justice Training Center for advisement and a detailed admittance package. 

Admission Requirements 

Traditional applicants must have a high school diploma or have completed the GED satisfac- 
torily, and have SAT/ ACT scores. Applicants are exempt from CPC requirements, but must take 
the CPE or COMPASS examinations if SAT/AT scores are lower than 430 verbal and/or 400 math. 

Non-traditional applicants are those who have not attended high school or college within the 
previous five years and have earned fewer than 15 transferable semester hours of college credit. 
Such applicants must have a high school diploma or have completed the GED satisfactorily. They 
are exempt from SAT/ ACT and CPC requirements, but CPE or COMPASS examinations are 
required unless students report SAT/ACT scores at the 430 verbal and 400 math levels or above. 

For students who take no courses with a learning support prerequisite in an area (or areas) the 
learning support requirements in that area (or areas) are not mandatory. 

A transfer applicant with fewer than 30 transferable semester hours will be subject to 
traditional applicant standards unless he or she meets the definition of a non-traditional student. 
Applicants having 30 or more transferable semester hours must have a grade point average of at 
least 2.0. 

Any student admitted to a certificate program who chooses to pursue an Armstrong Atlantic 
State University degree must meet all university and program admission requirements. 



274 ARMSTRONG ATLANTIC STATE UNIVERSITY 



MILITARY SCIENCE (Army ROTC) 

Faculty 

Captain Zane Jones, Department Head 
Kattie Tisdale 
Tommie Pullins 

General Information 

The Army Department of Military Science is a Senior Division Reserve Officer Training Corps 
(ROTC) Instructor Group, staffed by active army personnel. The department provides a curricu- 
lum available to Armstrong Atlantic State University and Savannah State University students that 
qualifies the college graduate for a commission as an officer in the U.S. Army, U.S. Army Reserve, 
or the U.S. National Guard. Qualifying for a commission adds an extra dimension to the student's 
employment capability in that, upon graduation from the university, the student has either military 
or civilian employment options. Enrollment in military science classes is open to all students. 

The course of study offered in military science is designed not only to prepare both the student 
for service as a commissioned officer in the U.S. Army but also to provide knowledge and practical 
experience in leadership and management that will be useful in any facet of society. Male and 
female students are eligible for enrollment. Each student is provided with a working knowledge 
of the organization and functioning of the Department of Defense and the role of the U.S. Army 
in national security and world affairs. 

The course of study pursued by students during their freshman and sophomore years is the basic 
military science course and/or related skill activities. The course of study normally pursued by 
students during their junior and senior years is the advanced military science course. 

For selection and retention in the advanced course, a student must be physically qualified, 
should have maintained above average military and academic standing, and must demonstrate a 
potential for further leadership development. 

Graduates of the advanced course are commissioned second lieutenants in the branch of 
service most appropriate to their interests and academic achievements, consistent with the needs 
of the army. Regardless of the branch selected, all officers will receive valuable experience in 
management, logistics, and administration. Graduates may be granted a delay in reporting for duty 
for graduate study, if requested. A small number of outstanding students are designated Distin- 
guished Military Graduates and are offered commissions in the regular army each year. 

Basic Military Science 

Basic military science courses involve four semesters during the freshman and sophomore 
years. The student learns leadership and management and acquires essential background knowl- 
edge of customs and traditions, weapons, map reading, tactics, and survival. Equally important, 
these courses have the objective of developing self-discipline, integrity, and sense of responsibil- 
ity. MILS 1 101, MILS 1 102, MILS 2201, MILS 2202. 

Advanced Military Science 

The general objective of this course of instruction is to produce junior officers who by 
education, training, attitude, and inherent qualities are suitable for continued development as army 
officers. There are two avenues available for entering the advanced program and obtaining a 
commission as a second lieutenant: 



SPECIAL PROGRAMS 275 



• satisfactory completion of, or placement credit for, the basic program at Armstrong Atlantic 
or at any other school, college, or university offering basic ROTC and meeting the entrance and 
retention requirements established by the Army; 

• to be an active duty veteran or junior ROTC cadet graduate eligible for placement credit. 
MILS 3301, MILS 3302, MILS 4401, MILS 4402. 

Placement 

Veterans entering the military science programs will receive appropriate placement credit for 
their active military service. Students who have completed military science courses in military 
preparatory schools or junior colleges may be given appropriate credit. Students with at least four 
years of high school ROTC may also be granted placement credit. Placement credit or four 
semesters of basic military science, or the equivalent thereof, is a prerequisite to admission into 
the advanced program. 

Alternate Programs for Admittance 

Students with two years of coursework remaining, but who have not completed basic military 
science, are eligible to be considered for selection into the advanced military science program. 
Those selected under the provisions of the two-year advanced program must satisfactorily 
complete a basic summer camp of five weeks duration prior to entering the advanced program. 
Students attending the basic camp at Fort Knox, Kentucky, are paid at active army rates and given 
a travel allowance from their home to camp and return. Attendance at basic camp is voluntary and 
incurs no military obligation until the student returns and decides to sign a contract to pursue a 
commission. 

Participating Students and Aliens 

Participating students are students who participate in military science courses but are not fully 
enrolled or are ineligible for enrollment in the ROTC programs. Participating and alien students 
may enroll in the military science classes provided they meet the requirements outlined in army 
regulations and are approved by the department head and/or school authorities. Although these 
students may enroll in military science classes, they may only participate in classroom instruc- 
tions. They will not participate in any high risk training, drill, marching, leadership laboratories, 
field training exercises, voluntary programs, or attend basic or advanced camp. These students 
will also not be issued or wear the uniform, nor receive credit toward commissioning or enlisted 
grade status through completion of ROTC courses. 

Advanced Summer Camp 

Students contracting to pursue the advanced courses are required to attend advanced summer 
camp, normally between their junior and senior academic years at Fort Lewis, Washington. MILS 
2250. MILS 3350, MILS 3351. 

Financial Assistance 

All contracted advanced course cadets are paid a subsistence allowance of $150 per month 
while enrolled in the program. 

Scholarships 

Each year the U.S. Army awards two- and three-year scholarships to outstanding young men 
and women participating in the Army ROTC program who desire careers as army officers. The 
army pays tuition, fees, books and laboratory expenses incurred by the scholarship student. In 
addition, each student receives $150 per month for the academic year. The Savannah Volunteer 



276 ARMSTRONG ATLANTIC STATE UNIVERSITY 

Guards have established a full-tuition scholarship for qualified incoming freshmen enrolled in 
ROTC classes. No military obligation is incurred. The scholarship is for one year, with a 
possibility of renewal for the next school year. Individuals desiring to compete for these 
scholarships should apply to the Military Science Department. 

Army ROTC Uniforms, Books and Supplies 

Students enrolling in the Army ROTC program will be issued U.S. Army uniforms, books, and 
supplies by the Military Science Department. No fees or deposits of any kind will be required. 
Uniforms must be returned before commissioning or upon disenrollment from the ROTC 
program. 

MILS Courses 

The basic course of four semester duration consists of two hours of instruction work per week. 
Students acquire knowledge of military leadership, weapons, tactics, basic military skills, and 
physical fitness. In field training exercises, potential for leadership is progressively developed. 
Basic course students are invited and encouraged to attend military science leadership laboratories 
and physical training sessions. 

The advanced course consists of three hours of classroom work and one hour of leadership 
laboratory per week. During the spring quarter prior to advanced camp the student will enroll in 
MILS 3302 to prepare for attendance at advanced camp. MILS 2001 - The Evolution of Military 
Warfare is normally taken spring semester of the senior year. The coursework during the advanced 
course emphasizes techniques, management, leadership, and the fundamentals and dynamics of 
the military team. Field training exercises provide the student with applied leadership experiences. 
Participation in leadership laboratories and physical training sessions are mandatory. 

Professional Military Education (PME) Requirements 

The army's professional military education requirements are established to provide cadets 
with the training and enrichment necessary to successfully compete in the army. In addition to 
completing a baccalaureate degree, the cadet must complete one undergraduate course from each 
of the five designed fields of study (some of these requirements may be waived for nursing 
majors). The five PME designated fields of study are listed below and the courses that meet the 
cadet command PME requirement: 

• Written Communications Skills: ENGL 1 101, ENGL 1 102, and ENGL 1 102H 

• Human Behavior: PSYS 1 101, SOCI 1 101, HIST 1111, HIST 1 1 12, and ANTH 1 101 

• Math Reasoning: MATH 101 1 and MATH 1113 

• Military History: MILS 2001 

• Computer Literacy: CSCI 1112, CSCI 1301, and CSCI 2060 

Minor 

The department offers a minor in military science. The program is designed to prepare the 
student for a commission in the U.S. Army and is offered to, but not required of, those students 
participating in the advanced course of Army ROTC instruction. Whatever the major, a military 
science minor will strengthen a student's management, leadership, and interpersonal communi- 
cation skills. The minor requires: 

Twenty credit hours with grades of C or better in any of the following upper division military 
science courses: MILS 1101, MILS 1102, MILS 2201, MILS 2202, MILS 2250, MILS 3302, 
MILS 4401, MILS 4402, MILS 2001. 



SPECIAL PROGRAMS 277 



NAVAL SCIENCE (Naval ROTC) 

Faculty 

Commander Welch Fair, Jr., USN, Department Head 
Commander James Hicks, USN Major Drexel Heard, USMC 

Lt. Otto Willis, USN Lt. Seth Kovensky, USN 

GY Sgt. William Meekins, USMC SKC Roberto Novoa, USN 

YNC Arthur Best, III, USN 

General Information 

Naval Reserve Officer Training Corps (NROTC) prepares students for commissioned service 
as regular or reserve officers in the Navy and Marine Corps. 

The department offers a minor in naval science. The program is designed to prepare the student 
for a commission in the U.S. Navy and is required of those NROTC students who will obtain a 
commission. All course work must be completed with a grade of C or better. 

Minor 

Seventeen semester hours consisting of the following: 

NSCI 1001 Introduction to Naval Science 

NSCI 1002 Seapower and Maritime Affairs 

NSCI 2001 Navigation I 

NSCI 2002 Navigation II 

NSCI 3001 Naval Ships Systems I (engineering) 

NSCI 4001 Naval Ships Systems II (weapons) 

Non-Scholarship Navy College Program Midshipmen 

These students must complete one year of math, college algebra or higher, by the end of the 
junior year and one year of physical science by the end of the senior year as a prerequisite for 
commissioning. The physical science requirement can be met by completing a one year sequence, 
or two courses in any area of physical science. One mathematics course may be selected from the 
field of computer science or statistics. 

Marine Corps Option 

All Marine Corps option students shall take, during the junior or senior year, one course in 
military history and one in political science (6 hours total) from a list approved by the professor 
of naval science. 

NROTC Uniforms, Books, and Instructional Materials 

NROTC uniforms, books, and special instructional materials will be issued at no charge to 
naval scholarship and college program students. Uniforms must be returned upon exit from the 
NROTC Program. Books and other instructional materials must be returned at the completion of 
each academic term. 



278 ARMSTRONG ATLANTIC STATE UNIVERSITY 



Scholarships 

Scholarships are available to qualified students for tuition, fees, books, and laboratory 
expenses. The programs can pay for up to four years of expenses and includes a $150 per month 
tax free stipend. Additionally, the professor of naval science has five scholarships to be awarded 
to qualified high school graduates. 

Financial Assistance 

All midshipmen in the advanced NROTC Program (junior and senior years) are paid a $150 
per month tax-free stipend. 

Summer Training Cruises 

Scholarship midshipmen will go on summer training cruises during three of their summer 
inter-term periods. Other midshipmen will attend summer training cruises based on their 
scholarship programs. 

PROGRAM OF STUDY 

ALL MIDSHIPMEN: 

NSCI 1001, 1002, 1003 8 hours 

Business Management 3 hours 

(Courses satisfying the management requirement will be promulgated by the professor of naval 
science.) 

Advanced Program - Navy Option: 

NSCI 2001, 2002 6 hours 

NSCI 3001 3 hours 

NSCI 4001, 4003, 4004 5 hours 

Advanced Program - Marine Corps Option: 

NSCI 3002 5 hours 

NSCI 4002, 4003, 4005 7 hours 

Additional and Substitute Requirements: 

NSCI 4050, Naval Drill (0-2-0), is required each academic term of all midshipmen. 
NSCI 1003 and 5040 satisfy the university physical education requirement. 

Navy Scholarship Midshipmen (additional requirements): 

One year of calculus (completed by the junior year) 6 hours 

One year of calculus-based physics (completed by senior year) 6 hours 

Computer science 3 hours 

Military history and political science 6 hours 

(Specific courses that satisfy the above requirement will be promulgated 
by the professor of naval science.) 



FACULTY 



279 



Faculty and Administration 

Permanent, Full-Time Members of the Teaching Corps or 
Administrative Staff 

This list includes only individuals who have faculty voting privileges. The number in 
parentheses after the names represents the initial year of employment at Armstrong Atlantic State 
University. An asterisk indicates full graduate faculty status. 



Aenchbacher, Louis E., Ill (1980) 

Athletic Director 

Associate Professor of Physical Education 

Ed.D., University of Georgia 

M.Ed., University of Georgia 

B.S., Armstrong State College 

* Agyekum, Stephen K. (1979) 

Professor of Education 
Ed.D., University of Georgia 
M.A., University of Georgia 
A.B., Johnson C. Smith University 

Andersen, Jody C. (1996) 

Assistant Professor of Physical Therapy 
Ph.D., Ohio University 
M.S., Texas Women's University 
B.S., Mankato State University 

Anderson, Gregory (1996) 

Director, Academic Orientation and Advisement 
Instructor of Education 

M.Ed., University of South Carolina 

B.A., Bridgewater State College 

* Anderson, James N. (1985) 

Head of Art, Music & Theatre Department 
Professor of Music 

Ph.D., University of Texas-Austin 

M.M., University of Houston 

B.M.E., Wichita State University 

* Andrews, Carol M. (1988) 

Associate Professor of English 
Ph.D., Vanderbilt University 
M.A., Vanderbilt University 
B.A., Furman University 

* Arens, Olavi (1974) 
Professor of History 

Ph.D., Columbia University 
M.A., Columbia University 
A.B., Harvard University 

Awong-Taylor, Judy (1993) 

Assistant Professor of Biology 
Ph.D., University of Florida 
M.S., University of Florida 
B.S., University of the West Indies 



* Baker, Christopher P. (1994) 

Professor of English 
Ph.D., University of North Carolina 
M.A., University of North Carolina 
B.A., St. Lawrence University 

Ball, A. Patricia (1968) 

Associate Professor of Library Science 
Sc.D., Nova University 
M.S., Atlanta University 
A.B., Fisk University 

* Barnard, Jane T. (1980) 

Associate Professor of Mathematics 
Ed.S., Georgia Southern College 
M.S., Georgia Southern College 
B.S., Georgia Southern College 

Barton, Robin (1995) 

Assistant Professor of Special Education 
Ed.D.. College of William and Mary 
Ed.S., College of William and Mary 
M.Ed., Virginia Commonwealth University 
B.S., Towson State University 

*Battiste, Bettye A. (1980) 

Associate Professor of Education 
Ed.D., University of Florida 
M.Ed., State University of New York 
B.S., Savannah State College 

Bennett, Katherine (1997) 

Associate Professor of Criminal Justice 
Ph.D., Sam Houston State Universit) 
M.C.J., University of South Carolina 
B.S., University of South Carolina- 
Spartanburg 

*Bergin, Joyce (1992) 

Associate Professor of Education 
Ed.D.. East Texas State Universit) 
M.Ed., William and Mary College 
M.L.S., Texas Woman's Universit) 
B.A.. Virginia Polytechnic Institute 

*Beumer, Ronald J. (1975) 

Professor of Biology 
Ph.D.. University of Arkansas 
B.S.. Universit) of Dayton 



280 



ARMSTRONG ATLANTIC STATE UNIVERSITY 



Blossman, M. Ellen (1995) 

Associate Professor of Spanish 
Ph.D., Louisiana State University 
M.A., Louisiana State University 
B.A., Louisiana State University 

Bowers, Ross L., Ill (1979) 

Head of Respiratory Therapy Department 
Assistant Professor of Respiratory Therapy 

M.H.S., Armstrong State College 

B.S., Georgia State University 

Brandt, Patricia (1995) 

Assistant Dean of Education 
Associate Professor of Education 
Ed.D., Florida Atlantic University 
M.S., California State University 
B.A., Houghton College 

Brawner, James (1997) 

Assistant Professor of Mathematics 
Ph.D., University of North Carolina- 
Chapel Hill 
B.A., Williams College 

Brooks, Donna (1995) 

Associate Professor of Special Education 
Ph.D., Purdue University 
M.A., Hampton Institute 
B.S., Hampton Institute 

Brown, George E. (1972) 

Assistant Professor of Criminal Justice 
M.S.S.W., Atlanta University 
B.S.W., Armstrong State College 
A.B., Armstrong State College 

* Brush, Sabitra S. (1993) 

Assistant Professor of Chemistry 
Ph.D., Florida State University 
M.S., Florida State University 
B.S., University of the West Indies 

Buchanan, Scott R. (1998) 

Assistant Professor of Music 
Ph.D., University of Missouri-Kansas City 
M.M.E., Florida State University 
B.M.E., Bradley University 

Buck, Joseph A., Ill (1968) 

Vice President for Student Affairs 
Ed.D., University of Georgia 
M.S., Florida State University 
B.A., Auburn University 

* Buck, Marilyn M. (1974) 
Assistant Dean of Health Professions 
Professor of Nursing 

Ed.D., University of South Carolina 
M.S.N., Medical College of Georgia 
B.S.N., Boston University 



* Butler, Frank A. (1985) 

Interim President 

Professor of Physics 
Ph.D., Rensselaer Polytechnic 
B.S.E.S., University of Miami 

* Bykat, Alexander (1992) 

Callaway Professor of Computer Science 
Ph.D., University of London 
M.Sc, University of London 
B.Sc, City of Leicester Polytechnic 

* Byrd, James T. (1990) 

Associate Professor of Chemistry 
Ph.D., Florida State University 
M.S.P.H., University of North Carolina- 
Chapel Hill 
A.B., University of North Carolina- 
Chapel Hill 

Caldwell, Eva (1987) 

Assistant Professor of Nursing 
M.S.N., Medical College of Georgia 
B.S.N., Armstrong State College 

Canning, Rick (1996) 

Assistant Professor of English 
Ph.D., University of Illinois 
M.A., University of Missouri-Columbia 
B.A., Oklahoma Christian College 

Carpenter, Suzanne (1988) 

Assistant Professor of Chemistry 
M.S., University of North Carolina- 
Chapel Hill 
B.S., Auburn University 
A. A., Lake-Sumter Junior College 

Cato, Thomas (1993) 

Assistant Professor of Art 
Ed.D., University of Georgia 
M.Ed., Valdosta State College 
B.F.A., Valdosta State College 

Chenault, George S. (1992) 

Assistant Professor of Education 
Ph.D., University of Iowa 
M.Ed., South Carolina State College 
B.S., South Carolina State College 

Childress, Beth (1990) 

Assistant Professor of Reading 
M.A., New York University 
B.A., Temple University 

Clancy, Frank M. (1989) 

Assistant Professor of English 
M.A., Villanova University 
B.S., Villanova University 



FACULTY 



281 



Clark, Sandra H. (1990) 

Assistant Professor of Nursing 
M.S.N., Medical College of Georgia 
B.S.N., Armstrong State College 

Clevenger, Karen (1998) 

Associate Professor of Physical Education 
Ed.D., Oklahoma State University 
M.Ed., Georgia State University 
B.S., West Georgia College 

Coberly, Patricia (1996) 

Acting Head of Middle/Secondary Education 

Department 

Assistant Professor of Middle Grades 

Education 

Ed.D., University of Arkansas 

M.Ed., University of Arkansas 

B.S., Arkansas Tech University 

Coleman, Jo Ann (1996) 

Assistant Professor of Middle Grades 

Education 
Ed.D., East Texas State University 
M.A.T., University of Texas 
B.A., East Texas State University 

* Connor, Sara E. (1980) 

Interim Vice President 

Professor of Nursing 
Ed.D., University of Georgia 
M.S.N., Medical College of Georgia 
B.S.N., Medical College of Georgia 

Conway, Marian (1987) 

Assistant Professor of Nursing 
M.S.N., Medical College of Georgia 
B.S.N., Georgia College 

* Cooksey, Thomas L. (1987) 

Associate Professor of English and 

Philosophy 
Ph.D., University of Oregon 
M.A., California Polytechnic State 

University 
B.A., University of California 

* Cosgrove, Maryellen S. (1989) 

Acting Head of Early Childhood Education 

Department 

Professor of Education 
Ph.D., University of Connecticut 
M.A., University of Connecticut 
B.S., University of Connecticut 

Cottrell, Isabel D. (1992) 

Assistant Professor of Spanish 
Ph.D., Florida State University 
M.A., University of Texas- Arlington 
B.A., University of Texas- Austin 



Counsil, Roger L. (1991) 

Professor of Physical Education 
Ed.D., Indiana University 
M.S., Southern Illinois University 
B.S., Southern Illinois University 

Coursey, Teresa (1971) 

Assistant Professor of Dental Hygiene 
M.H.S., Armstrong State College 
B.S., West Liberty State College 

* Crosby, Joseph (1995) 

Assistant Professor of Health Science 
Ph.D., University of Georgia 
B.S., University of Georgia 

Cross, Deanna S. (1989) 

Assistant Dean of Adult Academic Services 
Professor of Nursing 

Ph.D., Boston College 

M.S.N., Boston College 

B.S.N., University of Akron 

* Dandy, Evelyn B. (1974) 
Professor of Education 

Ph.D., University of South Carolina 
M.Ed., Temple University 
B.S., Millersville State College 

Daugherty, William (1997) 

Assistant Professor of Political Science 
Ph.D., Claremont Graduate School 
B.A., University of California-Irvine 

Deaux, Patricia M. (1993) 

Assistant Professor of Library Science 
M.L.I.S., University of South Carolina 
B.F.A., University of Georgia 

Deaver, William (1994) 

Assistant Professor of Spanish 
Ph.D., Florida State University 
M.A., University of Virginia 
B.A., University of Virginia 

DeMarco, Mary Lou (1998) 

Assistant Professor of Radiation Therapy 
M.S., Nova Southeastern University 
B.S., State University of New York- 
Albany 
A.S., Erie Community College 

Dinnebeil, Mary Elizabeth (1995) 

Instructor of Library Science 
M.S., University of North Carolina 
M.S., Syracuse University 
B.A., Michigan State University 



282 



ARMSTRONG ATLANTIC STATE UNIVERSITY 



* Donahue, Michael E. (1993) 

Head of Criminal Justice, Social and Political 

Science Department 

Associate Professor of Criminal Justice 
Ph.D., Michigan State University 
M.S., University of South Carolina 
B.A., University of North Carolina- 
Charlotte 

Douglass, W. Keith (1970) 

Interim Head of Psychology 

Professor of Psychology 
Ph.D., Syracuse University 
M.A., Syracuse University 
B.A., Franklin & Marshall College 

Dubus, Judy (1990) 

Assistant Professor of Library Science 
M.S., Florida State University 
A.B., University of Georgia 

* Dumpe, David (1995) 

Assistant Professor of Health Science 
Ph.D., Kent State University 
M.S., University of Northern Colorado 
B.A., Capital University 

Dunn, Barbara (1994) 

Assistant Professor of Nursing 
M.S., St. Louis University 
B.S., Maryville College 
A.A., Maryville College 

Edenfield, Suzanne (1983) 
Assistant Professor of Dental Hygiene 
Ed.D., Nova Southeastern University 
M.H.S., Armstrong State College 
B.S., Armstrong State College 

* Fertig, Barbara (1992) 

Associate Professor of History 
Ph.D., George Washington University 
B.S., Skidmore College 

* Finlay, Mark (1992) 

Associate Professor of History 
Ph.D., Iowa State University 
M.A., Iowa State University 
B.A., Grinnell College 

Fox, Patricia (1993) 

M.A., Northeastern University 
M.A., San Diego State University 
B.A., University of Pittsburgh 

Frazier, Douglas R. (1991) 

Assistant Professor of Library Science 
M.L.S., University of Washington 
B.A., Western Washington State College 



Fuller, Ann (1997) 

Assistant Professor of Library Science 
M.L.I.S., University of South Carolina- 
Columbia 
B.A., Armstrong State College 

Garcia, Migdalia (1996) 

Assistant Professor of Education 
Ed.D., Vanderbilt University 
M.Ed., University of Puerto Rico 
B.A., University of Puerto Rico 

Geoffroy, Cynthia D. (1978) 

Head of Department of Learning Support 

Assistant Professor of Mathematics 

M.S., University of South Carolina 

B.A., Westfield State College 

Gibson, Sharyn (1983) 

Head of Radiologic Sciences 

Assistant Professor of Radiologic Technologies 

Ed.D., Nova Southeastern University 

M.H.S., Armstrong State College 

B.S., St. Joseph's College 

A. A., Armstrong State College 

Gleeson, David (1997) 

Assistant Professor of History 
Ph.D., Mississippi State University 
M.A., Mississippi State University 
B.A., University of Westminster 

Green, Rachel (1992) 

Associate Professor of Art 
M.F.A., University of Georgia 
B.F.A., Middle Tennessee State University 

Greenlaw, Raymond (1998) 

Head of Department of Computer Science 
Professor of Computer Science 

Ph.D., University of Washington 

M.S., University of Washington 

B.A., Pomona College 

Guillou, Laurent J., Jr. (1970) 

Professor of Biology 
Ph.D., Louisiana State University 
M.S., Louisiana State University 
B.S., Louisiana State University 

Hall, Donald (1998) 

Associate Professor of Education 
Ph.D., Ohio University 
M.Ed., Westminster College 
B.S.Ed., Indiana University of Pennsylvania 

Hall, Michael (1997) 
Assistant Professor of History 

Ph.D., Ohio University 

M.A., Ohio University 

B.A., Gettysburg College 



FACULTY 



283 






Hampton, Edwin Kevin (1996) 

Assistant Professor of Music 
D.M.A., University of Maryland 
M.M., Drake University 
B.M., William Jewell College 

Hansen, John R. (1967) 

Professor of Mathematics 
Ed.D., University of Georgia 
M.Ed., University of Georgia 
B.S., Troy State College 

Hardegree, Lester E., Jr. (1982) 

Head of Medical Technology Department 
Assistant Professor of Medical Technology 

Ed.D., Nova Southeastern University 

M.Ed., Georgia State University 

B.S., Medical College of Georgia 

B.S., University of Georgia 

Harris, Henry E. (1966) 

Associate Dean of Arts and Sciences 

Professor of Chemistry 
Ph.D., Georgia Institute of Technology 
B.S., Georgia Institute of Technology 

Harris, Robert L. (1981) 

Professor of Music 
D.M.A., University of Washington 
M.M., University of the Pacific 
B.M., University of the Pacific 

* Hart, Marcella (1986) 

Associate Professor of Nursing 
M.N., University of Washington 
B.S.N., St. John College 

* Harwood, Pamela L. (1985) 

Acting Head of Special Education Department 

Associate Professor of Education 
Ed.D., Auburn University 
M.A., Appalachian State University 
B.S., Appalachian State University 

Haya, Glenn (1997) 

Instructor of Library Science 
M.L.S., Rutgers University 
M.S.T., University of Chicago 
B.A., Rutgers University 

* Hendricks, Christopher E. (1993) 

Assistant Professor of History 
Ph.D., College of William and Mary 
M.A., College of William and Mary 
B.A., Wake Forest University 

Hessinger, Sabrina (1997) 

Assistant Professor of Mathematics 
Ph.D., North Carolina State University 
B.S., Gannon University 



Hizer,ToddJ. (1989) 

Associate Professor of Chemistry 
Ph.D., University of South Carolina 
B.S., Old Dominion University 

Hobe, John J. (1991) 

Associate Professor of Education 
Ed.D., University of San Francisco 
M.A., California State University 
B.S.Ed., Bowling Green State University 

Holcomb, Gary (1996) 

Assistant Professor of English 
Ph.D., Washington State University 
M.A., California State University 
B.A., California State University 

* Hollinger, Karen (1990) 

Associate Professor of English 
Ph.D., University of Illinois 
M.A., Loyola University 
B.A., Loyola University 

* Hollis, Selwyn L. (1991) 

Associate Professor of Mathematics 
Ph.D., North Carolina State University 
B.S., University of Georgia 

Hopkins, June (1998) 

Assistant Professor of History 
Ph.D., Georgetown University 
M.A., California State University-Northridge 
M.P.A., Pace University 
B.A., University of California-Berkeley 

Hopkinson, Caroline (1989) 

Assistant Professor of Library Science 
M.L.I.S., University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee 
B.A., University of Wisconsin-Madison 

* Howard, Thomas F. (1993) 

Assistant Professor of Geography 
Ph.D., University of California 
M.A., University of California 
M.A., University of Chicago 
B.A., University of Chicago 

Hyde, Linda (1995) 

Assistant Professor of Biology 
Ph.D., North Carolina State University 
B.A., University of Delaware 

♦Jamison, Carol P. (1993) 

Assistant Professor of English 
Ph.D., University of Georgia 
M.A., University of South Alabama 
B.A., University of Montevallo 



284 



ARMSTRONG ATLANTIC STATE UNIVERSITY 



Jaynes, Michael L. (1976) 

Assistant Professor of Physics 
M.S., University of North Carolina 
B.A., Appalachian State University 

Jensen, John G. (1985) 

Associate Professor of Art 
M.F.A., University of Arizona 
B.S., University of Wisconsin 

Jensen, Linda G. (1985) 

Associate Professor of Art 
M.F.A., Memphis State University 
M.A.T., Memphis State University 
B.A.E., University of Mississippi 

Jodis, Stephen (1990) 

Associate Professor of Computer Science 
Ph.D., Auburn University 
M.S., Auburn University 
B.C.P.E., Auburn University 

Johnson, Mark (1997) 

Assistant Professor of Music 
M.M., Louisiana State University 
B.M.E., Murray State University 

Jones, Dianne (1990) 

Assistant Professor of Mathematics 
M.Ed., William Carey College 
B.S., Mississippi State University 

Josi, Don (1996) 

Associate Professor of Criminal Justice 
Ph.D., University of California-Irvine 
M.A., California State University 
B.A., California State University 

Josten, Denice (1992) 

Assistant Professor of Reading 
Ph.D., Southern Illinois University 
M.M., Southern Illinois University 
B.M., Southern Illinois University 

Kearnes, John (1988) 

Associate Professor of Political Science 
Ph.D., University of Utah 
M.A., Andrews University 
B.A., Union College 

Keller, Carola (1970) 

Assistant Professor of Nursing 
M.S.N., Medical College of Georgia 
B.S.N., University of Virginia 

Kempke, Suzanne (1992) 

Assistant Professor of Biology 
M.S., University of Illinois 
M.A., Northwestern University 
A.B., University of Illinois 
B.S., University of Illinois 



Khan, Ritin (1992) 

Assistant Professor of Biology 
Ph.D., George Washington University 
M.A., American University 
B.S., University of Patna 

* Kilhefner, Dale Z. (1973) 
Professor of Mathematics 

Ph.D., Pennsylvania State University 
M.S., Purdue University 
M.Ed., Washington State University 
B.S., Elizabethtown College 

Knorr, Virginia W. (1973) 

Assistant Professor of Physical Education 
M.S., University of Tennessee-Knoxville 
B.S., University of Tennessee-Chattanooga 

Kolodny, Robert A. (1991) 

Associate Professor of Chemistry 
Ph.D., University of Georgia 
B.S., Queens College of New York 

Koth, Andreas W. (1991) 

Assistant Professor of Physical Education 
M.Ed., Georgia Southern College 
B.S., Georgia Southern College 

* Lake, David (1994) 

Head of Physical Therapy Department 
Professor of Physical Therapy 

Ph.D., Texas Tech University 

M.S., Indiana State University 

B.S., University of California 

Lamb, Deborah (1998) 

Instructor of Radiologic Sciences 
M.H.S., Armstrong Atlantic State University 
B.A., Armstrong State College 
A.S., Armstrong State College 

Lander, Jennifer (1994) 

Associate Professor of Physical Therapy 
Ed.D., Nova University 
M.S., Long Island University 
B.S., Indiana University 

Lane, Joseph M., Jr. (1970) 

Professor of Psychology 
Ph.D., University of Georgia 
M.S., University of Georgia 
B.S., University of Georgia 

Lariscy, Michael L. (1976) 

Head of Health and Physical Education 

Department 

Associate Professor of Physical Education 
Ed.D., University of Georgia 
M.Ed., Georgia Southern College 
B.S., Armstrong State College 



FACULTY 



285 



Larson, Brett A. (1991) 

Associate Professor of Biology 
Ph.D., University of Oregon 
B.S., University of Georgia 

Lee, Byung Moo (1981) 

Director of Library Services 
Assistant Professor of Library Science 

M.L.S., University of Wisconsin 

B.A., University of Wisconsin 

B.A., Yon Sei University 

* Lefavi, Robert (1993) 

Associate Professor of Health Science 
Ph.D., Auburn University 
M.B.A., Nova University 
B.S., University of Florida 

Leo, John (1996) 

Assistant Professor of Mathematics 
Ph.D., Louisiana State University 
M.S., Louisiana State University 
B.A., Whitman College 

Lesser, Lawrence (1999) 

Associate Professor of Mathematics 
Ph.D., University of Texas-Austin 
M.S., University of Texas-Austin 
B.A., Rice University 

Loyd, Robert (1997) 

Assistant Professor of Special Education 
Ph.D., University of Missouri-Columbia 
M.Ed., University of Missouri-Columbia 
B.S.Ed., University of Missouri-Columbia 

Lynch, Will E. (1993) 

Assistant Professor of Chemistry 
Ph.D., Wayne State University 
B.A., Kalamazoo College 

MacGowan, Catherine E. (1993) 

Assistant Professor of Chemistry 
Ph.D., University of Akron 
M.S., University of Colorado 
B.S., University of Michigan-Dearborn 

* Martin, Grace B. (1980) 

Interim Dean of Arts and Sciences 
Professor of Psychology 

Ph.D., Florida State University 

M.S., Florida State University 

B.A., Armstrong State College 

Martin, Keith W. (1992) 

Associate Professor of Engineering Studies 
Ph.D., Clemson University 
M.S., University of Georgia 
B.S., University of Georgia 



Martin, William B. (1980) 

Assistant Professor of English 
M.A., Duke University 
B.A., Armstrong State College 

Massey, Carole M. (1976) 

Associate Professor of Nursing 
Ed.D., University of Georgia 
M.S.N., Medical College of Georgia 
B.S.N., Medical College of Georgia 

McFadden, Cheryl (1997) 

Assistant Professor of Elementary Education 
Ed.D., Widener University 
M.A., Villanova University 
B.S., University of North Carolina 

McGrath, Richard (1997) 

Assistant Professor of Economics 
Ph.D., University of Virginia 
M.A., University of Virginia 
B.A., Framingham State College 

McMillan, Tim (1990) 

Assistant Professor of Mathematics 
Ph.D., University of Florida 
M.S., University of Florida 
B.S., University of South Carolina 

* Megathlin, William L. (1971) 

Dean of Academic and Enrollment Services 
Professor of Criminal Justice 

Ed.D., University of Georgia 

M.Ed., University of Georgia 

B.A., Presbyterian College 

Mellen, Peter J. (1993) 

Assistant Professor of Drama/Speech 
Ph.D., Bowling Green State University 
M.A., Bowling Green State University 
B.A., Bowling Green State University 

Mengle, Janice (1984) 

Assistant Professor of Dental Hygiene 
M.H.S., Armstrong State College 
B.S., Armstrong State College 

Meyer, Mary Louise (1997) 

Assistant Professor of Middle Grades Education 
M.S., Dowling College 
B.A., Christian Education 

Miller, Jill (1998) 

Assistant Professor of Art History 
Ph.D., University of Minnesota-Minneapolis 
M.A., University of Minnesota-Minneapolis 
B.A., Moorhead State University 



286 



ARMSTRONG ATLANTIC STATE UNIVERSITY 



Miller, Mary (1970) 

Associate Professor of Nursing 
Ed.D., University of Georgia 
M.S.N., Medical College of Georgia 
B.S.N., Medical College of Virginia 

Mincer, Andi Beth (1996) 

Assistant Professor of Physical Therapy 
M.S., Georgia State University 
B.S., University of Florida 
A.A., Pensacola Junior College 

Moore, Marsha S. (1996) 

Assistant Professor of Education 
M.Ed., Savannah State College and 

Armstrong State College 
B.A., Columbia College 

Munson, Richard E. (1972) 
Professor of Mathematics 

Ph.D., Rutgers University 

M.S., Rutgers University 

B.A., Houghton College 

* Murphy, Dennis D. (1981) 

Professor of Criminal Justice 
J.D., University of Florida 
Ph.D., University of Florida 
M.Ed., University of Florida 
B.A., University of Florida 

Neuman, Bonnie (1990) 

Associate Professor of Nursing 
Ph.D., Wayne State University 
M.S.N., Wayne State University 
B.S.N., University of Michigan 

* Newberry, S. Lloyd (1968) 

Dean of Education 

Professor of Education 
Ed.D., University of Georgia 
M.Ed., University of Georgia 
B.S.Ed., University of Georgia 

Nordenhaug, Erik (1995) 

Assistant Professor of Philosophy 
Ph.D., Emory University 
M.A., Emory University 
B.A., Mercer University 

* Nordquist, Richard F. (1980) 

Professor of English 
Ph.D., University of Georgia 
M.A., University of Leicester 
B.A., State University of New York 



Oglesby, Edward (1994) 

Assistant Professor of Mathematics 
M.Ed., Savannah State College 
B.S., Savannah State College 
B.A., Savannah State College 

* Palefsky, Elliot H. (1971) 

Professor of Psychology 
Ed.D., University of South Carolina 
Ed.S., Georgia Southern College 
Ed.M., Temple University 
B.S., University of Georgia 

Parham, Robert (1998) 

Head of Department of Languages, Literature, 
and Philosophy 
Professor of English 

Ph.D., Florida State University 

M.S., Florida State University 

B.A., Belmont College 

Paul, Chris (1999) 

Head of Department of Economics 

Professor of Economics 
Ph.D., Texas A&M University 
B.S., Southwest Missouri State University 

* Powell, Catharine L. (1991) 

Associate Professor of Nursing 
Ed.D., Indiana University 
M.S., University of North Carolina 
B.S.N., DePauw University 

* Price, Michael E. (1993) 

Assistant Professor of History 
Ed.D., University of Georgia 
M.A., University of Georgia 
B.A., Kansas State University 

Pruden, Ethel B. (1985) 

Assistant Professor of Nursing 
M.N., University of South Carolina 
B.S.N., State University of New York-Buffalo 

* Pruden, George B., Jr., (1982) 

Professor of History 
Ph.D., American University 
M.A., American University 
M.Ed., University of South Carolina 
B.A., Wake Forest 

Raines, Helon (1994) 

Associate Professor of English 
Ph.D., University of Denver 
M.A., University of Southern Mississippi 
B.S., Mississippi Southern College 



FACULTY 



287 



Reese, Deborah (1999) 

Assistant Professor of English 
M.A., The University of Texas-Arlington 
B.A., The University of Texas-Arlington 

Reese, Randall (1994) 

Assistant Professor of Music 
M.M., University of Michigan 
B.M.. Baldwin Wallace College Conservatory 

Reilly, Nancy E. (1990) 

Associate Professor of Nursing 
Ph.D., University of Michigan 
M.S., University of Michigan 
B.S.N.. Georgetown University 

Relyea, Kenneth (1990) 

Head of Biology Department 
Professor of Biology 

Ph.D., Tulane University 

M.S., Florida State University 

B.A., Florida State University 

Remler, Nancy (1992) 

Assistant Professor of English 
M.A., Georgia Southern University 
B.S.Ed., University of Georgia 

* Repella, James F. (1976) 

Dean of Health Professions 

Professor of Nursing 
Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh 
M.S.N., University of Pennsylvania 
B.S.Ed., Temple University 

* Rhee, Steve Y. (1974) 

Professor of Political Science 
Ph.D., University of Missouri 
M.A., University of Oregon 
B.A., University of Oregon 

Richardson, Edwin G. (1989) 

Assistant Professor of English 
M.A., University of Maine 
B.A., University of South Florida 

Rinalducci, Edward (1999) 

Assistant Professor of Sociology 
M.S., Mississippi State University 
B.S., Florida State University 

Roberts, Lynn T. (1989) 

Assistant Professor of Physical Education 
M.Ed.. Armstrong State College 
B.S.. Armstrong State College 

Robinson, Howard O. (1998) 

Assistant Professor of History 
Ph.D.. University of Akron 
M.A.. Alabama State University 
B.A., Alabama State Universit) 



Roby, Lisa (1999) 

Assistant Professor of Education 
M.Ed., Georgia College and State Universit) 
B.Ed., Mercer University 
A.Ed., Macon College 

Rodgers, Anne T.( 1985) 

Professor of Medical Technolog\ 
Ph.D.. University of Florida 
M.A.T., University of Massachusetts 
B.A., Ohio Wesleyan University 

Roesel, Rosalyn L. (1984) 

Professor of Nursing 
Ph.D., North Texas State Universit) 
M.S.N., Medical College of Georgia 
B.S.N., Medical College of Georgia 

Saadatmand, Yassaman (1989) 

Associate Professor of Economics 
Ph.D.. University of New Hampshire 
M.B.A.. James Madison University 
B.S., National Iranian Oil Company 
College of Finance 

Sajwan, Maria (1992) 

Assistant Professor of Library Sciences 
M.L.S.. University of Kentucky 
B.A., Colorado State University 

Schmidt, John C. (1979) 

Professor of Art 
M.F.A., Ohio Universit) 
B.F.A., Carnegie-Mellon Universit) 

Schollaert, Warren L. (1989) 

Associate Professor of Education 
Ed.D.. University of Georgia 
M.A., Roosevelt Universit) 
B.A., Arizona State University 

Schuberth, Christopher A. (1996) 

Assistant Professor of Science Education 
Director of Troops to Teachers Program 

M.S.. New York Universit) 

B.S.. City College of New York 

Schultz, Lucinda D. ( 1986) 

Professor of Musk 
D.M.A.. Universit\ of Colorado 
M.M., Colorado State Universit) 
B.S.. Dickinson State Colk 

Sconduto, Leslie (1995) 

Assistant Professor of French 
Ph.D.. Rutgers Universit) 
M. V. Rutgers Universit) 
B.A.. Augsburg College 



288 



ARMSTRONG ATLANTIC STATE UNIVERSITY 



Scott, Vann B., Jr. (1997) 

Assistant Professor of Psychology 
Ph.D., North Carolina State University 
M.A., Georgia Southern University 
A.B., University of North Carolina-Chapel 
Hill 

Shipley, Charles (1972) 

Professor of Computer Science 
Ph.D., University of Nebraska 
M.S., Georgia Institute of Technology 
M.A., University of Nebraska 
B.A., University of North Dakota 

Silcox, Elaine (1972) 
Assistant Professor of Nursing 

M.S.N., Medical College of Georgia 

M.Ed., University of Florida 

B.S.N., University of Florida 

* Simon, Emma T. (1974) 
Dean of Graduate Studies 
Professor of Health Science 

Ed.D., University of South Carolina 
M.H.E., Medical College of Georgia 
B.S., Armstrong State College 

Sisson, Michelle W. (1990) 

Assistant Professor of Education 
Ed.D., University of Georgia 
M.Ed., Armstrong State College 
B.S.Ed., University of Georgia 

* Skidmore-Hess, Daniel (1993) 

Assistant Professor of Political Science 
Ph.D., University of Wisconsin 
M.A., University of Wisconsin 
B.A., Oberlin College 

Smith, Carolyn G. (1977) 
Assistant Professor of Mathematics 

M.Ed., Armstrong State College 

B.S., Armstrong State College 

Smith, James (1990) 

Assistant Professor of English 
Ph.D., Vanderbilt University 
M.A., Vanderbilt University 
B.A., Berry College 

Smith, Thomas (1999) 

Assistant Professor of Biology 
Ph.D., State University of New York-Buffalo 
M.A., State University of New York-Buffalo 
B.S., State University of New York-Oswego 

Smith, William J., Jr. (1982) 

Assistant Professor of Respiratory Therapy 
M.H.S., Armstrong State College 
B.S., Medical University of South Carolina 



Stegall, John L. (1981) 

Vice President for Business and Finance 
M.B.A., University of Georgia 
B.S., Indiana State University 

* Stern, Camille P. (1991) 

Professor of Nursing 
Ph.D., University of Texas 
M.S.N., University of Alabama 
B.S., Medical College of Georgia 

* Stone, Janet D. (1975) 
Associate Professor of History 

Ph.D., Emory University 
M.A., Purdue University 
A.B., Randolph-Macon Woman's College 

* Strauser, Edward B. (1991) 

Associate Professor of Education 
Ed.D., State University of New York 
M.S., Canisius College 
B.S., State University of New York 

* Streater, James, Jr. (1988) 

Head of Health Science Department 

Professor of Health Science 
Ed.D., University of South Carolina 
M.Ed., University of South Carolina 
B.A., University of South Carolina 

Strickland, Gloria (1997) 

Assistant Professor of Radiologic Technologies 
M.H.S., Armstrong Atlantic State 

University 
B.S., Thomas Edison State College 
A.S., Thomas Edison State College 

Stubbs, Barbara (1997) 

Assistant Professor of Dental Hygiene 
M.S., University of North Carolina- 
Chapel Hill 
B.S., Columbus State University 
A.S., Columbus State University 

Taggart, Helen M. (1992) 

Assistant Professor of Nursing 
M.S.N., Georgia Southern University 
B.S.N., Armstrong State College 

* Tanenbaum, Barbara G. (1972) 
Head of Dental Hygiene Department 
Professor of Dental Hygiene 

Ed.D., University of Georgia 
M.Ed., Armstrong State College 
B.S., Medical College of Georgia 

Taylor, Stephen A. (1992) 

Associate Professor of Psychology 
Ph.D., University of Florida 
B.A., Oswega State College 



FACULTY 



289 



Thompson, Anne W. (1994) 

Assistant Professor of Physical Therapy 
Ed.D., Georgia Southern University 
M.S., Duke University 
B.S., College of William and Mary 

Thorne, Francis M. (1965) 

Professor of Biology 
Ph.D., University of Georgia 
B.S., Stetson University 

* Tilson, Elwin R. (1982) 
Professor of Radiologic Technologies 

Ed.D., University of Georgia 

M.S., San Francisco State University 

B.S., Arizona State University 

Todesca, James (1998) 

Assistant Professor of History 
Ph.D., Fordham University 
M.A., Catholic University of America 
B.A., Georgetown University 

Toma, Michael (1997) 

Assistant Professor of Economics 
Ph.D., George Mason University 
M.A., Miami University-Oxford 
B.S., Miami University-Oxford 

* Townsend, Dabney (1997) 

Professor of Philosophy 
Ph.D., Emory University 
B.D., Drew University 
B.S., Duke University 

Tucker, Debbie A. (1995) 

Assistant Professor of Physical Therapy 
M.D., Medical College of Georgia 
B.S., Medical College of Georgia 

Wallace, Richard (1995) 

Associate Professor of Chemistry 
Ph.D., Clemson University 
B.S., Armstrong State College 

Walworth, Margaret E. (1991) 

Assistant Professor of Education 
Ph.D., University of Georgia 
M.Ed., Clemson University 
B.S., Clemson University 

Wambold, Constance A. (1993) 

Assistant Professor of Special Education 
M.S., Towson State University 
B.A., Molloy College 

Weiner, Steven (1995) 

Assistant Professor of Chemistry 
Ph.D., Brown University 
B.A., Brandeis University 



Welsh, John A., 111(1967) 

Assistant Professor of English 
M.A., Vanderbilt University 
B.A., Davidson College 

* Wheeler, Ed R. (1987) 

Head of Mathematics Department 
Professor of Mathematics 

Ph.D., University of Virginia 

B.A., Samford University 

White, Laurie (1989) 

Associate Professor of Computer Science 
Ph.D., University of Florida 
M.S., University of Florida 
B.A., University of Virginia 

White, Nancy A. (1994) 

Head of History Department 
Professor of History 

Ph.D., American University 

M.A., American University 

B.A., Mount Holyoke College 

White, Susan S. (1972) 

Assistant Professor of Education 
M.Ed., University of South Carolina 
B.S., Winthrop College 

* Whiten, Morris L. (1970) 

Professor of Physics 
Ph.D., University of Georgia 
B.S., University of Georgia 

Williams, Ronald R. (1998) 

Head of Chemistry and Physics Department 

Professor of Chemistry 
Ph.D., University of Georgia 
B.S., University of South Carolina 

Williamson, Jane B. (1976) 

Assistant Professor of Nursing 
M.S.N., Medical College of Georgia 
M.Ed., Georgia Southern College 
B.S.N., University of Georgia 

Wimer, Gregory (1994) 

Assistant Professor of Physical Education 
Ph.D., Ohio State University 
M.S., University of South Carolina 
B.S., University of South Carolina 

* Winterhalter, Teresa (1994) 

Assistant Professor of English 
Ph.D., University of Rochester 
M.A., University of Rochester 
M.A., State University of New York-Cortland 
B.A., State University of New York-Brockport 



290 



ARMSTRONG ATLANTIC STATE UNIVERSITY 



Worley, Milton (1996) 

Assistant Professor of Middle Grades 
Education 

Ed.D., Oklahoma State University 

M.Ed., Phillips University 

B.S., Phillips University 

* Wright, Linda (1994) 

Professor of Health Science 
Ph.D., Texas Tech University 
B.S., Eastern New Mexico University 

Wynn, Gail G. (1992) 

Assistant Professor of Biology 
Ph.D., Louisiana State University 
M.S., Louisiana State University 
B.S., Oglethorpe University 

* Yentsch, Anne (1992) 

Associate Professor of Historical Archaeology 
Ph.D., Brown University 
M.A., Brown University 
M.A., University of Miami (Florida) 



Young, Sue (1998) 

Head of Department of Nursing 
Professor of Nursing 

Ph.D., Old Dominion University 

M.S.N., The Catholic University of America 

B.S.N., University of Alabama 

Zipperer, Freya M.J. (1996) 

Assistant Professor of Secondary Education 
Ed.D., University of Georgia 
M.Ed., University of Georgia 
B.A., Armstrong State College 

Zipperer, William C. (1991) 

Associate Professor of Chemistry 
Ph.D., University of Georgia 
B.S., University of Georgia 



FACULTY 



291 



Emeriti Faculty 



Adams, Joseph V. (1970-1997) 

Professor of Psychology and Dean of Arts and 
Sciences Emeritus 

Anderson, Donald D. (1966-1992) 

Dean of Community Services and Registrar 
Emeritus 

Beecher, Orson (1942-1982) 

Professor of History Emeritus 

Brewer, John G. (1968-1998) 

Professor of Chemistry Emeritus 

Brooks, Sammy Kent (1966-1990) 

Professor of English Emeritus 

Brower, Moonyean (1967-1995) 

Associate Professor of Biology Emerita 

Comaskey, Bernard (1966-1997) 

Assistant Professor of History Emeritus 

Davenport, Leslie B., Jr. (1958-1983) 

Professor of Biology Emeritus 

Davis, Lamar W. 

Professor of Business Administration Emeritus 

Duncan, John (1965-1997) 

Professor of History Emeritus 

Findeis, John (1968-1995) 

Assistant Professor of Mathematics Emeritus 

Gadsden, Ida (1956-1981) 

Professor of Education Emerita 

Gross, Jimmie (1967-1997) 

Professor of History Emeritus 

Harmond, Thelma (1963-1981) 

Professor of Education Emerita 

Hudson, Anne (1971-1997) 

Professor of Mathematics Emerita 

Hudson, Sigmund (1985-1997) 

Professor of Computer Science Emeritus 

Jenkins, Marvin (1968-1997) 

Assistant Professor of English Emeritus 

Killorin, Joseph I. (1947-1988) 

Professor of Philosophy & Literature Emeritus 

Lanier, Osmos (1965-1997) 

Professor of History Emeritus 



Lawson, Cornelia (1972-1987) 
Professor of Education Emerita 

Magnus, Robert E. (1973-1991) 

Professor of Criminal Justice Emeritus 

McCarthy, John C. (1962-1990) 

Professor of Political Science Emeritus 

McClanahan, Billie F. (1981-1989) 

Assistant Professor of English Emerita 

Patterson, Robert (1966-1998) 

Professor of History Emeritus 

Pendexter, Hugh III (1965-1983) 

Professor of English Emeritus 

Pingel, Allen L. (1969-1992) 

Professor of Biology Emeritus 

Propst, H. Dean (1969-1979) 

Professor of English and Vice President and 
Dean of Faculty Emeritus 

Robbins, Paul (1966-1986) 

Professor of Chemistry Emeritus 

Robinson, Aurella (1972-1986) 

Associate Professor of Education Emerita 

Sartor, Herman (1964-1981) 

Professor of Education Emeritus 

Sims, Roy Jesse (1955-1990) 

Professor of Physical Education Emeritus 

Stephens, Jacquelyn (1979-1990) 

Professor of Education Emerita 

Stratton, Cedric (1965-1993) 

Professor of Chemistry Emeritus 

Strozier, Robert (1955-1959; 1965-1995) 

Professor of English Emeritus 

Tapp, Lawrence (1959-1994) 

Professor of Physical Education Emeritus 

White, Virginia (1967-1991) 

Assistant Professor of English Emerita 

Winn, William (1957-1971) 

Professor of Mathematics Emeritus 

Worthington, Clarke Stuart (1967-1993) 

Professor of Psychology Emeritus 



292 ARMSTRONG ATLANTIC STATE UNIVERSITY 



Officers of Administration at Armstrong Atlantic State University 

Dr. Frank A. Butler Interim President 

Dr. Sara E. Connor Interim Vice President 

Mr. John L. Stegall Vice President for Business and Finance 

Dr. Joseph A. Buck Vice President for Student Affairs 

Dr. F. Douglas Moore Vice President for University Advancement 

Dr. William L. Megathlin Dean, Academic and Enrollment Services 

Dr. Emma T. Simon Dean, School of Graduate Studies 

Dr. Grace Martin Interim Dean, College of Arts and Sciences 

Dr. S. Lloyd Newberry Dean, College of Education 

Dr. James Repella Dean, College of Health Professions 

Vacant Assistant Vice President for Academic Affairs 

Vacant Assistant Vice President for Technology 

Dr. Deanna Cross Assistant Dean, Adult Academic Services and 

Special Assistant to the President for Minority Affairs 

Dr. Henry Harris Associate Dean, College of Arts and Sciences 

Dr. Patricia Brandt Assistant Dean, College of Education 

Dr. Marilyn Buck Assistant Dean, College of Health Professions 

Mr. William Kelso Assistant to the Vice President for Student Affairs 

Dr. Joseph Adams Special Assistant to the Vice President for International Programming 

Mr. Ben Lee Director, Lane Library 

Mr. Kim West Registrar and Director of Admissions 

Mr. Greg Anderson Director, Academic Orientation and Advisement 

Ms. Melinda Thomas Director, Alumni Affairs and Annual Fund 

Dr. Eddie Aenchbacher Director, Athletics 

Ms. JoAnn Windeler Director, Business and Auxiliary Services 

Ms. Jan Jones Director, Career Services 

Dr. Lucretia Zienert Director, Computer and Information Services 

Vacant Director, Continuing Education 

Ms. Lynn Benson Director, Counseling Services 

Mr. Greg Sewell Director, Law Enforcement Training Center 

Mr. Tim Parrish Director, Development 

Vacant Director, Disability Services 

Ms. Katie Brooks Director, Elderhostel 

Mr. Brad Burnett Director, Financial Aid 

Mr. Daniel Harrell Director, Financial Services 

Dr. Richard Nordquist Director, General Studies 

Ms. Alexandra Thompson Director, Grants 

Dr. Mark Finlay Director, Honors Program 

Ms. Ellen Struck Director, Human Resources 

Ms. Cheryl Tarter Director, Institutional Research 

Mr. Gary Guillory Director, International Student Services 

Ms. Gisela Grant Director, Liberty Center 

Ms. Lauretta Hannon Executive Director, Marketing 

Dr. Michael Snowden Director, Minority Affairs 

Mr. David Faircloth Director, Plant Operations 

Mr. Mack Seckinger Director, Public Safety 

Ms. Mary Willoughby Director, Public Service Center 

Mr. Al Harris Director, Student Activities 

Vacant Director, Volunteer and Service Learning 

Vacant Director, Weekend and Off-Campus Programs 



UNIVERSITY SYSTEM OF GEORGIA 293 

University System of Georgia Organization 

Board of Regents 

David Averitt First 

John Hunt Second 

Vacant Third 

Juanita Powell Baranco Fourth 

Elridge W. McMillan Fifth 

Kenneth W. Cannestra Sixth 

Edgar L. Rhodes Seventh 

S. William Clark, Jr., MD, Vice Chair Eighth 

Edgar L. Jenkins, Chair Ninth 

Thomas F. Allgood, Sr Tenth 

Glenn White Eleventh 

J. Tom Coleman, Jr State at Large 

Hilton H. Howell, Jr State at Large 

Warren Y. Jobe State at Large 

Charles H. Jones State at Large 

Donald M. Leebern, Jr State at Large 



Board of Regents Staff 

Stephen R. Portch Chancellor 

Lindsay A. Desrochers Senior Vice Chancellor for Capital Resources/Treasurer 

Arthur N. Dunning Senior Vice Chancellor for Human and External Resources 

James L. Muyskens Senior Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs 

William K. Chatham Vice Chancellor - Facilities 

Thomas E. Daniel Vice Chancellor - External Affairs 

Barry A. Fullerton Vice Chancellor - Student Services 

E. Michael Staman Vice Chancellor - Information/Instructional Technology/CIO 

William R. Bowes Associate Vice Chancellor - Fiscal Affairs 

T. Don Davis Associate Vice Chancellor - Human Resources 

Cathie M. Hudson Associate Vice Chancellor - Planning and Policy Analysis 

Elizabeth Neely Associate Vice Chancellor - Legal Affairs 



University System of Georgia 

270 Washington Street, SW 

Atlanta, GA 30334 



294 



ARMSTRONG ATLANTIC STATE UNIVERSITY 



Institutions of the University System of Georgia 



Comprehensive and Special Purpose Universities 

Athens 30602 

University of Georgia — h; B,J,M,S,D 
Atlanta 30332 

Georgia Institute of Technology — h; B,M,D 



Atlanta 30303 

Georgia State University— A,BJ,M,S,D 
Augusta 30912 

Medical College of Georgia— h; A,B,M,D 



Regional Universities 

Statesboro 30460 Valdosta 3 1698 

Georgia Southern University — h; A,B,M,S,cD Valdosta State University — h; A,B,M,S,cD 



State Universities and Senior Colleges 



Albany 31705 

Albany State University — h; B,M 
Americus 31709 

Georgia Southwestern State University — h; A,BMS 
Augusta 30910 

Augusta State University — A,B,M,S 
Carrollton 30118 

State University of West Georgia — h; A,B,M,S 
Columbus 31993 

Columbus State University — A,B,M,S 
Dahlonega 30597 

North Georgia College and State University — h; A,B,M 
Fort Valley 31030 

Fort Valley State University — h; A,B,M 



Marietta 30061 

Kennesaw State University — A,B 
Marietta 30060 

Southern Polytechnic State University — h; AJ$M 
Milledgeville 31061 

Georgia College and State University — h; A,B,M,S 
Morrow 30260 

Clayton College and State University — A,B 
Savannah 31419 

Armstrong Atlantic State University — h; A,B,M 
Savannah 31404 

Savannah State University — h; A,B,M 



Albany 31707 

Darton College — A 
Atlanta 30310 

Atlanta Metropolitan College — A 
Bainbridge 31717 

Bainbridge College — A 
Barnesville 30204 

Gordon College — h; A 
Brunswick 31523 

Coastal Georgia Community College- 
Cochran 31014 

Middle Georgia College — h; A 
Dalton 30720 

Dalton College — A 
Decatur 30034 

Dekalb College— A 



Two- Year Colleges 

Douglas 31533 



South Georgia College — h; A 
Gainesville 30503 

Gainesville College — A 
Macon 31297 

Macon College — A 
Rome 30163 

Floyd College — A 
Swainsboro 30401 

East Georgia College — A 
Tifton 31793 

Abraham Baldwin Agri. College — h; A 
Waycross 31501 

Waycross College — A 



h — On-Campus Student Housing Facilities. Degrees Awarded: A — Associate; B — Baccalaureate; 

J — Juris Doctor; M — Masters; S — Specialist in Education; D — Doctorate; 

cD — Doctorate offered in cooperation with a University System university, 

with degree awarded by the university. 



GLOSSARY 295 



GLOSSARY OF TERMS 

academic advisement: a process which assists students in clarifying their educational, career, and 
life goals. Faculty and staff advisors help students develop goals, plan all academic course work 
and other educational experiences. Students are required to meet with academic advisors at least 
once every semester but are encouraged to visit more often. 

academic probation: a status that indicates a student is not maintaining the required minimum 
GPA. The first time a student falls below the required GPA he or she is placed on good standing 
with warning. Failure to raise the adjusted GPA to the required level during the next term will 
result in academic probation. 

academic suspension: status given to students on academic probation who neither achieve the 
required adjusted GPA nor earn at least a 2.0 grade point average during the probationary period. 
Such students will need to appeal to continue attending the university. 

advanced placement: eligibility to enroll in courses beyond the entry level through transfer credit 
or examination. 

accredited: a designation that an institution has been evaluated and met criteria set by an 
independent oversight agency. For example, the Commission on Colleges of the Southern 
Association of Colleges and Schools rules on accreditation for Armstrong Atlantic State 
University. 

ACT — American College Testing: a standardized exam that tests verbal and math skills. 

add (a class): students may sign up for another class after their initial registration. 

adjusted GPA: the total honor points earned divided by the total hours attempted, with hours and 
honors points for repeated courses not duplicated in the calculation (see GPA). Includes transfer 
hours credited to the student's course of study at Armstrong Atlantic. 

advance registration: an early registration period available to currently enrolled students. Also 
known as pre-registration. 

area of concentration: a part of the course of study required for the bachelor of general studies 
degree; any minor approved by the Board of Regents may be chosen. 

associate of arts (AA) or associate of science (AS) degree program: two years (full-time) of 
study that completes a student's core curriculum requirements. 

associate of applied science (AAS) degree program: two years (full-time) of study in a specific 
discipline. 

auditing: attending a class without receiving credit. Students must be enrolled, receive permis- 
sion from the instructor, declare audit status at the time of registration, and pay the tuition and fees 
for the class. 

baccalaureate: a program of study lasting four years (full-time) consisting of two years of core 
curriculum and two years of courses in an area of specialization or major (see bachelor of arts/ 
bachelor of science degree programs). 

bachelor of arts (BA) or bachelor of science (BS) degree program: four years ( lull-time) o\~ 
study consisting of two years of core curriculum and two years of courses in an area of 
specialization or major, also referred to as a bachelor's or baccalaureate degree. 

Board of Regents: the governing board of the University System of Georgia. 

certificate programs: a course of study, shorter than a degree, leading to certification in a specific 

field. May be on a pre-or post-baccalaureate level, depending on field. 

CHAOS (Communication, Help, Advisement, Orientation and Service): an orientation 
program held for new students. CHAOS leaders are students who have been trained to present 
these orientation sessions. 

challenge exams: available only for specific courses, usuall) for students w ho have experience 
in a specific field. Students passing this type of exam would be exempt from certain classes 



296 ARMSTRONG ATLANTIC STATE UNIVERSITY 

classification: a term based on the number of credit hours earned to classify a student at the 
freshman, sophomore, junior or senior level. 

CLEP — College Level Examination Program: a standardized test used to determine profi- 
ciency in a specific area of study. If students score at a certain level on a CLEP test, they will 
receive credit for a class in that subject area. In some areas, students will be required to pass a 
higher level course with a minium grade before CLEP credit is given. 

CPC — College Preparatory Curriculum: a high school course of study required of all students 
graduating from high school within the past five years. Course requirements include English, 
math, science, social sciences, and foreign languages. CPC requirements apply to students with 
a GED who would have graduated within the same time frame. 

CPE — College Placement Exam: establishes students' proficiency levels in reading, English 
and math. Based on the scores received, students may be required to take learning support courses. 
This exam is given to students before their first semester. 

core curriculum: a broad course of study required of all students pursuing a bachelor's degree. 
Courses come from the areas of the humanities, social sciences, math, and natural sciences for a 
total of 60 semester hours. 

Dean's List: an announcement at the end of each semester listing those students enrolled for at 
least 1 semester hours who have earned at least a 3.6 honor point average. Only course work taken 
at Armstrong Atlantic will be used in the computation of Dean's List honors. 

delayed admission: admission status of students who have not attended high school or college 
within the last five years and have earned fewer than 20 transferable credits. These applicants are 
not required to take the SAT or ACT, but will take the CPE. 

drop (a class): students deciding to withdraw from a class or classes must follow an established 
procedure in order to obtain any refunds due to them and avoid academic penalties. See also 
withdrawal. 

early admission: a program for high school students who have not completed the eleventh grade, 
but who have demonstrated outstanding academic potential. 

elective: a course which is related to the courses in a major or which counts as general credit 
toward a degree. 

exit exams: exams given by a department to graduating seniors to determine minimum levels of 
competency in the major subject area. 

freshman: student who has earned fewer than 30 semester hours. 

freshman index: computed using SAT scores and the high school grade point average only on 
CPC units required for admission. 

full-time: students taking 12 or more semester hours of classes. 

GED — General Education Development: an equivalent to the high school diploma; students 
must submit official GED scores for admission. 

good standing: a status that indicates students are maintaining the required minimum GPA. 

good standing with warning: status given to students whose GPA falls below the required GPA 
for the first time. 

GPA — grade point average: a point system used to determine the average of all grades a student 
has received for one term or for an entire college career. To determine GPA, honor points awarded 
based on each grade received are totaled then divided by the number of hours attempted. 

graduate work: refers to any studies done toward a master's or doctoral degree. 
GRE — Graduate Record Exam: standardized exams that test verbal, quantitative, and 
analytical skills, usually used as part of the admissions process for graduate school. GRE subject 
exams are also available, and sometimes used for graduate admissions. 



GLOSSARY 297 



GTREP — Georgia Tech Regional Engineering Program: students in the Savannah area may 
obtain all courses needed, either in traditional classes or by distance learning, for Georgia Tech 
degrees in computer and civil engineering. 

honor points: the points earned based on the letter grade and semester hours credited for a course. 
Used to determine GPA. 

independent study: classes that permit students to pursue individual research and reading in their 
major field. Permission from the department head or the professor is required. 

in-state tuition: rate of tuition paid by Georgia residents. 

internship: work in a firm or agency related to a student's major program and/or career plans. 

intramurals: organized competitive sports activities coordinated though the Department of 
Health and Physical Education. Open to all interested students. 

joint enrollment: a program for high school students who have completed the tenth grade and 
have demonstrated outstanding academic potential. This program allows students to enroll full- 
time at the university while remaining on the rolls of a local high school. At the end of their 
freshman year students receive their high school diploma. 

junior: student who has earned between 60 and 89 semester hours. 

major: an area of concentrated study in a degree program approved by the Board of Regents. For 
a major program, a department will require 60 semester hours of specific courses or approved 
elective courses in related fields. 

master's (MA, MS, MEd, MPH, etc.) degree program: two years (full-time) of study in a 
specific area of specialization. This degree is attempted after a bachelor's degree and may require 
an in-depth research paper or thesis for completion of the degree. 

minor: an optional course of study chosen in addition to a major consisting of 15-18 specified 
semester hours in an area of study different from the student's major. Minors are approved by the 
Board of Regents. 

out-of-state tuition: rate of tuition paid by students who are not legal residents of Georgia. 

part-time: students taking fewer than 12 semester hours of classes. 

portfolio: a collection of work (e.g., paintings, writings, etc.) which may be used to demonstrate 
competency in an academic area. 

pre-professional programs: courses appropriate for the first two years of baccalaureate pro- 
grams not offered among degree programs here at the university, such as business, engineering, 
forestry, and pharmacy. Also includes study appropriate for dentistry, law, medicine, veterinary 
medicine and other professional fields. 

pre-registration: an early registration period available to currently enrolled students. Also 
known as advance registration. 

prerequisite: a course required before a more advanced course may be taken. Prerequisites are 
listed in the catalog under course descriptions. 

programs of study: refers to specific majors or areas of study, usually leading to a degree. 

readmission: students who have attended Armstrong Atlantic in the past, but have not taken 
classes at the university for three or more terms, not including the summer term. 

Regents' Test: an exam measuring minimum writing and reading skills given to all students in 
the University System of Georgia. At Armstrong Atlantic, this exam is required after a student has 
completed 30 semester hours. 

registration: a time to enroll for specific classes for the upcoming term. Regular registration is 
held the day before classes begin each term. 



298 ARMSTRONG ATLANTIC STATE UNIVERSITY 



regular admission: admission status for students who, upon entrance to the university, have the 
required standardized test scores (SAT verbal 460/SAT math 430 or ACT English 20/ ACT math 
18), required grade point average (2.0), have completed the required college prep curriculum (see 
CPC), and have not been out of high school more than four years. This status will be awarded to 
other students upon completing 18 hours of credit with a 2.0 grade point average. 

residency: students are considered residents of Georgia if they have lived in Georgia at least one 
year and consider Georgia their home. Students who have not lived in Georgia for one year or who 
are just coming to Georgia for their education and plan to move back to another state after 
graduation are not considered residents. 

RETP — Regents Engineering Transfer Program: students transfer to Georgia Tech in Atlanta 
after successfully completing a two-year pre-engineering curriculum at Armstrong Atlantic. 

ROTC — Reserve Officer Training Corps: a curriculum available at Armstrong Atlantic and 
Savannah State that qualifies students for commissions as officers in the US Army, Army 
Reserves, US Navy, Naval Reserves or US National Guard after graduation. 

SAT — Scholastic Aptitude Test: a standardized exam that tests verbal and math skills. Scores 
are used to determine admission status for freshmen. 

semester hours: the approximate number of hours spent each week in a particular class. Also used 
to determine the total number of hours students register for. 

semester system: a school term based on approximately 1 5 weeks, including two regular sessions 
each year plus a shorter summer session. 

senior: student who has earned 90 or more semester hours. 

short course: a continuing education course that does not award college credit though it may 
award continuing education units. 

sophomore: student who has earned between 30 and 59 semester hours. 

transcript: an official record of all courses taken at a particular institution. An official transcript 
is a transcript sent directly from one institution to another; a student copy is a transcript issued to 
students. 

transfer: students seeking admission who have previously been enrolled at another institution of 
higher education. 

transfer credit: credit for courses taken at another institution. Granting credit will be considered 
only for course work from an accredited institution. 

transient: admission status of students currently enrolled at another institution applying for 
temporary admission to Armstrong Atlantic for one term. Students must be in good standing at 
their home institution, and have written permission from their dean or registrar to take specific 
courses at Armstrong Atlantic which may be transferred to their home institution. 

University System of Georgia: the overall system of public higher education in Georgia, 
comprised of 5 universities, 14 senior colleges and 15 junior colleges. 

withdrawal: the act of dropping out of the university completely; the date of the withdrawal 
determines any fee refund or grade penalty. 



INDEX 



299 



INDEX 



AASU Foundation 15 

academic advisement 40, 45 

academic progress 

required to continue enrollment 22 

required to retain aid 37, 38, 39 

academic renewal 45 

academic standing 45 

transfer applicants 22 

accreditations 10 

administrative officers 292 

admission 16 

(see also Colleges and Departments) 

decisions 27 

delayed 19 

early 19 

graduate 26, 66 

GTREP 26 

health professions 27, 128 

honors 25 

international 19 

joint enrollment 20 

limited 18 

non-degree seeking 20 

outstanding student 21 

postsecondary options 21 

readmission 21 

regents engineering transfer 25 

regular 17 

requirements 16 

Sixty-Two Plus 26 

SOCAD 26 

teacher education 27, 113 

transfer 21 

transient 16 

veteran 26 

vocational rehabilitation 26 

adult academic services 40 

alcohol and drug education 40 

alternative teacher preparation program 1 12 

alumni affairs 15 

alumni association 15 

application fee 29 

Army ROTC 274 

Art, Music, and Theatre, Department of 70 

Arts and Sciences, College of 67 

athletics 43 

attendance, class 46 

auditing 46 

baccalaureate degree 63 

basic law enforcement certificate program .. 273 

Biology, Department of 76 

Brunswick Center 12, 24 



calendar inside front cover 

career services 41 

catalog 55 

use of 8 

graduate 66 

certificate programs 24 

CHAOS 43 

Chemistry and Physics, Department of 80 

classification of students 47 

clubs, student 43 

college preparatory curriculum 17 

college placement examination 17 

computer center, academic 40 

Computer Science, Department of 84 

constitution, Georgia and U.S. 

requirement 56, 63 

continuing education 13 

cooperative education program 12 

core curriculum requirements 57 

counseling services 41 

course descriptions 156 

course index 154 

course credit 55 

by examination 23 

for military service 24 

transfer 22 

courses 

auditing 46 

dropping courses 47 

lettering system 154 

load per term 46 

numbering system 154 

overloads 50 

repeating courses 56 

CPC 

deficiencies 17 

requirements 17 

CPR certification requirement 

College of Education 114, 115 

College of Health Professions 
(see departments) 
Criminal Justice, Social and Political 

Science, Department of 86 

Criminal Justice Training Center 13 

cross-enrollment (AASU-SSU) 1 1 

Dean's list 49 

degree programs 11,63 

(see also departmental listings ) 

cooperative 12 

dual-degree 12 

graduate 66 

pre-professional 1 1 

degree requirements 55 

degrees available, chart of 6 



300 



ARMSTRONG ATLANTIC STATE UNIVERSITY 



Dental Hygiene, Department of 128 

development, university 15 

difference checks 32 

disability services 41 

dismissal (academic) 45 

distance learning 12 

dormitory 29, 40 

double major 56 

library media 118 

dropping course 47 

dual degree programs 12 

Early Childhood Education, Department of .... 116 

Economics, Department of 93 

Education, College of 1 1 1 

Elderhostel 14 

engineering 81 

Georgia Tech Regional Program 11 

Regents Transfer Program 11 

English core requirements 98 

English placement 47, 98, 1 87 

evening programs 1 1 

exit examinations 56 

faculty roster 279 

emeriti roster 291 

fees and expenses 28 

application 29 

continuing education 30 

dental hygiene 30 

graduation 30 

medical technology 30 

music 30 

payment methods 31 

off-campus 32 

physical therapy 30 

radiologic sciences 30 

refund schedule 30 

residence hall 29 

student teacher/internship 30 

waiver 29 

financial aid 34 

application 34 

deadlines 35 

disbursement 35 

grants 36 

HOPE 36 

loans 37 

PROMISE (for teachers) 37 

qualifications 34 

scholarship 36 

veterans benefits 38 

work-study 36 

first aid certification requirement 

College of Education 114, 115 

College of Health Professions 
(see departments) 



food service 29 

general education outcomes 56 

General Studies Program 68 

Georgia history and constitution 

requirement 56, 63 

gerontology certificate 133 

glossary 295 

grades 

appeals 47 

incompletes 49 

symbols 49 

grade point average, calculation of 49 

grading system 48 

Graduate Studies, School of 66 

graduation 

application 55, 115 

attendance 55 

fees 30 

honors 49 

requirements 55, 56 

grants (financial aid) 36 

GSAMS 12 

GTREP 11, 26 

Health and Physical Education, 

Department of 1 19 

Health Professions, College of 127 

Health Science, Department of 132 

History, Department of 95 

history /constitution state requirement 56, 63 

history of the university 9 

honor code 50 

honor societies 42 

honors 49 

honors program 54 

admission 25 

HOPE scholarship 36 

continuing 37 

qualifications 36 

regaining 37 

teachers 37 

housing 29 

incomplete grades 49 

insurance requirements 

College of Education students 115 

College of Health Professions students ..128 

intercollegiate athletics 43 

international students 19 

internships (see Course Descriptions) 

in lieu of student teaching 114 

intramurals 43 

Lane Library 41 

Languages, Literature, and Philosophy, 

Department of 98 

law enforcement, basic certificate in 273 

Learning Support 272 



INDEX 



301 



Liberty Center 13 

library/media program 116 

library services 41 

loans 37 

health fields 37 

teacher training 37 

Mathematics, Department of 105 

mathematics placement 47, 212 

math tutorial center 42 

meal plan 40 

Medical Technology, Department of 136 

Middle Grades and Secondary Education 

Department of 121 

military experience, credit for 24 

Military Science Program (ROTC) 274 

minority advisement 42 

minors 

{see also departmental listings) 

arts and sciences 68 

education 115 

library/media 116 

military science 276 

naval science 277 

mission statement 9 

educational outcomes 56 

Naval Science Program (ROTC) 277 

Nursing, Department of 139 

off-campus programs 12 

{see also Brunswick and Liberty Centers) 

organizations, student 40 

orientation 43 

overloads 50 

parking 42 

payment methods 31 

physical education requirements 56 

Physical Therapy, Department of 143 

pre-physical therapy options 79, 136, 144 

placement 

pre-professional programs 11 

probation (academic) 45 

PROMISE teacher scholarship 37 

Psychology, Department of 108 

publications, student 44 

public service center 13 

Radiologic Sciences, Department of 148 

reading lab 42 

readmission 21 

refunds 30 

Regents' engineering transfer program .... 1 1, 25 
Regents' testing program 61 



Regional Criminal Justice Training Center.... 13 

remediation, Regent's 61 

repeating courses 56 

residence hall fees 29 

residency 28 

petition for reclassification 29 

requirements 28 

Respiratory Therapy, Department of 150 

returned checks, penalties for 31 

SACS accreditation 10 

Savannah, as location of university 14 

scholarships 36 

SOCAD 26 

Special Education, Department of 125 

student 

court 50, 52 

government 44 

loans 37 

teaching 114 

study abroad programs 272 

suspension (academic) 45 

teacher education 

admissions 27, 113 

loans 37 

programs Ill 

tests and testing 42 

collegiate placement examination 17, 18 

credit by examination 23 

placement tests 17, 18 

Regents' Test 61 

TOEFL 20 

transfer 

admission 21 

credit 22 

requirements 23 

transient students 46 

tuition 28 

university advancement 14 

university relations 14 

veterans 

admissions 26 

financial aid 38 

services 42 

vocational rehabilitation 26 

weekend classes 1 1 

where to write or call inside back cover 

withdrawal, involuntary 50 

withdrawing from the university 50 

work-study 36 

writing center 42 



Vhere to Write or Call 

jecific information may be obtained by writing to the offices listed below and adding: Armstrong 
lantic State University, 1 1935 Abercorn Street, Savannah. GA 31419-1997. Also see our web 
\e at www.armstrong.edu. 



xCADEMIC ADVISEMENT 
)irector of Academic Orientation 

and Advisement 
;21-5494 

ADMISSION 

Director of Admissions 

927-5277 

1-800-633-2349 

ADULT ACADEMIC SERVICES 

Assistant Dean of Adult Academic Services 

961-3163 

ALUMNI 

Alumni Affairs, Office of University 

Advancement 
927-5264 

ATHLETICS 
Director of Athletics 
927-5336 

BUSINESS MATTERS 

Vice President for Business & Finance 

927-5255 

CAREER PLANNING & PLACEMENT 
Director of Career Services 
927-5269 

CONTINUING EDUCATION 
Director of Continuing Education 
927-5322 

COUNSELING 

Director of Counseling 
927-5269 

FINANCIAL AID, GRANTS, LOANS. 

WORK-STUDY ELIGIBILITY 
Director of Student Financial Aid 
927-5272 
1-800-633-2349 

GENERAL ACADEMIC AND 

FACULTY MATTERS 
Vice President and Dean of Faculty 
927-5261 

GIFTS, GRANTS & BEQUESTS 
Office of University Advancement 
927-5263 

GRADUATE STUDY 
Dean of Graduate Studies 
927-5377 

HOUSING 
Director of Housing 
927-5269 

MINORITY AFFAIRS 
Director of Minority Affairs 
927-5252 



PUBLIC RELATIONS 
Office of University Relations 
927-5263 

SECURITY 
Campus Police 
921-5555 

TEACHER CERTIFICATION 
Certification Officer 
927-5294 

TESTING 

Division of Student Affairs 
927-5269 

TRANSCRIPTS 
Office of the Registrar 
927-5275 

TUITION, PAYMENT OF BILLS, REFUNDS 
Vice President for Business & Finance 
927-5255 

WEEKEND AND OFF-CAMPUS 

PROGRAMS 
Director of Weekend and Off-Campus 

Programs 
961-3247 



Special Notice 

The statements set forth in this catalog are for 
information purposes only and should not be 
construed as the basis of a contract between a 
student and this institution. 

While the provisions of the catalog will generally 
be applied as stated. Armstrong Atlantic State 
University reserves the right to change any pro- 
vision listed in this catalog, including but not 
limited to academic requirements for gradua- 
tion, without actual notice to individual students. 
Every effort will be made to keep students ad- 
vised of any such changes. Information on 
changes will be available in the Offices of the 
Registrar, the Vice President of Student Affairs, 
and the academic deans. It is especially impor- 
tant that students note that it is their responsibility 
to keep themselves apprised of current gradua- 
tion requirements for their particular degree 
programs. 

Armstrong Atlantic State University is an affir- 
mative action/equal opportunity education 
institution and does not discriminate on the basis 
of sex. race. age. religion, disability, or national 
origin in employment, admissions, or activities. 




Armstrong Atlantic State University 

11935 Abercorn Street 
Savannah, Georgia 31419-1997 



A^SU